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Articles by Eric Siemers
Total Records ( 7 ) for Eric Siemers
  John Q. Trojanowski , Hugo Vandeerstichele , Magdalena Korecka , Christopher M. Clark , Paul S. Aisen , Ronald C. Petersen , Kaj Blennow , Holly Soares , Adam Simon , Piotr Lewczuk , Robert Dean , Eric Siemers , William Z. Potter , Michael W. Weiner , Clifford R. Jack Jr. , William Jagust , Arthur W. Toga , Virginia M.-Y. Lee and Leslie M. Shaw
  Here, we review progress by the Penn Biomarker Core in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) toward developing a pathological cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma biomarker signature for mild Alzheimer's disease (AD) as well as a biomarker profile that predicts conversion of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and/or normal control subjects to AD. The Penn Biomarker Core also collaborated with other ADNI Cores to integrate data across ADNI to temporally order changes in clinical measures, imaging data, and chemical biomarkers that serve as mileposts and predictors of the conversion of normal control to MCI as well as MCI to AD, and the progression of AD. Initial CSF studies by the ADNI Biomarker Core revealed a pathological CSF biomarker signature of AD defined by the combination of Aβ1-42 and total tau (T-tau) that effectively delineates mild AD in the large multisite prospective clinical investigation conducted in ADNI. This signature appears to predict conversion from MCI to AD. Data fusion efforts across ADNI Cores generated a model for the temporal ordering of AD biomarkers which suggests that Aβ amyloid biomarkers become abnormal first, followed by changes in neurodegenerative biomarkers (CSF tau, F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance imaging) with the onset of clinical symptoms. The timing of these changes varies in individual patients due to genetic and environmental factors that increase or decrease an individual's resilience in response to progressive accumulations of AD pathologies. Further studies in ADNI will refine this model and render the biomarkers studied in ADNI more applicable to routine diagnosis and to clinical trials of disease modifying therapies.
  Michael W. Weiner , Paul S. Aisen , Clifford R. Jack Jr. , William J. Jagust , John Q. Trojanowski , Leslie Shaw , Andrew J. Saykin , John C. Morris , Nigel Cairns , Laurel A. Beckett , Arthur Toga , Robert Green , Sarah Walter , Holly Soares , Peter Snyder , Eric Siemers , William Potter , Patricia E. Cole and Mark Schmidt
  The Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) beginning in October 2004, is a 6-year research project that studies changes of cognition, function, brain structure and function, and biomarkers in elderly controls, subjects with mild cognitive impairment, and subjects with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). A major goal is to determine and validate MRI, PET images, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)/blood biomarkers as predictors and outcomes for use in clinical trials of AD treatments. Structural MRI, FDG PET, C-11 Pittsburgh compound B (PIB) PET, CSF measurements of amyloid β (Aβ) and species of tau, with clinical/cognitive measurements were performed on elderly controls, subjects with mild cognitive impairment, and subjects with AD. Structural MRI shows high rates of brain atrophy, and has high statistical power for determining treatment effects. FDG PET, C-11 Pittsburgh compound B PET, and CSF measurements of Aβ and tau were significant predictors of cognitive decline and brain atrophy. All data are available at UCLA/LONI/ADNI, without embargo. ADNI-like projects started in Australia, Europe, Japan, and Korea. ADNI provides significant new information concerning the progression of AD.
  Mark E. Schmidt , Eric Siemers , Peter J. Snyder , William Z. Potter , Patricia Cole and Holly Soares
  The Industry Scientific Advisory Board (ISAB) consists of representatives from the private companies and nonprofit foundations participating as sponsors of Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). Currently 21 companies are represented including pharmaceutical, imaging, and biotech concerns, and two foundations including the Alzheimer’s Association. ISAB members meet regularly by teleconference or face-to-face at ADNI meetings and participate in the ADNI Core groups, all administered and organized by the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health. ISAB ‘deliverables’ include dissemination of information to sponsors, assisting in scientific review of protocols and results, initiation and consideration of “add-on” studies and analyses, and generation of consensus positions on industry priorities and concerns. Although positioned as an advisory body, ISAB also actively contributes to the ADNI mission of identifying biomarkers of disease progression.
  Zaven S. Khachaturian , Deborah Barnes , Richard Einstein , Sterling Johnson , Virginia Lee , Allen Roses , Mark A. Sager , William R. Shankle , Peter J. Snyder , Ronald C. Petersen , Gerard Schellenberg , John Trojanowski , Paul Aisen , Marilyn S. Albert , John C.S. Breitner , Neil Buckholtz , Maria Carrillo , Steven Ferris , Barry D. Greenberg , Michael Grundman , Ara S. Khachaturian , Lewis H. Kuller , Oscar L. Lopez , Paul Maruff , Richard C. Mohs , Marcelle Morrison- Bogorad , Creighton Phelps , Eric Reiman , Marwan Sabbagh , Mary Sano , Lon S. Schneider , Eric Siemers , Pierre Tariot , Jacques Touchon , Bruno Vellas and Lisa J. Bain
  Among the major impediments to the design of clinical trials for the prevention of Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most critical is the lack of validated biomarkers, assessment tools, and algorithms that would facilitate identification of asymptomatic individuals with elevated risk who might be recruited as study volunteers. Thus, the Leon Thal Symposium 2009 (LTS'09), on October 27–28, 2009 in Las Vegas, Nevada, was convened to explore strategies to surmount the barriers in designing a multisite, comparative study to evaluate and validate various approaches for detecting and selecting asymptomatic people at risk for cognitive disorders/dementia. The deliberations of LTS'09 included presentations and reviews of different approaches (algorithms, biomarkers, or measures) for identifying asymptomatic individuals at elevated risk for AD who would be candidates for longitudinal or prevention studies. The key nested recommendations of LTS'09 included: (1) establishment of a National Database for Longitudinal Studies as a shared research core resource; (2) launch of a large collaborative study that will compare multiple screening approaches and biomarkers to determine the best method for identifying asymptomatic people at risk for AD; (3) initiation of a Global Database that extends the concept of the National Database for Longitudinal Studies for longitudinal studies beyond the United States; and (4) development of an educational campaign that will address public misconceptions about AD and promote healthy brain aging.
