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Articles by J. A Spertus
Total Records ( 11 ) for J. A Spertus
  P. S Chan , G Nichol , H. M Krumholz , J. A Spertus , B. K Nallamothu and for the American Heart Association National Registry of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (NRCPR) Invest
 

Background  Delays to defibrillation are associated with worse survival after in-hospital cardiac arrest, but the degree to which hospitals vary in defibrillation response times and hospital predictors of delays remain unknown.

Methods  Using hierarchical models, we evaluated hospital variation in rates of delayed defibrillation (>2 minutes) and its impact on survival among 7479 adult inpatients with cardiac arrests at 200 hospitals within the National Registry of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.

Results  Adjusted rates of delayed defibrillation varied substantially among hospitals (range, 2.4%-50.9%), with hospital-level effects accounting for a significant amount of the total variation in defibrillation delays after adjusting for patient factors. We found a 46% greater odds of patients with identical covariates getting delayed defibrillation at one randomly selected hospital compared with another. Among traditional hospital factors evaluated, however, only bed volume (reference category: <200 beds; 200-499 beds: odds ratio [OR], 0.62 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 0.48-0.80]; ≥500 beds: OR, 0.74 [95% CI, 0.53-1.04]) and arrest location (reference category: intensive care unit; telemetry unit: OR, 1.92 [95% CI, 1.65-2.22]; nonmonitored unit: OR, 1.90 [95% CI, 1.61-2.24]) were associated with differences in rates of delayed defibrillation. Wide variation also existed in adjusted hospital rates of survival to discharge (range, 5.3%-49.6%), with higher survival among hospitals in the top-performing quartile for defibrillation time (compared with the bottom quartile: OR for top quartile, 1.41 [95% CI, 1.11-1.77]).

Conclusions  Rates of delayed defibrillation vary widely among hospitals but are largely unexplained by traditional hospital factors. Given its association with improved survival, future research is needed to better understand best practices in the delivery of defibrillation at top-performing hospitals.

  G. C Fonarow , T Gregory , M Driskill , M. D Stewart , C Beam , J Butler , A. K Jacobs , N. M Meltzer , E. D Peterson , L. H Schwamm , J. A Spertus , C. W Yancy , G. F Tomaselli and R. L. Sacco
 

Cardiovascular disease and stroke remain leading causes of mortality, disability, and rising healthcare expenditures in the United States. Although a number of organizations provide hospital accreditation, recognition, and certification programs, existing programs do not address cardiovascular disease and stroke care in a comprehensive way. Current evidence suggests mixed findings for correlation between accreditation, recognition, and certification programs and hospitals' actual quality of care and outcomes. This advisory discusses potential opportunities to develop and enhance hospital certification programs for cardiovascular disease and stroke. The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association is uniquely positioned as a patient-centered, respected, transparent healthcare organization to help drive improvements in care and outcomes for patients hospitalized with cardiovascular disease and stroke. As a part of its commitment to promoting high-quality, evidence-based care for cardiovascular and stroke patients, it is recommended that the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association explore hospital certification programs to develop truly meaningful programs to facilitate improvements in and recognition for cardiovascular disease and stroke quality of care and outcomes. Future strategies should standardize objective, unbiased assessments of hospital structural, process, and outcome performance while allowing flexibility as technology and methodology advances occur.

  A Cheema , A Khalid , A Wimmer , C Bartone , T Chow , J. A Spertus and P. S. Chan
  Background—

Fragmented QRS (fQRS) has been shown to predict cardiac events in select patient populations. Whether fQRS improves patient selection for primary prevention patients eligible for implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapy remains unknown.

Methods and Results—

In a prospective, multisite cohort of 842 patients with left ventricular dysfunction (ejection fraction ≤35%) representing both ischemic and nonischemic etiology, the presence of fQRS on ECG was assessed using standardized criteria. The association between fQRS and all-cause and arrhythmic mortality was evaluated overall and stratified by ICD status using multivariable Cox regression models, adjusted for demographic, clinical, and treatment variables. Fragmented QRS was present in 274 (32.5%) patients, and there were 191 (22.7%) deaths during a mean follow-up of 40±17 months. Rates of all-cause mortality did not differ between the fQRS+ (19.7%) and fQRS– (24.1%) groups; adjusted hazard ratio, 0.88; 95% confidence interval, 0.63–1.22; P=0.43. Additionally, rates of arrhythmic mortality were similar between the fQRS+ (9.9%) and fQRS– (12.7%) groups: adjusted hazard ratio, 0.77; 95% confidence interval, 0.49–1.31; P=0.38. Subgroup analyses found no association between fQRS and mortality when the cohort was further stratified by ICD status, etiology of left ventricular dysfunction, wide (≥120 ms) versus narrow (<120 ms) QRS duration, or fQRS myocardial territory.

