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Articles by Amit Kumar Verma
Total Records ( 6 ) for Amit Kumar Verma
  Subhash Malik , Amit Kumar Verma , Amit Kumar , M.K. Gupta and S.D. Sharma
  Diarrhea in farm animals, especially in neonatal calves is one of the most challenging clinical syndromes encountered by practicing large animal’s veterinary practitioners. The objectives to study the prevalence of diarrhea cases in cattle and buffalo calves during the period of study (April, 2008-March, 2009) from the cases brought to TVCC, DUVASU, Mathura and district veterinary hospitals of North West UP; to compare the incidence rate of calf diarrhea in cattle and buffalo calves. Out of total 930 cases of calves recorded (from seven different government veterinary hospitals located in north west UP viz., Saharanpur, Muzaffarnagar, Baghpat, Meerut, Gautam Budh Nagar, Ghaziabad and teaching veterinary clinical complex (TVCC), DUVASU, Mathura) during the period, 499 (53.66%) were of calf diarrhea. The incidence rate of calf diarrhea ranged between 48.68% (Meerut) to 57.68% (TVCC, DUVASU, Mathura). Out of these 930 sick cases, 572 (61.50%) were of buffalo calves, which differ significantly (p<0.05) in comparison to 358 (38.5%) cattle calves. The incidence rate of calf diarrhea in cattle calves (52.51%) was almost similar to the incidence rate in buffalo calves (54.37%). Statistically, there was no significant difference with regards to monthly distribution of diarrhea cases. However, there was significant difference in the incidence of calf diarrhea between winter and summer months. The maximum number of calf diarrhea cases were reported after the onset of rains and continued till the end of winter and autumn, which appears to be related to post calving season and climatic stress.
  Amit Kumar Verma , Kuldeep Dhama , Sandip Chakraborty , Amit Kumar , Ruchi Tiwari , Anu Rahal , Mahima and Shoor Vir Singh
  Since, last several years, efforts are going on to eradicate or eliminate a number of infectious diseases of animals, with mixed success. Basically for eradicating, eliminating or controlling any infectious disease isolation and quarantine of sick animals as well as animals suspected for disease; strengthening disease monitoring and surveillance, effective vaccines and vaccination strategies along with other control measures including of treatment are of utmost importance. Most importantly a significant knowledge is required for countering infectious diseases and assessing the criteria for selection of disease to be eradicated next. The role of environmental factors in the process of disease dynamics need to be understood which further plays a contributory role in the process of combating and elimination of diseases. Despite continuous efforts against animal diseases like Rinderpest, Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) and Foot-and-mouth disease, Rinderpest (cattle plague) is the only one that is successfully eradicated till date in India. However, control programmes on CBPP also brought a significant reduction in the incidence of the disease but eradication status is yet to be declared. While the other disease control programmes viz., Foot-and-Mouth Disease Control Programme (FMDCP), National Control Programme on Brucellosis (NCPB), National Control Programme of Peste des Petits Ruminants (NCPPPR) and Avian Influenza: Preparedness, Control and Containment could not achieve the desired success. Nowadays, with the achievement of the global eradication status on rinderpest there is again a renewed interest in disease eradication and control of infectious diseases of animals and alleviating their public health concerns. The focus is also being given in the 12th five year plan of the country on monitoring and control of certain animal diseases of economic importance. In view of above facts, this is right time to discuss the strategies for combating and eradicating important infectious diseases of animals with particular reference to India, achievements of global rinderpest eradication programme and reasons thereof and possibly apply lessons while planning for the future activities. This article describes various prevention and control strategies for controlling the infectious diseases of animals that have been or should be targeted for eradication or elimination, direct and indirect benefits from control programmes, issues and opportunities for the future.
  Mahima , Amit Kumar Verma , Amit Kumar , Vinod Kumar and Anu Rahal
  With the advancement of science, there is a rising interest in poultry biotechnology for changing the composition of egg by nutritional as well as genetic manipulations for the human well beings. These alterations are in change in cholesterol level, fatty acids and adding therapeutic pharmaceutical compounds etc. For acceptance of this designer egg we have to address some of the legal, ethical and social aspects along with its economic production.
  Mahima , Anu Rahal , Rajib Deb , Shyma K. Latheef , Hari Abdul Samad , Ruchi Tiwari , Amit Kumar Verma , Amit Kumar and K. Dhama
  Herbs/Botanical plants are considered as God’s gift to human beings in the form of natural medicines, like the one well known “Sanjeevani booti” described in Hindu Mythology. The traditional and ethno-veterinary practices have been in use for centuries, transferring the knowledge from generation to generation and they are accessible, easy to prepare and administer, with little or no cost at all. Even though the modern developments in therapeutic field brought about a rapid decline in traditional medicine, the plant-based remedies are still having a crucial role as potential source of therapeutic aids in health systems all over the world for both humans and animals. Among the 21,000 medicinal plants listed by the World Health Organization (WHO), 2500 species are native to India, which stands first in the production of medicinal herbs. This innumerable treasure of medicinal herbs brings India the distinction of ‘the botanical garden of the world’. Nowadays immune-based therapies are gaining more importance than monovalent approaches which are having limited benefits. Apart from the actions like treating diseases, control of ecto- and endo-parasites, fertility enhancement, bone setting and poor mothering management, an array of herbal medicines have been reported which are having immunomodulatory effects like modulation of cytokine secretion, histamine release, immunoglobulin secretion, class switching, cellular co-receptor expression, lymphocyte expression, phagocytosis and so on. The present article describes in brief few of these important ones viz., ashwagandha, amla, tulsi, arjuna, aloe vera, garlic, turmeric, ginger, shatavari, neem, guduchi, kiwifruit, tut, kamala, palashlata, kokilaksha etc. being used for human and animal health benefits.
  Amit Kumar , Amit Kumar Verma , Anu Rahal , Pramod Kumar Panwar and K. Dhama
  Adjuvants are used as a carrier of antigen in modern vaccine therapy. These are heterogeneous compounds which are administered with antigens to elicit better immune response against co-administered antigens by stimulating the immune responses. Ideally, an adjuvant should not be mutagenic, carcinogenic and teratogenic and it should not produce any autoimmune disease. However, many of the adjuvants used in vaccine preparation have one or another side effect. The present paper describes in brief the history, development and recent trends in the adjuvant of vaccine.
  Radhey Mohan NAIK , Abhishek SRIVASTAVA and Amit Kumar VERMA
  The kinetics of ruthenium(III)-catalyzed oxidation of TREN, i.e. tris(2-amino ethyl)amine(3-hydrochloride) by an outer sphere electron transfer oxidant, potassium hexacyanoferrate(III), was investigated spectrophotometrically in aqueous alkaline medium. The extent of the reaction was followed by registering a decrease in absorbance at 420 nm (lmax of Fe(CN)63-) due to its consumption as a function of [OH-], ionic strength, [Fe(CN)63-], [TREN], and temperature by varying only one variable at a time and keeping all other variables constant. The rate data indicate that the reaction exhibited first order dependence in [oxidant] and at a lower concentrations of reductant. The overall reaction follows second order kinetics at constant [OH-] and proceeds via an associative Sn2 reaction path. The reaction was found to be first order at lower alkali concentrations, tending towards zero at higher concentrations. The rate of reaction increased linearly with increased ionic strength of the medium. A most probable mechanistic scheme explaining all the observed results has been proposed. Activation parameters were computed using the Arrhenius and Eyring equations, which provided additional support to the proposed associative Sn2 pathway.
 
 
 
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