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Arsenic and Antimony in Drinking Water in Khohsorkh Area, Northeast Iran Possible Risks for the Public Health



Ghassemzadeh Fereshteh , Arbab-Zavar , Mohhamad Hosein and McLennan Geoffrey
 
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ABSTRACT

This is the first study on antimony and arsenic contaminations of Kohsorkh area, northeast, Iran. These contaminants originate from weathering and alteration of rocks and leach into ground and surface water (geogenic exposure). Participants (200) from four villages in the study area with 3287 population were interviewed for history, diet and general health. Causes of death in the area were collected from the standard certificate that is issued by the department of health. The antimony and arsenic content in their current primary drinking water source was measured. The contamination levels for antimony and arsenic varied from 11.4 to 127.1 μg L-1 and 37.4 to 376 μg L-1, respectively. In highly affected area the concentration of surface water used directly as drinking water had an average concentration of 71.75 μg L-1 for antimony and 191.92 μg L-1 for arsenic. Antimony and arsenic analysis of tap water from houses in the study area were 35.8 to 79.3 μg L-1, respectively. Antimony and arsenic concentrations are higher than the standards for drinking waters which are 18 and 30 times more than WHO recommendations, 6 and 10 μg L-1 for antimony and arsenic respectively. This study indicates that the people in the villages in Kohsorkh area might be at a considerable risk of chronic arsenic and antimony poisoning. It is also add to evidence that long term ingestion of inorganic arsenic and antimony can increase the mortality due to cancer. However, there was not recorded any death due to the skin cancer in the area during the time of this study.

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  How to cite this article:

Ghassemzadeh Fereshteh , Arbab-Zavar , Mohhamad Hosein and McLennan Geoffrey , 2006. Arsenic and Antimony in Drinking Water in Khohsorkh Area, Northeast Iran Possible Risks for the Public Health. Journal of Applied Sciences, 6: 2705-2714.

DOI: 10.3923/jas.2006.2705.2714

URL: https://scialert.net/abstract/?doi=jas.2006.2705.2714

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