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Evaluating the Degradability of the Guava and Jack Fruit Leaves Using In sacco Technique and Three-step Techniques



Pramote Paengkoum, S. Traiyakun, J. Khotsakdee, S. Srisaikham and S. Paengkoum
 
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ABSTRACT

The aim of this research was to evaluate the digestibility of the Guava (Psidium guajava I.) and Jack fruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus Lamk) leaves, using in saaco (nylon bag) technique and a three-step techniques on microbial in the rumen. Three dairy cattle of 4-5 years old with an average BW of 475.5±20 kg each one fitted with a permanent rumen were used. The results have shown ruminal Dry matter and crude protein disappearances increased with rumen incubation time for all feedstuffs. Dry matter degradability in the rumen of Guava (Psidium guajava I.) were significantly higher (p<0.05) than Jack fruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus Lamk) respectively. The loss of DM by washing of Guava leaves was higher than Jack fruit. Similarly, the loss of CP by washing of Jack fruit was higher than guava leaves and degradability of water insoluble fraction Guava leaves was higher than Jack fruit. The results have illustrate with the intention of degradability in the rumen degradability of jack fruit were lower (p<0.05) than guava. Crude protein digestion in the intestinal of jack fruit was higher (p<0.05) than guava leaves. The proportion of CP digestion in the intestinal of guava were significantly higher (p<0.05) than jack fruit. Moreover, CP digestion in total tract of guava was higher (p<0.05) than that of Jack fruit. These results indicate that two locally leaves as alternative feed resources such as guava could substitution the alternative feedstuffs etc.

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  How to cite this article:

Pramote Paengkoum, S. Traiyakun, J. Khotsakdee, S. Srisaikham and S. Paengkoum, 2012. Evaluating the Degradability of the Guava and Jack Fruit Leaves Using In sacco Technique and Three-step Techniques. Pakistan Journal of Nutrition, 11: 16-20.

DOI: 10.3923/pjn.2012.16.20

URL: https://scialert.net/abstract/?doi=pjn.2012.16.20

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