Subscribe Now Subscribe Today
Research Article
 

Growth Rate, Carcass Weight and Percentage Weight of Carcass Parts of Laying Type Cockerels, Kampong Chicken and Arabic Chicken in Different Ages



M.H. Tamzil, M. Ichsan, N.S. Jaya and M. Taqiuddin
 
Facebook Twitter Digg Reddit Linkedin StumbleUpon E-mail
ABSTRACT

This study was designed to determine the effect of age of laying-type cockerels, kampong chicken and arabic chicken on growth performance, carcass weight and the percentage weight of carcass parts. The experiment was designed in a Complete Randomized Design with 3 x 7 factorial arrangements. The first factor was types or lines of chicken consisted of 3 levels i.e., laying-type cockerels, kampong chicken and arabic chicken. The second factor was age of slaughtering consisted of 7 levels i.e., at the ages of 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 weeks. The study used 63 day old chick (DOC) laying-type cockerels, 63 unsexed DOC kampong chickens and 63 unsexed DOC arabic chickens. Each line of chicken was divided into 9 groups consisted of 7 chicks. Every group was kept in a one meter cubic cage. Every weekend, feed intake and body weight were measured. At the end of the fourth week, from each group, one chicken was randomly selected for measurement of live weight, carcass weight and the percentage weight of carcass part. The results of the study found that laying-type cockerel, kampong chicken and arabic chicken had the same feed intake and feed efficiency, but had different body weight gains, carcass weights and the percentage weight of carcass parts (drumstick, thighs, wings, breast and back). The increase of age affected feed intake, body weight gain, feed efficiency, carcass and the percentage weight of carcass part. There was an interaction between the line of chicken and age on body weight gain, but there was no interaction on feed intake, feed efficiency, carcass weight and the percentage weight of carcass part (drumstick, thighs, wings, breast and back).

Services
Related Articles in ASCI
Similar Articles in this Journal
Search in Google Scholar
View Citation
Report Citation

 
  How to cite this article:

M.H. Tamzil, M. Ichsan, N.S. Jaya and M. Taqiuddin, 2015. Growth Rate, Carcass Weight and Percentage Weight of Carcass Parts of Laying Type Cockerels, Kampong Chicken and Arabic Chicken in Different Ages. Pakistan Journal of Nutrition, 14: 377-382.

DOI: 10.3923/pjn.2015.377.382

URL: https://scialert.net/abstract/?doi=pjn.2015.377.382

REFERENCES
1:  Bochno, R., W. Brzozowski and D. Murawska, 2003. Age-related changes in the distribution of meat, fat with skin and bones in broiler chicken carcasses. Polish J. Nat. Sci., 14: 335-345.
Direct Link  |  

2:  Bochno, R., W. Brzozowski and D. Murawska, 2005. Age-related changes in the distribution of lean, fat with skin and bones in duck carcases. Br. Poult. Sci., 46: 199-203.
CrossRef  |  PubMed  |  Direct Link  |  

3:  Brody, S., 1945. Bioenergetics and Growth. Reinhold Publishing Co., UK., Pages: 1023.

4:  Creswell, D.J. and B. Gunawan, 1982. Indigenous chicken in Indonesia: Production characteristics in animproved environment. Report No. 2, Research Institute for Animal Production, Bogor, Indonesi, pp: 1-12.

5:  Daikwo, I.S., A.A. Okpe and J.O. Ocheja, 2011. Phenotypic characterization of local chickens in Dekina. Int. J. Poult. Sci., 10: 444-447.
CrossRef  |  Direct Link  |  

6:  Damme, K. and M. Ristic, 2003. Fattening performance, meat yield and economic aspects of meat and layer type hybrids. World's Poult. Sci. J., 59: 50-53.
Direct Link  |  

7:  De Almeida, A.M. and U. Zuber, 2010. The effect of the Naked Neck genotype (Nana), feeding and outdoor rearing on growth and carcass characteristics of free range broilers in a hot climate. Trop. Anim. Health Prod., 42: 99-107.
CrossRef  |  Direct Link  |  

8:  De Marchi, M., M. Cassandro, E. Lunardi, G. Baldan and P.B. Siegel, 2005. Carcass characteristics and qualitative meat traits of the padovana breed of chicken. Int. J. Poult. Sci., 4: 233-238.
CrossRef  |  Direct Link  |  

9:  Gerken, M., D. Jaenecke, M. Kreuzer and D. Martin, 2003. Growth, behaviour and carcass characteristics of egg-type cockerels compared to male broilers. World's Poult. Sci. J., 59: 46-49.

