Subscribe Now Subscribe Today
Research Article
 

Effect of Olive Leaf Extracts on the Growth and Metabolism of Two Probiotic Bacteria of Intestinal Origin



M.S.Y. Haddadin
 
Facebook Twitter Digg Reddit Linkedin StumbleUpon E-mail
ABSTRACT

The increase in viable cell numbers and the production of Short-Chain Fatty Acids (SCFA) by Bifidobacterium infantis and lactobacillus acidophilus-both of human intestinal origin-were measured over 16 h at 37oC in reconstituted skim-milk (100 g L-1) and skim-milk with one of three olive leaf extracts (water, ethanolic and methanolic extracts). The olive leaves were collected from a well known olive tree variety in Jordan (Nabali). All the three olive leaf extracts increased cell counts over the control with no extracts and the final values for SCFA, especially acetic acid secreted by L. acidophilus (1.84 gL-1), were significantly higher than those observed in milk alone. The ethanolic extract of olive leaves showed highest effect on cell count and SCFA production for both bacterial species. It is proposed that the polyphenol compounds in olive leaf extracts were responsible for the stimulation of probiotic bacteria growth and metabolism and that olive leaf extracts ingested in human diet might have the same effect on desirable components of the intestinal microflora. The results of the research will be used in functional food development and food preservation purposes. This research will create a market potential for a range of new health based food to maintain optimal human health. This research is the first attempt to produce fermented milk with olive leaf extracts.

Services
Related Articles in ASCI
Search in Google Scholar
View Citation
Report Citation

 
  How to cite this article:

M.S.Y. Haddadin , 2010. Effect of Olive Leaf Extracts on the Growth and Metabolism of Two Probiotic Bacteria of Intestinal Origin. Pakistan Journal of Nutrition, 9: 787-793.

DOI: 10.3923/pjn.2010.787.793

URL: https://scialert.net/abstract/?doi=pjn.2010.787.793

REFERENCES

1:  Alberto, M.R., C. Gomez-Cordoves and M.C.M. De Nadra, 2004. Metabolism of gallic acid and catechin by Lactobacillus hilgardi from wine. J. Agric. Food Chem., 52: 6465-6469.
CrossRef  |  Direct Link  |  

2:  Al-Qarawi, A.A., M.A. Al-Damegh and S.A. El-Mougy, 2002. Effect of freeze dried extract of Olea europaea on pituitary-thyroid axis in rats. Phytother. Res., 16: 286-287.
CrossRef  |  PubMed  |  

3:  Awaisheh, S.S., M.S.Y. Haddadin and R.K. Robinson, 2004. Incorporation of selected nutraceuticals and probiotic bacteria into a fermented milk. Int. Dairy J., 15: 1184-1190.
CrossRef  |  

4:  Bello, F.D., J. Walter, C. Hertel and W.P. Hammes, 2001. In vitro study of prebiotic properties of levan-type exopolysaccharides from lactobacilli and non-digestible carbohydrates using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Syst. Applied Microbiol., 24: 232-237.
CrossRef  |  Direct Link  |  

5:  Bisignano, G., A. Tomaino, R.L. Cascio, G. Crisafi, N. Uccella and A. Saija, 1999. On the in-vitro antimicrobial activity of oleuropein and hydroxytyrosol. J. Pharm. Phrmacol., 51: 971-974.
CrossRef  |  PubMed  |  Direct Link  |  

6:  Briante, R., M. Patumi, S. Tereziani, E. Bimuto, F. Febbraio and R. Nucci, 2002. Olea europaea L leaf extract and derivatives: Antioxidant properties. J. Agric. Food Chem., 50: 4934-4940.
CrossRef  |  PubMed  |  

7:  Cornu, M.C., A. Marchand, E. Meurville and J.M. Belin, 1984. Incidences des composes phenoliques sur des bacteries lactiques et acetiques isolees du vin. Sci. Aliment, 4: 73-79.

