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Research Article
 

Carcass Protein Content and Growth Performance of Hubbard Broiler Influenced by Feeding Protein Levels During Summer Season



Bahram CHACHAR, Sarfaraz Ahmed BROHI, Maria Amir SOLANGI, Zohaib Ahmed BHUTTO, Amir Amanullah SOLANGI and Azizullah MEMON
 
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ABSTRACT

The impact of crude protein (CP) levels on carcass protein content and growth of broiler were examined. Day old (200) chicks with average live body weight 41.60 g were equally divided into four groups A, B, C and D, fed 17 (control), 20, 23 and 26% CP, respectively. Feed intake, live body weight, feed conversion ratio (FCR), carcass weight and carcass protein contents were investigated. Average daily weight gain was 33.4, 39.0, 43.9 and 44.4g/bird against the feed consumption of 76.1, 86.0, 93.4 and 89.1 g/bird, with FCR of 2.28, 2.20, 2.12 and 2.00 in group A, B, C and D, respectively. Carcass weight 778.0, 996.3, 1180 and 1190 g/bird, carcass protein content was 37, 41, 46 and 49%, in group A, B, C and D, respectively. Greater (p<0.01) carcass weight of 1180 and 1190 g/bird and carcass protein content 46, 49% was obtained from ration contained 23 or 26% CP, respectively compared to control. The total price per bird earned was Rs. 57.76, 67.24 75.24 and 76.32 against total cost of 54.16, 59.77, 67.24 and 69.59/bird, respectively. The broiler growth and carcass protein content improved significantly (p<0.01) by increasing level of CP. It is concluded that group A (17% CP) or group D (26% CP) were less economical against 23 and 20% CP levels where fairly higher income was earned. However, from nutritional point of view 26% CP contained ration produced high protein carcass.

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  How to cite this article:

Bahram CHACHAR, Sarfaraz Ahmed BROHI, Maria Amir SOLANGI, Zohaib Ahmed BHUTTO, Amir Amanullah SOLANGI and Azizullah MEMON, 2014. Carcass Protein Content and Growth Performance of Hubbard Broiler Influenced by Feeding Protein Levels During Summer Season. Pakistan Journal of Nutrition, 13: 404-408.

DOI: 10.3923/pjn.2014.404.408

URL: https://scialert.net/abstract/?doi=pjn.2014.404.408

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