Subscribe Now Subscribe Today
Research Article
 

Acute Heat Stress Responses of Three Lines of Chickens with Different Heat Shock Protein (HSP)-70 Genotypes



M.H. Tamzil, R.R. Noor, P.S. Hardjosworo, W. Manalu and C. Sumantri
 
Facebook Twitter Digg Reddit Linkedin StumbleUpon E-mail
ABSTRACT

An experiment was conducted to study the response of three chicken lines with different HSP 70 genotypes to acute heat stress. Twenty eight kampong chicken (native chicken, with seven genotypes i.e., AA, AB, AC, CC, AD, DD and BC) and twenty four Arabic chicken (with six genotypes i.e., AA, AB, AC, CC, AD and BC) and four commercial chickens (with one genotype i.e., DD) were used and randomly allocated in a factorial arrangement into groups which their HSP 70 genotypes had been identified. Acute heat stress was exposed at 40°C for 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 h, respectively, using chamber in 33 x 33 x 75 cm3. Parameters measured were the onset of panting (minute), panting frequency (times/minute), feed consumption (g/minute), water consumption (mL/minute), manure water content (%), rectal temperature (°C), serum corticosterone concentration (μg/dL) and HSP 70 expression (copy mRNA). The result of this study showed that there was an interaction between chicken lines and acute heat stress exposure on water consumption and manure water content. Chicken lines affected panting frequencies and manure water content but it did not affect the onset of panting, feed and water consumptions, rectal temperature, serum corticosterone concentration and expression of HSP 70. Acute heat stress increased panting frequency, drinking water consumption, manure water content, rectal temperature, serum corticosterone concentration, HSP 70 expression and it decreased feed consumption. The highest response on panting frequency, rectal temperature, serum corticosterone concentration and expression of HSP 70 was found in the DD genotype and the lowest in AD genotype. The most rapid onset of panting occurred in DD genotype and the slowest in AD genotype. The study revealed interaction between chicken lines and HSP 70 genotypes in heat resistance. Kampong chicken had the highest heat resistance as compared to Arabic and commercial chickens but HSP 70 genotypes that was the most tolerant to high ambient temperature was AD genotype where as the lowest tolerant was DD genotype.

Services
Related Articles in ASCI
Search in Google Scholar
View Citation
Report Citation

 
  How to cite this article:

M.H. Tamzil, R.R. Noor, P.S. Hardjosworo, W. Manalu and C. Sumantri, 2013. Acute Heat Stress Responses of Three Lines of Chickens with Different Heat Shock Protein (HSP)-70 Genotypes. International Journal of Poultry Science, 12: 264-272.

DOI: 10.3923/ijps.2013.264.272

URL: https://scialert.net/abstract/?doi=ijps.2013.264.272

REFERENCES

1:  Ajakaiye, J.J., J.O. Ayo and S.A. Ojo, 2010. Effects of heat stress on some blood parameters and egg production of Shika Brown layer chickens transported by road. Biol. Res., 43: 183-189.
CrossRef  |  Direct Link  |  

2:  Al-Aqil, A. and I. Zulkifli, 2009. Changes in heat shock protein 70 expression and blood characteristics in transported broiler chickens as affected by housing and early age feed restriction. Poult. Sci., 88: 1358-1364.
CrossRef  |  Direct Link  |  

3:  Al-Fataftah, A.R.A. and Z.H.M. Abu-Dieyeh, 2007. Effect of chronic heat stress on broiler performance in Jordan. Int. J. Poult. Sci., 6: 64-70.
CrossRef  |  Direct Link  |  

4:  Zahraa and H. Al-Ghamdi, 2008. Effects of commutative heat stress on immunoresponses in broiler chickens reared in closed system. Int. J. Poult. Sci., 7: 964-968.
CrossRef  |  Direct Link  |  

5:  Altan, O., A. Altan, M. Cabuk and H. Bayraktar, 2000. Effects of heat stress on some blood parameters in broilers. Turk. J. Vet. Anim. Sci., 24: 145-148.
Direct Link  |  

6:  Assenmacher, I., 1973. The Peripheral Endocrine Glands. In: Avian Biology, Farmer, D.S. and J.R. King (Eds.). Vol. 3, Academic Press, New York pp: 186-286

7:  Berne, R.M. and M.N. Levy, 1990. Principles of Physiology. C. V. Mosby Co., St. Louis, MO

8:  Collier, R.J., J.L. Collier, R.P. Rhoads and L.H. Baumgard, 2008. Invited review: Genes involved in the bovine heat stress response. J. Dairy Sci., 91: 445-454.
CrossRef  |  Direct Link  |  

9:  Cooper, M.A. and K.W. Washburn, 1998. The relationships of body temperature to weight gain, feed consumption and feed utilization in broilers under heat stress. Poult. Sci., 77: 237-242.
CrossRef  |  PubMed  |  Direct Link  |  

10:  Czaririck, M. and B.D. Fairchild, 2008. Poultry Housing for Hot Climates. In: Poultry Production in Hot Climates, Daghir, N.J. (Ed.). CABI, USA., pp: 81-131

11:  Etches, R.J., T.M. John and A.M. Verrinder Gibbins, 2008. Behavioural Physiological, Neuroendocrine and Molecular Responses to Heat Stress. In: Poultry Production in Hot Climates, Daghir, N.J. (Ed.). Cromwell Press, Trowbridge, pp: 49-69

