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Research Article
 

Effects of Adding Different Dietary Levels of Garlic (Allium sativum) Powder on Productive Performance and Egg Quality of Laying Hens



Abdulaziz A. Al Aqil
 
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ABSTRACT

The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of adding different dietary levels of garlic (0, 0.4, 0.8, 1.0%) powder on productive performance and egg quality of laying hens from 52 to 60 weeks of age. Two hundred 52 week old Hisex laying hens were randomly distributed among four treatments with ten replicates with five hens per each replicate. Body weight gain, egg production, feed consumption, feed conversion ratio, egg weight, egg mass, egg specific gravity, Haugh units and egg yolk color were measured. Results showed no significant effects on body weight gain, egg weight and Haugh unit for hens fed diets containing 0, 0.4, 0.8, or 1.0% garlic powder. Feed consumption and egg production of hens fed diets containing 0.8 and 1.0% decreased significantly than those fed diets containing 0 and 0.4% garlic powder. Hens fed diets containing 0.4, 0.8 and 1.0% garlic powder showed lower (better) feed conversion ratio and lower egg yolk color than those fed diets containing 0.0% garlic powder. In addition, hens fed diets containing 0.4, 0.8 and 1.0% garlic powder showed higher egg mass than those fed diets containing 0.0% garlic powder. Hens fed diets containing 0.8% garlic powder showed higher egg specific gravity than those fed diets containing 0.0% garlic powder. It was concluded that adding 1.0% garlic powder into laying hen diets had some positive effects on productive performance and egg quality parameters from 52 to 60 weeks of age.

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  How to cite this article:

Abdulaziz A. Al Aqil , 2016. Effects of Adding Different Dietary Levels of Garlic (Allium sativum) Powder on Productive Performance and Egg Quality of Laying Hens. International Journal of Poultry Science, 15: 151-155.

DOI: 10.3923/ijps.2016.151.155

URL: https://scialert.net/abstract/?doi=ijps.2016.151.155

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