Conclusions—

In this prospective, multisite cohort of primary prevention patients with left ventricular dysfunction, the presence of fQRS on ECG was not associated with a higher risk of either all-cause or arrhythmic mortality. These findings do not provide evidence that fQRS would be effective in risk stratifying primary prevention patients eligible for ICD therapy.

  S. K Mehta , A. D Frutkin , J. B Lindsey , J. A House , J. A Spertus , S. V Rao , F. S Ou , M. T Roe , E. D Peterson , S. P Marso and on Behalf of the National Cardiovascular Data Registry
 

Background— Bleeding in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is associated with increased morbidity, mortality, length of hospitalization, and cost. We identified baseline clinical characteristics associated with bleeding complications after PCI and developed a simplified, clinically useful algorithm to predict patient risk.

Methods and Results— Data were analyzed from 302 152 PCI procedures performed at 440 US centers participating in the National Cardiovascular Data Registry. As defined by the National Cardiovascular Data Registry, bleeding required transfusion, prolonged hospital stay, and/or a drop in hemoglobin >3.0 g/dL from any location, including percutaneous entry site, retroperitoneal, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and other/unknown location. Bleeding complications occurred in 2.4% of patients. From the best-fitting model consisting of 15 clinical elements associated with post-PCI bleeding in a random 80% training cohort, we developed a parsimonious risk algorithm. Predictors of bleeding included age, gender, previous heart failure, glomerular filtration rate, peripheral vascular disease, no previous PCI, New York Heart Association/Canadian Cardiovascular Society Functional Classification class IV heart failure, ST-elevation myocardial infarction, non–ST-elevation myocardial infarction, and cardiogenic shock. The parsimonious model was validated in the remaining 20% of the population (c-statistic, 0.72) and in clinically relevant subgroups of patients. This simplified model was used to derive a clinical risk algorithm, with larger numbers corresponding with greater risk. In 3 categories, bleeding rates were greater in patients with higher estimates (≤7, 0.7%; 8 to 17, 1.8%; ≥18, 5.1%).

Conclusions— This report identifies baseline clinical factors associated with bleeding and proposes a clinically useful algorithm to estimate bleeding risk. This model is potentially actionable in altering therapeutic decision making and improving outcomes in patients undergoing PCI.

  K. G Smolderen , J. A Spertus , K. J Reid , D. M Buchanan , H. M Krumholz , J Denollet , V Vaccarino and P. S. Chan
 

Background— Among patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), depression is both common and underrecognized. The association of different manifestations of depression, somatic and cognitive, with depression recognition and long-term prognosis is poorly understood.

Methods and Results— Depression was confirmed in 481 AMI patients enrolled from 21 sites during their index hospitalization with a Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) score ≥10. Within the PHQ-9, separate somatic and cognitive symptom scores were derived, and the independent association between these domains and the clinical recognition of depression, as documented in the medical records, was evaluated. In a separate multisite AMI registry of 2347 patients, the association between somatic and cognitive depressive symptoms and 4-year all-cause mortality and 1-year all-cause rehospitalization was evaluated. Depression was clinically recognized in 29% (n=140) of patients. Cognitive depressive symptoms (relative risk per SD increase, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.26; P=0.01) were independently associated with depression recognition, whereas the association for somatic symptoms and recognition (relative risk, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.87 to 1.26; P=0.66) was not significant. However, unadjusted Cox regression analyses found that only somatic depressive symptoms were associated with 4-year mortality (hazard ratio [HR] per SD increase, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.08 to 1.39) or 1-year rehospitalization (HR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.11 to 1.33), whereas cognitive manifestations were not (HR for mortality, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.89 to 1.14; HR for rehospitalization, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.93 to 1.11). After multivariable adjustment, the association between somatic symptoms and rehospitalization persisted (HR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.27; P=0.01) but was attenuated for mortality (HR, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.94 to 1.21; P=0.30).

Conclusions— Depression after AMI was recognized in fewer than 1 in 3 patients. Although cognitive symptoms were associated with recognition of depression, somatic symptoms were associated with long-term outcomes. Comprehensive screening and treatment of both somatic and cognitive symptoms may be necessary to optimize depression recognition and treatment in AMI patients.

  E. D Peterson , J. A Spertus , D. J Cohen , M. A Hlatky , A. S Go , B. G Vickrey , J. L Saver and P. C. Hinton
 

Background— The field of outcomes research seeks to define optimal treatment in practice and to promote the rapid full adoption of efficacious therapies into routine clinical care. The American Heart Association (AHA) formed the AHA Pharmaceutical Roundtable (PRT) Outcomes Research Centers Network to accelerate attainment of these goals. Participating centers were intended to carry out state-of-the-art outcomes research in cardiovascular disease and stroke, to train the next generation of investigators, and to support the formation of a collaborative research network.

