Subscribe Now Subscribe Today
Research Article
 

Effects of Using Indian Mulberry Leaves as Feed Additives on Feed Digestion, Ruminal Fermentation and Milk Production in Dairy Cattle



Watchanapong Yupakarn, Virote Pattarajinda, Pornchai Lowilai and Srisomporn Priprem
 
Facebook Twitter Digg Reddit Linkedin StumbleUpon E-mail
ABSTRACT

The study considers the effects of the use of Indian mulberry leaves as feed additives on dairy cattle performances. Eight Holstein-Friesian crossbreeds with an average of 475.7 kg/BW were used. The experiment utilized 4 x 4 Replicated Latin Square Design (LSD) that consisted of 4 levels of Indian mulberry leaves additives: 0, 7.5, 10 and 12.5 g/kg DM in total mixed ration (TMR) diet based on rice straw was used as the main roughage source. The trial consisted of four periods of 21 days each. The results from this study showed that there was no effect on DMI. However, the digestibility of DM showed significant difference (p<0.05) with increasing levels of Indian mulberry leaves, except in the digestibility of CP, EE, NDF and ADF where there was no significant difference (p<0.05). There were no effects on ruminal pH, total VFA, acetate (C2), propionate (C3), butyrate (C4) and the C2/C3 ratio (p>0.05) (6.8, 100.8, 57.9, 29.1, 13.2 mol/L and 2.0, respectively). Milk production, milk composition, blood glucose and blood urea nitrogen did not show significant difference (p>0.05). However, Indian mulberry leaves at 10 g/kg DM could be used in dairy cattle feeding to improve the digestibility of feed DM and maintaining ruminal pH without affecting ruminal fermentation and milk production.

Services
Related Articles in ASCI
Similar Articles in this Journal
Search in Google Scholar
View Citation
Report Citation

 
  How to cite this article:

Watchanapong Yupakarn, Virote Pattarajinda, Pornchai Lowilai and Srisomporn Priprem, 2015. Effects of Using Indian Mulberry Leaves as Feed Additives on Feed Digestion, Ruminal Fermentation and Milk Production in Dairy Cattle. Pakistan Journal of Nutrition, 14: 620-624.

DOI: 10.3923/pjn.2015.620.624

URL: https://scialert.net/abstract/?doi=pjn.2015.620.624

REFERENCES
1:  Acamovic, T. and J.D. Brooker, 2005. Biochemistry of plant secondary metabolites and their effects in animals. Proc. Nutr. Soc., 64: 403-412.
CrossRef  |  Direct Link  |  

2:  AOAC., 1985. Official Methods of Analysis. 14th Edn., Association of Official Analytical Chemists, Arlington, VA.

3:  Bach, A., S. Calsamiglia and M.D. Stern, 2005. Nitrogen metabolism in the rumen. J. Dairy Sci., 88: E9-E21.
CrossRef  |  Direct Link  |  

4:  Beede, D.K. and R.J. Collier, 1986. Potential nutritional strategies for intensively managed cattle during thermal stress. J. Anim. Sci., 62: 543-554.
Direct Link  |  

5:  Busquet, M., S. Calsamiglia, A. Ferret, M.D. Carro and C. Kamel, 2005. Effect of garlic oil and four of its compounds on rumen microbial fermentation. J. Dairy Sci., 88: 4393-4404.
CrossRef  |  PubMed  |  Direct Link  |  

6:  Castillejos, L., S. Calsamiglia and A. Ferret, 2006. Effect of essential oil active compounds on rumen microbial fermentation and nutrient flow in in vitro systems. J. Dairy Sci., 89: 2649-2658.
CrossRef  |  Direct Link  |  

7:  Eastridge, M.L., 2006. Major advances in applied dairy cattle nutrition. J. Dairy Sci., 89: 1311-1323.
CrossRef  |  Direct Link  |  

8:  EFSA., 2008. Safety of leaves from Morinda citrifolia L. EFSA J., 769: 1-17.
Direct Link  |  

9:  France, J. and R.C. Siddons, 1993. Volatile Fatty Acid Production. In: Quantitative Aspects of Ruminant Digestion and Metabolism, Forbes, J.M. and J. France (Eds.). CAB International, Willingford, UK., pp: 107-122.