8:  De Leonardis, A., A. Acetini, G. Alfano, V. Macciola and G. Ranalli, 2008. Isolation of a hydroxytyrosol rich extract from olive leaves (Olea Europaea L.) and evaluation of its antioxidant properties and bioactivity. Eur. Food Res. Technol., 226: 653-659.
CrossRef  |  

9:  Duda-Chodak, A., T. Tarko and M. Statek, 2008. The effect of antioxidants on Lactobacillus casei cultures. Acta Sci. Pol., Technol. Aliment, 7: 39-51.
Direct Link  |  

10:  Fehri, B., J.M. Aiache, A. Memmi, S. Korbi, M.T. Yacoubi, S. Mrad and J.L. Lamaison, 1994. Hypotension, hypoglycemia and hypouricemia recorded after repeated administration of aqueous leaf extract of Olea europaea L. J. Pharm. Belg., 49: 101-108.
PubMed  |  

11:  Fuller, R., 1991. Probiotics in human medicine. Gut, 32: 439-442.
Direct Link  |  

12:  Haddadin, M.S.Y., S.S. Awaisheh and R.K. Robinson, 2004. The production of yoghurt with probiotic bacteria isolated from infants in Jordan. Pak. J. Nutr., 3: 290-293.
CrossRef  |  Direct Link  |  

13:  Haddadin, M.S.Y., I. Nazer, S.J.A. Raddad and R.K. Robinson, 2007. Effect of honey on the growth and metabolism of two bacterial species of intestinal origin. Pak. J. Nutr., 6: 693-697.
CrossRef  |  Direct Link  |  

14:  Hara, Y., 1997. Influence of tea catechins on the digestive tract. J. Cell. Biochem., 27: 52-58.
CrossRef  |  PubMed  |  Direct Link  |  

15:  Khayyal, M.T., M.A. El-Ghazaly, D.M. Abdallah, N.N. Nassar, S.N. Okpanyi and M.H. Kreuter, 2002. Blood pressure lowering effect of an olive leaf extract (Olea europaed) in L-NAME induced hypertension in rats. Arzneimittelforschung, 52: 797-802.
CrossRef  |  Direct Link  |  

16:  Kim, S., C. Ruengwilysup and D.Y. Fung, 2004. Antimicrobial effect of water-soluble tea extracts on foodborne pathogens in laboratory medium and in a food model. J. Food Prot., 67: 2608-2612.
CrossRef  |  PubMed  |  

17:  Lee-Huang, S., L. Zhang, P.L. Huang, Y.T. Chang and P.L. Huang, 2003. Anti-HIV activity of Olive Leaf Extract (OLE) and modulation of host cell gene expression by HIV-1 infection and OLE treatment. Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun., 307: 1029-1037.
CrossRef  |  PubMed  |  Direct Link  |  

18:  Lee, H.C., A.M. Jenner, C.S. Low and Y.K. Lee, 2006. Effect of tea phenolics and their aromatic fecal bacterial metabolites on intestinal microbiota. Res. Microbiol., 157: 876-884.
CrossRef  |  PubMed  |  Direct Link  |  

19:  Mobe, K., M. Yamado, I. Oguni and T. Takahashi, 1999. In vitro and in vivo activities of tea catechin against Helicobacter pylori. Antimicrob. Agents. Chemother., 43: 1788-1791.
PubMed  |  Direct Link  |  

20:  Manna C., P. Galletti, V. Cucciolla, G. Montedoro and V. Zappia, 1999. Olive oil hydroxyltyrosol protects human erythrocytes against oxidative damages-possible role in cancer. J. Nutr. Biochem., 10: 159-165.
CrossRef  |  Direct Link  |  

21:  Marsili, R.T., H. Ostapenko, R.E. Simmons and D.E. Green, 1981. High performance liquid chromatographic determination of organic acids in dairy products. J. Food Sci., 46: 52-57.
CrossRef  |  

22:  Garcia, A.I.M., A. Moumen, D.R.Y. Ruiz and E.M. Alcaide, 2003. Chemical composition and nutrients availability for goats and sheep of two-stage olive cake and olive leaves. Anim. Feed Sci. Technol., 107: 61-74.
CrossRef  |  Direct Link  |  

23:  Medina, E., A. de Castro, C. Romero and M. Brenes, 2006. Comparison of the concentrations of phenolic compounds in olive oils and other plant oils: Correlation with antimicrobial activity. J. Agric. Food Chem., 54: 4954-4961.
CrossRef  |  PubMed  |  

24:  Molan, A.L., J. Flanagan, W. Wei and P.J. Moughan, 2009. Selenium-containing green tea has higher antioxidant and prebiotic activities than regular green tea. Food Chem., 114: 829-835.
CrossRef  |  Direct Link  |  

