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Research Article
 

Effect of Bee Honey in Safety and Storability of Beef Sausage



Rabaa A. Mohammed, Mashair A. Sulieman and Elgasim A. Elgasim
 
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ABSTRACT

The effect of bee honey addition on the safety and storability of beef sausage was evaluated. Beef sausage was processed by the addition of different concentrations (0.0, 2.5, 5.0 and 7.5%) of bee honey. The processed beef sausage was packaged in poly ethylene bags and refrigerated at 4°C±2 for up to 9 days. Several variables were determined, using subjective and objective measurements, to evaluate the effects of concentration of bee honey and storage periods on the quality attributes of the processed sausage. These included proximate composition, pH, Peroxide Value (PV), total viable count, total coliform, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and psycho trophic bacteria as well as sensory attributes of the sausage. The evaluations were carried out immediately after processing, three, six and nine days post processing. Among all treatments, the control sausage (0% bee honey) had the highest (P<0.05) PV, total viable count, total coliform, Escherichia coli, Staph aureus and psycho trophic bacteria. Sausage sample with 7.5% bee honey had the lowest (P<0.05) PV, total viable count, total coliform, Escherichia coli, Staph aureus and psycho trophic bacteria. Generally and regardless of storage period PV, total viable count, total coliform, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and psycho trophic bacteria decreased with the increase of bee honey concentrations added to the sausage. Incorporation of bee honey in sausage formulation led to substantial improvement in the sensorial and keeping qualities of beef sausage.

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  How to cite this article:

Rabaa A. Mohammed, Mashair A. Sulieman and Elgasim A. Elgasim, 2013. Effect of Bee Honey in Safety and Storability of Beef Sausage. Pakistan Journal of Nutrition, 12: 560-566.

DOI: 10.3923/pjn.2013.560.566

URL: https://scialert.net/abstract/?doi=pjn.2013.560.566

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