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International Journal of Poultry Science
  Year: 2018 | Volume: 17 | Issue: 5 | Page No.: 221-228
DOI: 10.3923/ijps.2018.221.228
 
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Mao Pomace on Carcass and Meat Quality of Broiler

Kanda Lokaewmanee and Panward Promdee

Abstract:
Objective: This study was conducted to determine the effect of mao pomace on the carcass and meat quality of broiler chickens. Methodology: The sample was divided into 4 groups, with 4 replicates of 25 chicks each. The chicks were provided ad libitum access to a diet consisting of 0% mao pomace (CON), 0.5% mao pomace (MPJ1), 1.0% mao pomace (MPJ2) or 1.5% mao pomace (MPJ3). The crude protein and metabolizable energy concentrations of these diets were adjusted to 230 g kg–1 CP and 13.40 MJ kg–1 ME for the 7-21 days-old chicks and 200 g kg–1 CP and 13.40 MJ kg–1 ME for the 22-42 days-old chicks, respectively. At 42 days, 15 chicks from each group were slaughtered and carcasses and meat quality were tested. Results: Carcass quality was not different among the groups, except for thigh weight with bone and total visceral organ weight, both of which decreased in the MPJ2 and MPJ3 groups. The diet supplemented with mao pomace improved the redness (a*) of the skin and the redness (a*) and yellowness (b*) of the abdominal fat, whereas it reduced the lightness (L*) of the breast meat and the redness (a*) and yellowness (b*) of the breast fillets of male broiler chickens. The shear force of the breast muscle increased in MPJ1, MPJ2 and MPJ3 groups (p<0.05). Cooking loss and drip loss were the highest in the MPJ3 group (p<0.05). The sensory scores of raw and cooked breast meat were not affected (p>0.05) by mao pomace supplementation. In contrast, the tenderness and taste of cooked breast meat were affected, with the highest scores (p<0.05) recorded from the MPJ2 group. There were no significant differences (p>0.05) in the meat, skin color, odor and overall acceptance of raw chicken breast samples among the CON, MPJ1, MPJ2 and MPJ3 groups. The sensory scores of cooked chicken breast meat for juiciness, flavor, mao odor and overall acceptance were not affected (p>0.05) by mao pomace supplementation. However, tenderness and taste were affected, with the highest scores (p<0.05) seen in MPJ2. Conclusion: Dietary supplementation of MPJ enhanced meat quality.
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How to cite this article:

Kanda Lokaewmanee and Panward Promdee, 2018. Mao Pomace on Carcass and Meat Quality of Broiler. International Journal of Poultry Science, 17: 221-228.

DOI: 10.3923/ijps.2018.221.228

URL: https://scialert.net/abstract/?doi=ijps.2018.221.228

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