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Research Article
 

Manual Egg Turning is Necessary for Optimal Hatching in Geese



Attila Salamon and John P. Kent
 
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ABSTRACT

Egg turning is a vital part of the incubation process in many bird species. However, the quality and quantity of turning can differ between species. Commercial incubators with domestic fowl automatically move the eggs that are set pointed end down, 45° either side from the vertical every hour. However, goose eggs are not set pointed end down vertically, but horizontally with the long axis parallel to the horizontal plain, i.e., laid flat on wire trays and turned as described above. With this method of incubation the down side of the goose egg will not find itself facing upwards during the incubation process if the eggs do not get additional hand turning. It was suggested (Bogenfurst, 2004) that goose eggs lying flat as above but at an angle of 45- 60° on the trays, do not require manual turning. This study used eggs from one year old geese that were in addition hand turned (around the short or the long axis of the egg by 180°) once per day from d 10-26 of incubation. Turning was in the opposite manner on alternative days. Their hatchability was compared with eggs that had no hand turning. Fertility was >85.42% in all egg Groups. Overall, the hatchability of fertile goose eggs in Group C (no manual turning; 44.12%) was significantly lower than those of Groups A (manual turning around long axis; 63.77%; p = 0.002) and B (manual turning around short axis; 61.94%; p = 0.005). Manual turning did increased the hatchability of goose eggs with no significant difference between the short or long axis turning Groups.

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  How to cite this article:

Attila Salamon and John P. Kent, 2016. Manual Egg Turning is Necessary for Optimal Hatching in Geese. International Journal of Poultry Science, 15: 57-61.

DOI: 10.3923/ijps.2016.57.61

URL: https://scialert.net/abstract/?doi=ijps.2016.57.61

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