Program— After a competitive application process, 4 AHA PRT Outcomes Research Centers were selected: Duke Clinical Research Institute; Saint Luke’s Mid America Heart Institute; Stanford University–Kaiser Permanente of Northern California; and University of California, Los Angeles. Each center proposed between 1 and 3 projects organized around a single theme in cardiovascular disease or stroke. Additionally, each center will select and train up to 6 postdoctoral fellows over the next 4 years, and will participate in cross-collaborative activities among the centers.

Conclusions— The AHA PRT Outcomes Research Centers Network is designed to further strengthen the field of cardiovascular disease and stroke outcomes research by fostering innovative research, supporting high quality training, and encouraging center-to-center collaborations.

  E. C Leifheit Limson , K. J Reid , S. V Kasl , H Lin , P. G Jones , D. M Buchanan , S Parashar , P. N Peterson , J. A Spertus and J. H. Lichtman
 

Background— Prior studies have associated low social support (SS) with increased rehospitalization and mortality after acute myocardial infarction. However, relatively little is known about whether similar patterns exist for other outcomes, such as health status and depressive symptoms, and whether these patterns vary by sex.

Methods and Results— Using data from 2411 English- or Spanish-speaking patients with acute myocardial infarction enrolled in a 19-center prospective study, we examined the association of SS (low, moderate, high) with health status (angina, disease-specific quality of life, general physical and mental functioning) and depressive symptoms over the first year of recovery. Overall and sex-stratified associations were evaluated using mixed-effects Poisson and linear regression, adjusting for site, baseline health status, baseline depressive symptoms, and demographic and clinical factors. Patients with the lowest SS (relative to those with the highest) had increased risk of angina (relative risk, 1.27; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10, 1.48); lower disease-specific quality of life (mean difference [β]=–3.33; 95% CI, –5.25, –1.41), lower mental functioning (β=–1.72; 95% CI, –2.65, –0.79), and more depressive symptoms (β=0.94; 95% CI, 0.51, 1.38). A nonsignificant trend toward lower physical functioning (β=–0.87; 95% CI, –1.95, 0.20) was observed. In sex-stratified analyses, the relationship between SS and outcomes was stronger for women than for men, with a significant SS-by-sex interaction for disease-specific quality of life, physical functioning, and depressive symptoms (all P<0.02).

Conclusions— Lower SS is associated with worse health status and more depressive symptoms over the first year of acute myocardial infarction recovery, particularly for women.

  A. C Salisbury , K. P Alexander , K. J Reid , F. A Masoudi , S. S Rathore , T. Y Wang , R. G Bach , S. P Marso , J. A Spertus and M. Kosiborod
  Background—

Anemia is common among patients hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction and is associated with poor outcomes. Less is known about the incidence, correlates, and prognostic implications of acute, hospital-acquired anemia (HAA).

Methods and Results—

We identified 2909 patients with acute myocardial infarction who had normal hemoglobin (Hgb) on admission in the multicenter TRIUMPH registry and defined HAA by criteria proposed by Beutler and Waalen. We used hierarchical Poisson regression to identify independent correlates of HAA and multivariable proportional hazards regression to identify the association of HAA with mortality and health status. At discharge, 1321 (45.4%) patients had HAA, of whom 348 (26.3%) developed moderate-severe HAA (Hgb <11 g/dL). The incidence of HAA varied significantly across hospitals (range, 33% to 69%; median rate ratio for HAA, 1.13; 95% confidence interval, 1.07 to 1.23, adjusting for patient characteristics). Although documented bleeding was more frequent with more severe HAA, fewer than half of the patients with moderate-severe HAA had any documented bleeding. Independent correlates of HAA included age, female sex, white race, chronic kidney disease, ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, acute renal failure, use of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors, in-hospital complications (cardiogenic shock, bleeding and bleeding severity), and length of stay. After adjustment for GRACE score and bleeding, patients with moderate-severe HAA had higher mortality rates (hazard ratio, 1.82; 95% confidence interval, 1.11 to 2.98 versus no HAA) and poorer health status at 1 year.

Conclusions—

HAA develops in nearly half of acute myocardial infarction hospitalizations among patients treated medically or with percutaneous coronary intervention, commonly in the absence of documented bleeding, and is associated with worse mortality and health status. Better understanding of how HAA can be prevented and whether its prevention can improve patient outcomes is needed.

  B. R Chaitman , P. M Hartigan , D. C Booth , K. K Teo , G. B. J Mancini , W. J Kostuk , J. A Spertus , D. J Maron , M Dada , R. A O'Rourke , W. S Weintraub , D. S Berman , L. J Shaw and W. E Boden
  Background—

The Clinical Outcomes Utilizing Revascularization and Aggressive Drug Evaluation (COURAGE) trial enrolled patients from 3 distinct healthcare systems (HCSs) in North America. The primary aim of this study was to determine whether there is a treatment difference in cardiovascular outcomes by HCS.

