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Research Article
 

Effect of Different Levels of Coriander Oil on Broiler Performance and Some Physiological Traits under Summer Condition



Essa H. Al-Mashhadani, Farah K. Al-Jaff, Sunbul J. Hamodi and Hanan E. Al-Mashhadani
 
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ABSTRACT

This study was conducted to investigate the potential effect of coriander oil on broiler performance and some physiological traits. One hundred and thirty five day-old broiler chicks were randomly assigned in to three dietary treatments with three replicate pens per treatment (15 birds/pen). Birds were fed experimental diets containing 0, 0.5 and 1% coriander oil. Feed and water were provided ad libitum during the six weeks experimental period. Performance parameter were measured weekly which include body weight, weight gain, feed consumption and feed conversion ratio. While, cholesterol and glucose were measured at the end of the study. Results showed that inclusion of 0.5% (T2) and 1% (T3) coriander oil significantly improve body weight, weight gain, feed intake and feed conversion ratio (g feed/g gain) significantly (p<0.05) than those of the control group. The inclusion of coriander oil at levels of 0.5% and 1% significantly (p<0.05) decreased plasma cholesterol and glucose. It could be concluded that the inclusion of coriander oil improve broiler performance and lower cholesterol and glucose levels. Therefore, it could be concluded that the inclusion of coriander oil in broiler diet during summer months have a beneficial effect on performance and physiological traits measured.

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  How to cite this article:

Essa H. Al-Mashhadani, Farah K. Al-Jaff, Sunbul J. Hamodi and Hanan E. Al-Mashhadani, 2011. Effect of Different Levels of Coriander Oil on Broiler Performance and Some Physiological Traits under Summer Condition. Pakistan Journal of Nutrition, 10: 10-14.

DOI: 10.3923/pjn.2011.10.14

URL: https://scialert.net/abstract/?doi=pjn.2011.10.14

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