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Articles by L Lin
Total Records ( 4 ) for L Lin
  A. K Fortune Greeley , N. C Hardy , L Lin , J. Y Friedman , J. S Lawlor , L. H Muhlbaier , M. A Hall , K. A Schulman , J Sugarman and K. P. Weinfurt
 

Background— Although the informed consent process is supposed to help potential research participants make informed and voluntary decisions about participating in research, little is known about how participants react to language in the informed consent document and whether their reactions are related to their willingness to enroll in clinical trials. We examined the relationship between patients’ reactions to standard informed consent language and their willingness to participate in a hypothetical clinical trial.

Methods and Results— We simulated the consent process for a hypothetical cardiology clinical trial with 470 patients in an outpatient cardiovascular medicine clinic at a large academic medical center. We analyzed the spontaneous comments and questions that participants made during the interviews about each section of the informed consent document. Few participants made positive comments. Participants made the most negative comments about the sections on risks, study purpose or protocol, and payment for injury. Having a negative reaction to any section was associated with a lower likelihood of participating in the clinical trial. Using a multivariable model, we found that negative reactions in the patient rights, financial disclosure, and confidentiality sections predicted willingness to participate (P<0.001).

Conclusions— Recognizing elements of informed consent that elicit questions and concerns from potential research participants may help investigators design clinical research trials and model language in a way that reduces concerns or increases participant understanding, thereby enhancing informed consent for research.

  L Lin , P Jiang , S Shen , S Sato , B. L Davidson and Y. Xing
 

Transposable elements (TEs) are major sources of new exons in higher eukaryotes. Almost half of the human genome is derived from TEs, and many types of TEs have the potential to exonize. In this work, we conducted a large-scale analysis of human exons derived from mammalian-wide interspersed repeats (MIRs), a class of old TEs which was active prior to the radiation of placental mammals. Using exon array data of 328 MIR-derived exons and RT–PCR analysis of 39 exons in 10 tissues, we identified 15 constitutively spliced MIR exons, and 15 MIR exons with tissue-specific shift in splicing patterns. Analysis of RNAs from multiple species suggests that the splicing events of many strongly included MIR exons have been established before the divergence of primates and rodents, while a small percentage result from recent exonization during primate evolution. Interestingly, exon array data suggest substantially higher splicing activities of MIR exons when compared with exons derived from Alu elements, a class of primate-specific retrotransposons. This appears to be a universal difference between exons derived from young and old TEs, as it is also observed when comparing Alu exons to exons derived from LINE1 and LINE2, two other groups of old TEs. Together, this study significantly expands current knowledge about exonization of TEs. Our data imply that with sufficient evolutionary time, numerous new exons could evolve beyond the evolutionary intermediate state and contribute functional novelties to modern mammalian genomes.

  K. E Szulwach , X Li , R. D Smrt , Y Li , Y Luo , L Lin , N. J Santistevan , W Li , X Zhao and P. Jin
 

The microRNA miR-137 represses expression of Ezh2, a histone methyltransferase, which in turn alters the epigenetic architecture of chromatin that is important for regulation of miR-137 levels.

  M. E Bechler , A. M Doody , E Racoosin , L Lin , K. H Lee and W. J. Brown
 

The PAFAH 1b complex links phospholipid remodeling and membrane tubulation within the Golgi to dynein-dependent transport.

 
 
 
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