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Research Article
 

Bacterial Contamination in Processed Chicken Shawarma (Meat) Sold in Various Parts of Lahore, Pakistan



Farooq Ahmad, Saqlain Abbas, Zahid Ali Butt, Adnan Skhawat Ali, Rashid Mahmood, Maqsood Ahmad, Muhammad Farhan, Abdul Wahid, Muhammad Nawaz and Aqsa Iftikhar
 
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ABSTRACT

In this study bacterial flora of meat in chicken Shawarma (meat) were investigated from five different regions of Lahore. Samples were taken from internal and external part of Shwarma. The contamination was present in both external and internal part of meat. But external part was found to be little more contaminated as compared to internal part. Analysis of microbes includes E. coli, Salmonella, Aerobes and Coliforms. Microbs were found in order of Aerobes > E. coli > Salmonella there is not too much variation of contamination in different regions but there is variation among the number of bacteria. In every part Aerobes were in greater number as compared to E. coli and Salmonella. Shawarma analyzed from the Site III was more contaminated as compared to other sites. The external part of the product showed more microbial load as compared to internal part.

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  How to cite this article:

Farooq Ahmad, Saqlain Abbas, Zahid Ali Butt, Adnan Skhawat Ali, Rashid Mahmood, Maqsood Ahmad, Muhammad Farhan, Abdul Wahid, Muhammad Nawaz and Aqsa Iftikhar, 2013. Bacterial Contamination in Processed Chicken Shawarma (Meat) Sold in Various Parts of Lahore, Pakistan. Pakistan Journal of Nutrition, 12: 130-134.

DOI: 10.3923/pjn.2013.130.134

URL: https://scialert.net/abstract/?doi=pjn.2013.130.134

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