10:  Hemwimon, S., P. Pavasant and A. Shotipruk, 2007. Microwave-assisted extraction of antioxidative anthraquinones from roots of Morinda citrifolia. Sep. Purif. Technol., 54: 44-50.
CrossRef  |  Direct Link  |  

11:  Honey, J., B. Neha, B. Ranjan, S. Birendra and A. Thakur, 2012. Scientific basis of Noni plant (Morinda citrfolia). Asian J. Res. Pharmaceut. Sci., 2: 45-47.
Direct Link  |  

12:  Kohn, R.A., M.M. Dinneen and E. Russek-Cohen, 2005. Using blood urea nitrogen to predict nitrogen excretion and efficiency of nitrogen utilization in cattle, sheep, goats, horses, pigs and rats. J. Anim. Sci., 83: 879-889.
PubMed  |  Direct Link  |  

13:  Krause, K.M. and D.K. Combs, 2003. Effects of forage particle size, forage source and grain fermentability on performance and ruminal pH in midlactation cows. J. Dairy Sci., 86: 1382-1397.
CrossRef  |  Direct Link  |  

14:  Kung, Jr., L., K.A. Smith, A.M. Smagala, K.M. Endres, C.A. Bessett, N.K. Ranjit and J. Yaissle, 2003. Effects of 9,10 anthraquinone on ruminal fermentation, total-tract digestion and blood metabolite concentrations in sheep. J. Anim. Sci., 81: 323-328.
PubMed  |  Direct Link  |  

15:  Maynard, L.A. and J.K. Loosli, 1975. Animal Nutrition. 6th Edn., McGraw-Hill Co., New York, USA.

16:  McIntosh, F.M., P. Williams, R. Losa, R.J. Wallace, D.A. Beever and C.J. Newbold, 2003. Effects of essential oils on ruminal microorganisms and their protein metabolism. Applied Environ. Microbiol., 69: 5011-5014.
CrossRef  |  PubMed  |  Direct Link  |  

17:  Mudron, P., J. Rehage, H.P. Sallmann, M. Holtershinken and H. Scholz, 2005. Stress response in dairy cows related to blood glucose. Acta Veterinaria Brno, 74: 37-42.
Direct Link  |  

18:  Pattarajinda, V. and M. Duangjindam, 2006. Dairy feed and least cost feed formulation program. Department of Animal Science, Faculty of Agriculture, KhonKaen Universitry, KhonKaen.

19:  Samuel, M., S. Sagathevan, J. Thomas and G. Mathen, 1997. An HPLC method for estimation of volatile fatty acids in ruminal fluid. Indian J. Anim. Sci., 67: 805-807.
Direct Link  |  

20:  SAS, 1996. User's Guide: Statistics, Version 6. 12th Edn., SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC.

21:  Sutton, J.D., M.S. Dhanoa, S.V. Morant, J. France, D.J. Napper and E. Schuller, 2003. Rates of production of acetate, propionate and butyrate in the rumen of lactating dairy cows given normal and low-roughage diets. J. Dairy Sci., 86: 3620-3633.
CrossRef  |  Direct Link  |  

22:  Takashima, J., Y. Ikeda, K. Komiyama, M. Hayashi, A. Kishida and A. Ohsaki, 2007. New constituents from the leaves of Morinda citrifolia. Chem. Pharmaceut. Bull., 55: 343-345.
CrossRef  |  PubMed  |  Direct Link  |  

23:  Van Soest, P.J., 1994. Nutritional Ecology of the Ruminant. 2nd Edn., Cornell University Press, London, UK., Pages: 476.

24:  Van Soest, P.J., J.B. Robertson and B.A. Lewis, 1991. Methods for dietary fiber, neutral detergent fiber and nonstarch polysaccharides in relation to animal nutrition. J. Dairy Sci., 74: 3583-3597.
CrossRef  |  PubMed  |  Direct Link  |  

25:  Wang, M.Y., B.J. West, C.J. Jensen, D. Nowicki, C. Su, A.K. Palu and G. Anderson, 2002. Morinda citrifolia (Noni): A literature review and recent advances in noni research. Acta Pharmacol. Sin., 12: 1127-1141.
PubMed  |  Direct Link  |  

26:  Yulistiani, D., Z.A. Jelan, J.B. Liang, H. Yaakub and N. Abdullah, 2015. Effects of supplementation of mulberry (Morus alba) foliage and urea-rice bran as fermentable energy and protein sources in sheep fed urea-treated rice straw based diet. Asian-Aust. J. Anim. Sci., 28: 494-501.
CrossRef  |  Direct Link  |  

27:  Yupakarn, W. and V. Pattarajinda, 2012. The studies of using dry herbs and extract oil to improve in vitro dairy cattle feed digestibility. Khon Kaen Agric. J., 40: 137-140.

©  2020 Science Alert. All Rights Reserved