  Rachelle S. Doody , Patricia E. Cole , David S. Miller , Eric Siemers , Ronald Black , Howard Feldman , Rachel Schindler , Stephen Graham , Theresa Heath , Ara S. Khachaturian , Rebecca Evans and Maria C. Carrillo
  The number of clinical trials for Alzheimer‘s disease conducted outside the United States in a broad array of countries is increasing. As the number of compounds ready for clinical testing increases, and as trials become longer and more complex, this trend is expected to grow. The cultural and ethical context of global clinical trials, potential benefits for those involved, and practical approaches to obstacles generated by these global trials were discussed at a meeting of the Alzheimer‘s Association Research Roundtable. Regulatory issues, including regional differences in study registration procedures, rules for collecting and reporting serious adverse events, requirements for national identity of study populations, and regulatory audits were also discussed by individuals who are knowledgeable about global clinical trials for Alzheimer‘s disease.
  Reisa A. Sperling , Paul S. Aisen , Laurel A. Beckett , Laurel A. Beckett , Suzanne Craft , Anne M. Fagan , Takeshi Iwatsubo , Clifford R. Jack , Jeffrey Kaye , Thomas J. Montine , Denise C. Park , Eric M. Reiman , Christopher C. Rowe , Eric Siemers , Yaakov Stern , Yaakov Stern , Maria C. Carrillo , Bill Thies , Marcelle Morrison- Bogorad , Molly V. Wagster and Creighton H. Phelps
  The National Institute on Aging and the Alzheimer‘s Association charged a workgroup with the task of developing criteria for the symptomatic predementia phase of Alzheimer‘s disease (AD), referred to in this article as mild cognitive impairment due to AD. The workgroup developed the following two sets of criteria: (1) core clinical criteria that could be used by healthcare providers without access to advanced imaging techniques or cerebrospinal fluid analysis, and (2) research criteria that could be used in clinical research settings, including clinical trials. The second set of criteria incorporate the use of biomarkers based on imaging and cerebrospinal fluid measures. The final set of criteria for mild cognitive impairment due to AD has four levels of certainty, depending on the presence and nature of the biomarker findings. Considerable work is needed to validate the criteria that use biomarkers and to standardize biomarker analysis for use in community settings.
  Christopher Carlson , Wahiba Estergard , Joonmi Oh , Joyce Suhy , Clifford R. Jack , Eric Siemers and Jerome Barakos
  Background Cerebral vasogenic edema (VE) has been reported to occur during antiamyloid immunotherapy. VE may be associated with central nervous system pathology with blood–brain barrier disruptions; however, less is known about the prevalence of naturally occurring VE in patients with Alzheimer‘s disease (AD). Methods Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery imaging sequences were obtained from four ongoing multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trials in patients with mild-to-moderate AD. The first set of baseline scans was from patients in volumetric magnetic resonance imaging addenda in the Interrupting Alzheimer's Dementia by EvaluatiNg Treatment of Amyloid PaThologY (IDENTITY) studies examining semagacestat, a γ-secretase inhibitor (cohort 1, n = 621). The second set of baseline scans was from the EXPanding alzhEimer's Disease InvestigaTIONs (EXPEDITION) studies examining solanezumab, an anti-Aβ monoclonal antibody (cohort 2, n = 2141). Readers were blinded to patient-identifying information and future treatment. A third set of baseline scans was from the first 700 patients who underwent protocol-specified magnetic resonance imaging before randomization in the EXPEDITION studies (cohort 3). The analysis used three neuroradiologists: two performed independent primary interpretations and the third was the adjudicator. Readers were blinded to patient information, treatment, protocol, and time point. Results Four cases of asymptomatic VE were detected at baseline/screening. Two VE cases were due to underlying extra-axial mass lesions. The third VE case was associated with numerous microhemorrhages in keeping with cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation or Aβ-related angiitis. The final VE case demonstrated localized sulcal fluid-attenuated inversion recovery imaging hyperintensity. No VE was detected in cohort 3 by readers blinded to patient baseline status. Conclusions VE seems to be rare at baseline in patients with AD in clinical trials, 2 of 2762 associated with AD. Additional cohorts should be evaluated to support these findings.
 
 
 
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