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Research Article
 

Performance of Different Grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf.) Genotypes on Sour Orange (Citrus aurantium L.) Rootstock under the Climatic Conditions of Peshawar



Ghulam Nabi, Tasleem Jan , Sharafat Gul , Nadia Kanwal and Umer Rahim
 
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ABSTRACT

Eight grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf.) genotypes namely Ruby Red, Red Blush, Marsh JBC-430, Reed, Red Mexican, Shamber, White-I local and White-II local on sour orange (Citrus aurantium L.) rootstock were planted at Agriculture Research Institute Tarnab, Peshawar, Pakistan during the year 1996. These genotypes were evaluated for fruit maturity, fruit weight, fruit volume, number of seeds per fruit, number of segments per fruit, juice percentage, rind percentage, fruit texture, rind colour, pulp weight, Total Soluble Solids, acidity percentage, reducing sugar, non-reducing sugar, sugar acid ratio, total sugar percentage and vitamin C content during the year 2003-04. The fruit of Ruby Red matured earliest (last week of November). Red Blush, Red Mexican, Shamber and White-I matured in the first week of December while Marsh JBC-430, Reed and White-II matured in the second week of December. Maximum fruit weight was observed in Red Mexican (506 g) and also had maximum fruit volume (600.0 cm3). Ruby Red, Reed, Red Mexican and Shamber had smooth and dotted fruit texture. While fruits of Red Blush and Marsh-JBC-430 had smooth texture and White-I and White-II had rough and dotted texture. Reed, Shamber, Red Blush, Ruby Red and Red Mexican had greenish yellow rind colour while Marsh-JBC.430, White-I and White-II had yellow rind colour. The maximum number of seeds per fruit were found in Ruby Red (54.67) and Red Blush (54.00) while the minimum number of seeds were found in White-I (3.66). Maximum number of segments per fruit were found in Ruby Red (14.67) followed by White-II (14.00) and the minimum number of segments were found in Reed (12.00). Maximum juice percentage was found in Red Blush (57.25) and Ruby Red (52.25) and the minimum juice percentage was observed in White-II (26.78). The maximum rind percentage was found in White-II (43.46%) and the minimum rind percentage was found in Ruby Red (26.9 7%). Pulp weight were maximum in Red. Mexican (85.23 g) followed by Reed (83.10 g) and pulp weight was minimum in Marsh-JBC.430 (51.10 g). Total soluble solids were maximum in Red Mexican (10.30 Brix) and minimum in Ruby Red. (7.66 Brix°). The maximum acidity was found in White-II (2.32%) and the minimum acidity was found in Red Mexican (0.85%). Maximum reducing sugars were found in Red Blush (4.25%) and Shamber (4.24%) and minimum reducing sugar was found in White-II (2.76%). Total sugars were maximum in Ruby Red (6.43%) and Red Blush (6.28%) and minimum in Red Mexican (3.46%). Non-reducing sugar was maximum in Ruby Red (2.81%) and minimum in Red. Mexican (0.23%). Maximum sugar-acid ratio was found in Ruby Red (7.34%) and Red Blush (5.34%). Red Blush (58.17) and White-II (55.23) had maximum vitamin C and White-I (42.28) had minimum vitamin C.

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  How to cite this article:

Ghulam Nabi, Tasleem Jan , Sharafat Gul , Nadia Kanwal and Umer Rahim , 2004. Performance of Different Grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf.) Genotypes on Sour Orange (Citrus aurantium L.) Rootstock under the Climatic Conditions of Peshawar. Pakistan Journal of Biological Sciences, 7: 1762-1766.

DOI: 10.3923/pjbs.2004.1762.1766

URL: https://scialert.net/abstract/?doi=pjbs.2004.1762.1766

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