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Research Article
 

The Determination of Thiourea and Nickel Cloride LC50 Concentration on the Species of Acanthodiaptomus denticornis and Cyclops vicinus (Copepoda)



Ayda Tellioglu and Dursun Sen
 
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ABSTRACT

In this study search for LC50 concentration thiourea and nickel chloride (cancerogen) on Acanthodiaptomus denticornis and Cyclops vicius (Copepoda) have been investigated. A solution in different concentration has been put into an environment of, 15 cc containing 10 individual and by observing for 24 h, the death rate has been investigated and by using the control group, 15 sperate test have been made for each different test and by having the varage number of them, the death rate in each concentration has been calculated. As a result the LC50 concentration has been determined.

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  How to cite this article:

Ayda Tellioglu and Dursun Sen, 2003. The Determination of Thiourea and Nickel Cloride LC50 Concentration on the Species of Acanthodiaptomus denticornis and Cyclops vicinus (Copepoda). Pakistan Journal of Biological Sciences, 6: 493-495.

DOI: 10.3923/pjbs.2003.493.495

URL: https://scialert.net/abstract/?doi=pjbs.2003.493.495

Introduction

Metal concentrations may be elevated in the aquatic environment due to human activity. Natural populations in polluted areas are thus subjected to selective pressures to develop increased resistance to these metals (Klerks and Weis, 1993a; Bachiorri et al., 1991; Klerks and Levinton, 1993b). The ultimate aim of ecotoxicological studies is to predict how natural populations respond to contaminant exposure. In this context it is often assumed that laboratory and field organisms will respond identically towards a certain contaminant. Chapman (1983) identified acclimation and adaptation as factors that may produce differences in tolerance in laboratory tests are conducted with non-acclimated organisms.

Now-a-days, canserogen substances are quite important for human health and increased day by day. These substances can be taken either directly or through food.

Studies about effect on aquatic organisms species of some metals have been by Barata et al. (2002), Blackmore and Wang (2002), Vigano (2000), Bagarinao (1992), Münzinger and Monicelli (1992).

Now a days, canserogen substances are quite important for human health and increased day by day. These substances can be taken either directly or through food chian by human.

The canserogen substances in food are becoming to be quite dangerous risk factor for human life. The high solubility of Thiourea and Nickel chloride in cold water makes important aspect for us to study Acanthodiaptomus denticornis and Cyclops vicinus species which are important foods for fishes.

Materials and Methods

Adults of Acanthodiaptomus denticornis and Cyclops vicinus were used in experiments. Concentration by degrees raised. Experiment medium that ten placed 15 cc substance. Every concentration were agained, 15 time. For every concentration were used group control non canserogen substances also.

Complete of experiments were did in rom hot and adult Copepoda growed in laboratory and collect from Hazar Lake. For every concentration established average death measure after 24 h. LC50 estimate did with regression analysis.

Death number and Thiourea concentrations used for Acanthodiaptomus denticornis species given, in below.

Results

Concentration for Acanthodiaptomus denticornis species began 0,0012 thiourea and 0,00003 Nickel chloride (Table 1-4).

Table 1:Regression straight of Thiourea to Acanthodiaptomus denticornis species



Table 2:Regression straight of Nickel clorür to Acanthodiaptomus denticornis species
b=1.2              a=3.7



Table 3:Regression straight of Thiourea to Cyclops vicinus species
b = 2.7               a = 1.5



Table 4:Regression straight of Nickel clorür to Cyclops vicinus species


According to death rates, concentration increased periodical. LC50 concentration for Acanthodiaptomus denticornis established 0,01862 thiourea and 0,000825 Nickel chloride.

Concentration for Cyclops vicinus species began 0,0013 thiourea and 0,00004 Nickel chloride. According to death rates, concentration increased periodical. LC50 concentration for Cyclops vicinus established 0,00646 thiourea and 0,000363 Nickel chloride.

REFERENCES
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