10:  Hafez, E.S.E., 1955. Differential growth of organs and edible meat in the domestic fowl. Poult. Sci., 34: 745-753.
CrossRef  |  Direct Link  |  

11:  Iqbal, S., Z.A. Pampori and D. Hasin, 2009. Carcass and egg characteristics of indigenous chicken of Kashmir (Kashmir Favorella). Indian J. Anim. Res., 43: 194-196.

12:  Isoberam, C.E. and B.M. Itori, 2012. Genetic and sex differences in carcass traits of Nigerian indigenous chickens. J. Anim. Sci. Adv., 2: 637-648.
Direct Link  |  

13:  Iskandar, S., H. Resnawati and T. Pasaribu, 2000. Growth and carcass responses of three lines of local chickens and its crossing to detary lysine and methionine. Proceedings of the 3rd International Seminar on Tropical Animal Production and Total Menegement of Local Resources, (ISTAPTMLR'00), Gadjah Mada University -.

14:  Khalid, A.M., I.A. Yousif, M.I. Omer and K.M. Elamin, 2012. Genetic Variability of Body Composition Traits in Sudanese Native large Beladi Chicken. Agric. Biol. J. North Am., 3: 69-76.
CrossRef  |  Direct Link  |  

15:  Murawska, D., R. Bochno, D. Michalik and M. Janiszewska, 2005. Age-related changes in the carcass tissue composition and distribution of meat and fat with skin in carcasses of laying-type cockerels. Arch. Geflugelk, 69: 135-139.
Direct Link  |  

16:  Nishida, T., K. Nozawa, K. Kondo, S.S. Mansjur and H. dan Martojo, 1980. Morphological and genticalstudies on the Indonesian native fowl. The Original and Phylogeny of Indonesian Native Livestock Investigation on the Catle, Fowl and their Wild Form, pp: 47-70.

17:  Pomeroy, R.W., 1955. Live-Weight Growth. In: Progress in the Physiology of Farm Animal, Hammond, J. (Ed.). Butterworths Scientific Publications, London, UK., pp: 395-429.

18:  Roan, S.W. and C.L. Hu, 1997. Growth performance and carcass characteristics of Taiwan simulated native chickens. J. Chin. Soc. Anim. Sci., 26: 163-176.

19:  Safalaoh, A.C.L., 1998. Resfonse of the Malawi local chicken to commercial feed up to eight weeks of age. Bull. Anim. Health Prod., 46: 245-249.

20:  SAS., 2004. SAS/STAT User's Guide: Version 9.1. Statistical Analysis System Institute Inc., Cary, NC., USA.

21:  Tadelle, D., Y. Alemu and K.J. Peters, 2000. Indigenous chickens in Ethiopia: Genetic potential and attempts at improvement. World's Poult. Sci. J., 56: 45-54.
CrossRef  |  Direct Link  |  

22:  Tamzil, M.H., R.R. Noor, P.S. Hardjosworo, W. Manalu and C. Sumantri, 2014. Hematological response of chickens with different heat shock protein 70 genotypes to acute heat stress. Int. J. Poult. Sci., 13: 14-20.
CrossRef  |  Direct Link  |  

23:  Tamzil, M.H., R.R. Noor, P.S. Hardjosworo, W. Manalu and C. Sumantri, 2013. Acute heat stress responses of three lines of chickens with different Heat Shock Protein (HSP)-70 genotypes. Int. J. Poult. Sci., 12: 264-272.
CrossRef  |  Direct Link  |  

24:  Tamzil, M.H., R.R. Noor, P.S. Hardjosworo, W. Manalu and C. Sumantri, 2013. [Polymorphism of the heat shock protein 70 gene in Kampong, Arabic and commercial chickens]. Jurnal Veteriner, 14: 317-326, (In Indonesian).
Direct Link  |  

25:  Thutwa, K., S.J. Nsoso, P.M. Kgwatalala and J.C. Moreki, 2012. Comparative live weight, growth performance, feed intake, carcass traits and meat quality in two strains of Tswana chickens raised under intensive system in South East district of Botswana. Int. J. Applied Poult. Res., 1: 21-26.
Direct Link  |  

©  2020 Science Alert. All Rights Reserved