Methods and Results—

The study population included 968 patients from the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), 386 from the US non-VA, and 931 from Canada with different comorbidities and prognoses. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality or nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI) during the median 4.6-year follow-up. Baseline demographics were similar between percutaneous coronary intervention and optimal medical therapy treatment groups within each HCS. After follow-up, the primary end point of total mortality and nonfatal MI was not statistically significant between percutaneous coronary intervention and optimal medical therapy, regardless of HCS: VA, 22.3% versus 21.9% (hazard ratio, 1.05; 95% CI, 0.80–1.38; P=0.95); US non-VA, 15.8% versus 21.8% (hazard ratio, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.43–1.12; P=0.24); Canadian HCS, 17.3% versus 13.5% (hazard ratio, 1.30; 95% CI, 0.93–1.83; P=0.17). The interaction between HCSs and treatment was not statistically significant. Long-term mortality was significantly higher in the VA system as a result of significantly greater comorbidity and worse left ventricular function.

Conclusions—

In the COURAGE trial, addition of percutaneous coronary intervention to optimal medical therapy did not improve 5-year survival or reduce MI or other major adverse cardiovascular events regardless of whether patients were Canadian or American or US veterans or nonveterans. Outcome differences were largely explained by differences in baseline characteristics known to affect long-term prognosis.

Clinical Trial Registration—

URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00007657.

  J. H Lichtman , N. P Lorenze , G D'Onofrio , J. A Spertus , S. T Lindau , T. M Morgan , J Herrin , H Bueno , J. A Mattera , P. M Ridker and H. M. Krumholz
  Background—

Among individuals with ischemic heart disease, young women with an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) represent an extreme phenotype associated with an excess mortality risk. Although women younger than 55 years of age account for less than 5% of hospitalized AMI events, almost 16 000 deaths are reported annually in this group, making heart disease a leading killer of young women. Despite a higher risk of mortality compared with similarly aged men, young women have been the subject of few studies.

Methods and Results—

Variation in Recovery: Role of Gender on Outcomes of Young AMI Patients (VIRGO) is a large, observational study of the presentation, treatment, and outcomes of young women and men with AMI. VIRGO will enroll 2000 women, 18 to 55 years of age, with AMI and a comparison cohort of 1000 men with AMI from more than 100 participating hospitals. The aims of the study are to determine sex differences in the distribution and prognostic importance of biological, demographic, clinical, and psychosocial risk factors; to determine whether there are sex differences in the quality of care received by young AMI patients; and to determine how these factors contribute to sex differences in outcomes (including mortality, hospitalization, and health status). Blood serum and DNA for consenting participants will be stored for future studies.

Conclusions—

VIRGO will seek to identify novel and prognostic factors that contribute to outcomes in this young AMI population. Results from the study will be used to develop clinically useful risk-stratification models for young AMI patients, explain sex differences in outcomes, and identify targets for intervention.

  J. S Ross , J Chen , Z Lin , H Bueno , J. P Curtis , P. S Keenan , S. L. T Normand , G Schreiner , J. A Spertus , M. T Vidan , Y Wang and H. M. Krumholz
 

Background— In July 2009, Medicare began publicly reporting hospitals’ risk-standardized 30-day all-cause readmission rates (RSRRs) among fee-for-service beneficiaries discharged after hospitalization for heart failure from all the US acute care nonfederal hospitals. No recent national trends in RSRRs have been reported, and it is not known whether hospital-specific performance is improving or variation in performance is decreasing.

Methods and Results— We used 2004–2006 Medicare administrative data to identify all fee-for-service beneficiaries admitted to a US acute care hospital for heart failure and discharged alive. We estimated mean annual RSRRs, a National Quality Forum-endorsed metric for quality, using 2-level hierarchical models that accounted for age, sex, and multiple comorbidities; variation in quality was estimated by the SD of the RSRRs. There were 570 996 distinct hospitalizations for heart failure in which the patient was discharged alive in 4728 hospitals in 2004, 544 550 in 4694 hospitals in 2005, and 501 234 in 4674 hospitals in 2006. Unadjusted 30-day all-cause readmission rates were virtually identical over this period: 23.0% in 2004, 23.3% in 2005, and 22.9% in 2006. The mean and SD of RSRRs were also similar: mean (SD) of 23.7% (1.3) in 2004, 23.9% (1.4) in 2005, and 23.8% (1.4) in 2006, suggesting similar hospital variation throughout the study period.

Conclusions— National mean and RSRR distributions among Medicare beneficiaries discharged after hospitalization for heart failure have not changed in recent years, indicating that there was neither improvement in hospital readmission rates nor in hospital variations in rates over this time period.

 
 
 
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