25:  Nagayama, K., Y. Iwamura, T. Shibata, I. Hirayama and T. Nakamura, 2002. Bacterial activity of phlorotannins from the brown alga Ecklonia kurome. J. Antimicrob. Chemother, 50: 889-893.
CrossRef  |  PubMed  |  Direct Link  |  

26:  Owen, R.W., R. Haubner, G. Wurtele, E. Hull, B. Spiegelhalder and H. Bartsch, 2004. Olives and olive oil in cancer prevention. Eur. J. Cancer Prev., 13: 319-326.
PubMed  |  Direct Link  |  

27:  Parrett, A.M. and C.A. Edwards, 1997. In vitro fermentation of carbohydrate by breast fed and formula fed infants. Arch. Dis. Childhood, 79: 249-253.
CrossRef  |  

28:  Pereira, A.P., I.C. Ferreira, F. Marcelino, P. Valentao and P.B. Andrade et al., 2007. Phenolic compounds and antimicrobial activity of olive (Olea europaea L. cv Cobrancosa) Leaves. Molecules, 12: 1153-1162.
PubMed  |  

29:  Quiles, J.L., A.J. Farquharson, D.K. Simpson, I. Grant and K.W.J. Wahle, 2002. Olive oil phenolics: Effects on DNA Oxidation and redox enzyme mRNA in prostate cells. Br. J. Nutr., 88: 225-234.
PubMed  |  

30:  Reguant, C., A. Bordons, L. Arola and N. Rozes, 2000. Influence of phenolic compounds on the physiology of Oenococcus oeni. J. Applied Microbiol., 88: 1065-1071.
CrossRef  |  PubMed  |  Direct Link  |  

31:  Roberfroid, M.B., 2000. Prebiotics and probiotics: Are they functional foods? Am. J. Clin. Nutr., 71: 1682S-1687S.
Direct Link  |  

32:  Ryan, D. and K. Robards, 1998. Phenolic compounds in olives. Critical review. The Analyst (May), 123: 31R-44R.
CrossRef  |  

33:  SAS, 2000. The SAS System for Windows. Version 7, SAS Institute, Cary, NC

34:  Singleton, V.L., R. Orthofer and R.M. Lamuela-Raventos, 1999. Analysis of total phenols and other oxidation substrates and antioxidants by means of Folin-Ciocalteu reagent. Methods Enzymol., 299: 152-178.
CrossRef  |  Direct Link  |  

35:  Somova, L.I., F.O. Shode, P. Ramnanan and A. Nadar, 2003. Antihypertensive, antiatherosclerotic and antioxidant activity of triterpenoids isolated from Olea europaea, subspecies africana leaves. J. Ethnopharmacol., 84: 299-305.
CrossRef  |  PubMed  |  Direct Link  |  

36:  Stead, D., 1994. The effect of chlorogenic, gallic and quinic acids on the growth of spoilage strains of Lactobacillus collinoides and Lactobacillus brevis. Lett. Applied Microbiol., 18: 112-114.
CrossRef  |  

37:  Topping, D.L. and P.M. Clifton, 2001. Short-chain fatty acids and human colonic function: Roles of resistant starch and non-starch polysaccharides. Physiol. Rev., 81: 1031-1064.
PubMed  |  

38:  Tuck, K.L. and P.J. Hayball, 2002. Major phenolic compounds in olive oil: Metabolism and health effects. J. Nutr. Biochem., 13: 636-644.
CrossRef  |  PubMed  |  Direct Link  |  

39:  Ustunol, Z., 2000. The effect of honey on the growth of Bifidobacteria. Summary of a Research Project Funded by the National Honey Board and Conducted at Michigan State University. http://www.honey.com/images/downloads/bifidobacteria.pdf.

40:  Visioli, F. and C. Galli, 2002. Biological properties of olive oil phytochemicals. Crit. Rev. Food Sci. Nutr., 42: 209-221.
CrossRef  |  PubMed  |  Direct Link  |  

41:  Vissers, M.N., P.L. Zock, A.J. Roodenburg, R. Leenen and M.B. Katan, 2002. Olive oil phenols are absorbed in human. J. Nutr., 132: 409-417.
PubMed  |  Direct Link  |  

42:  Vivas, N., A. Lonvaud-Funel and Y. Glories, 1997. Effect of phenolic acids and anthocyanins on growth, viability and malolactic activity of a lactic acid bacterium. Food Microbiol., 14: 291-300.
CrossRef  |  

©  2022 Science Alert. All Rights Reserved