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Research Journal of Parasitology
  Year: 2011 | Volume: 6 | Issue: 1 | Page No.: 43-52
DOI: 10.3923/jp.2011.43.52
 
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Molecular Diagnosis of Naturally Infection with Eimeria nieschulzi in Laboratory Rats
Gautam Patra, M. Ayub Ali, Kh. Victoria Chanu, Jonathan Lalsiamthara, J.L. Kataria, Snigdha Hazarika, David Malsawmkima, R. Ravindran and L. Inaotombi Devi

Abstract:
An outbreak of coccidiosis in laboratory rats has been described in this study. Clinically, out of 50 rats, 30 were died after showing symptoms of anorexia, emaciation and diarrhea. Post mortem examination showed the large and small intestine distended with necrotic and sloughed off mucosal epithelial cells with intestinal content. The examination of the gut contents revealed numerous Eimeria oocysts. After sporulation, the oocysts were identified as those of Eimeria nieschulzi. The infection due to Eimeria nieschulzi is confirmed by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) after amplifying partial (~1.6 kb) nuclear 18S rDNA from DNA of E. nieschulzi. The histopathological examination showed severe damage of the lamina propria of the intestinal mucosa with numerous coccidian developmental stages in the epithelium of small intestine. Biochemical analysis of serum from infested rats presented a significant increase in serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST), glucose, total proteins, globulin and inorganic phosphorous while a decrease in alkaline phosphatase and blood urea nitrogen with insignificant changes in potassium, sodium, magnesium and chloride.
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How to cite this article:

Gautam Patra, M. Ayub Ali, Kh. Victoria Chanu, Jonathan Lalsiamthara, J.L. Kataria, Snigdha Hazarika, David Malsawmkima, R. Ravindran and L. Inaotombi Devi, 2011. Molecular Diagnosis of Naturally Infection with Eimeria nieschulzi in Laboratory Rats. Research Journal of Parasitology, 6: 43-52.

DOI: 10.3923/jp.2011.43.52

URL: https://scialert.net/abstract/?doi=jp.2011.43.52

COMMENTS
23 February, 2011
Dr. Michael Kurth:
I´ve some doubts that the identified species is Eimeria nieschulzi. We work for a long time with Eimeria nieschulzi and we never saw such necrotic tissue in the small intestine and never in the large intestine. Lesions caused by Eimeria nieschulzi are normally limited on the small intestine. Further, the shown oocyst in Figure 3 is (at least) not a (typical) Eimeria nieschulzi oocyst. The histological images have unfortunatly a too poor quality to see if the developmental stages are in the villi or in the crypts. With the used primer pair it is not possible to amplify the specific 18S rDNA of Eimeria nieschulzi. By the used primers you can amplify the 18S rDNA of every Eimeria species.The PCR reaction wasn´t a proof without sequencing.
 
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