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Research Article
 

Potential of a Soft Spreadable Margarine Produced from Waste Chicken Fat and Corn Oil Catalyzed by the Thermomyces lanuginosus (Tl Im) Lipozyme



Afida Tasirin and Mamot Said
 
ABSTRACT

Low-fat bread spreads have become very popular since conventional spreads have been shown to be unhealthy due to high amounts of saturated fat and trans fatty acids. Two interesterified products, sample 16 (4% Thermomyces lanuginosus lipozyme, 4:1 molar ratio of chicken fat to corn oil and 42 h of interesterification at 50°C) and sample 17 (4% lipozyme, 2:1 molar ratio of chicken fat to corn oil and 42 h of interesterification at 30°C), were selected that had the highest Solid Fat Content (SFC) at 30°C. Both the samples contained high proportions of low melting triglycerides, which explains the lower melting temperatures (sample 16, -37.45°C to 31.40°C; sample 17, -39.78°C to 35.4°C) and crystallization temperatures (sample 16, 0.58°C to -38.90°C; sample 17, -2.45°C to -34.27°C for sample 17) and solid fat content (sample 16, 3.2% at 20°C; sample 17, 3.5% at 20°C). The enzymatic process caused the Free Fatty Acid (FFA) values to increase from 0.13-0.48% (sample 16) and 0.16-0.66% (sample 17). The final product (sample 16) had a smaller and less dense fat particle and is a low-cost alternative for soft spreads. The crystallization and melting properties of blends of chicken fat and corn oil result in a product that has a wide plastic range but still contains an unsaturated fatty acid content nearly equal to those based on plant sources.

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  How to cite this article:

Afida Tasirin and Mamot Said, 2012. Potential of a Soft Spreadable Margarine Produced from Waste Chicken Fat and Corn Oil Catalyzed by the Thermomyces lanuginosus (Tl Im) Lipozyme. Pakistan Journal of Nutrition, 11: 360-366.

DOI: 10.3923/pjn.2012.360.366

URL: https://scialert.net/abstract/?doi=pjn.2012.360.366

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