12:  Ewing, S.A., D.C. Lay and E. Von Borell, 1999. Farm Animal Well-Being: Stress Physiology, Animal Behavior and Environmental Design. Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, New Jersey, ISBN-13: 9780136602002, Pages: 357

13:  Fumihito, A., T. Miyake, M. Takada, R. Shingu and M.T. Endo et al., 1996. Monophyletic origin and unique dispersal patterns of domestic fowls. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA., 93: 6792-6795.
Direct Link  |  

14:  Gabriel, J.E., J.A. Ferro, R.M.P. Stefani, M.I.T. Ferro, S.L. Gomes and M. Macari, 1996. Effect of acute heat stress on heat shock protein 70 messenger RNA and on heat shock protein expression in the liver of broilers. Br. Poult. Sci., 37: 443-449.
CrossRef  |  PubMed  |  Direct Link  |  

15:  Garriga, C., R.R. Hunter, C. Amat, J.M. Planas, M.A. Mitchell and M. Moreto, 2006. Heat stress increases apical glucose transport in the chicken jejunum. Am. J. Physio. Regul. Integer. Comp. Physiol., 290: 195-201.
PubMed  |  Direct Link  |  

16:  Gaviol, H.C.T., E. Gasparino, A.J. Prioli and M.A. Soares, 2008. Genetic evaluation of the HSP70 protein in the Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica). Genet. Mol. Res., 7: 133-139.
PubMed  |  

17:  Hilman, P.E., N.R. Scot and N.R.A. van Tienhoven, 2000. Physiological, Responses and Adaption to Hot and Cold Environments. In: Stress Physiology in Livestock: Poultry, Yousef, M.K. (Ed.). Vol. 3, CRC Press, Florida, pp: 1-71

18:  Lin, H., H.F. Zhang, R. Du, X.H. Gu, Z.Y. Zhang, J. Buyse and E. Decuypere, 2005. Thermoregulation responses of broiler chickens to humidity at different ambient temperatures. II. Four weeks of age. Poult. Sci., 84: 1173-1178.
CrossRef  |  PubMed  |  Direct Link  |  

19:  Mazzi, C.M., J.A. Ferro, M.I.T. Ferro, V.J.M. Savino, A.A.D. Coelho and M. Macari, 2003. Polymorphism analysis of the hsp70 stress gene in Broiler chickens (Gallus gallus) of different breeds. Genet. Mol. Biol., 26: 275-281.
CrossRef  |  Direct Link  |  

20:  Mahmoud, K.Z., F.W. Eden, E.J. Eisen and G.B. Havenstein, 2004. The effect of dietary phosphorus on heat shock protein mRNAs during acute heat stress in male broiler chickens (Gallus gallus). Comp. Biochem. Physiol. Part C: Toxicol. Pharmacol., 137: 11-18.
CrossRef  |  

21:  Nishida, T., Y. Hayashi, K. Nozawa, T. Hashiguchi and S.S. Mansjoer, 1988. Morphological studies on the Indonesian native chicken. Jap. J. Zootechn. Sci., 59: 1047-1058.
CrossRef  |  Direct Link  |  

22:  Puvadolpirod, S. and J.P. Thaxton, 2000. Model of physiological stress in chickens 1. Response parameters. Poult. Sci., 79: 363-369.
CrossRef  |  Direct Link  |  

23:  Puvadolpirod, S. and J.P. Thaxton, 2000. Model of physiological stress in chickens 3. Temporal patterns of response. Poult. Sci., 79: 377-382.
CrossRef  |  PubMed  |  Direct Link  |  

24:  Siegel, H.S., 1980. Physiological stress in birds. BioScience, 30: 529-534.
CrossRef  |  Direct Link  |  

25:  Sohail, M.U., A. Ijaz, M.S. Yousaf, K. Ashraf, H. Zaneb, M. Aleem and H. Rehman, 2010. Alleviation of cyclic heat stress in broilers by dietary supplementation of mannan-oligosaccharide and Lactobacillus-based probiotic: Dynamics of cortisol, thyroid hormones, cholesterol, C-reactive protein and humoral immunity. Poult. Sci., 89: 1934-1938.
CrossRef  |  PubMed  |  Direct Link  |  

26:  Spasojevi, N., L. Gavrilovi, I. Kovacevi and S. Dronjak, 2007. Endocrinological and behavioural effects of chronic fluxilan administration in rats. JMB, 26: 274-279.
CrossRef  |  

27:  Sullivan, D.A. and C.R. Wira, 1979. Sex hormone and glucocorticoid receptors in the bursa of Fabricius of immature chicks. J. Immunol., 122: 2617-2623.
Direct Link  |  

28:  Tamzil, M.H., R.R. Noor, P.S. Hardjosworo, W. Manalu and C. Sumantri, 2013. Polymorphism of the heat shock protein gene in kampong, arabic and commercial chickens. J. Vet., Vol. 14.

29:  Vahdatpour, T., K.N. Adl, Y.E. Nezhad, N.M. Sis, S.R. Riyazi and S. Vahdatpour, 2009. Effects of corticosterone intake as stress-alternative hormone on broiler chickens: Performance and blood parameters. Asian J. Anim. Vet. Adv., 4: 16-21.
CrossRef  |  Direct Link  |  

30:  Gabriel, J.E., J.A. Ferro, R.M.P. Stefani, M.I.T. Ferro, S.L. Gomes and M. Macari, 1996. Effect of acute heat stress on heat shock protein 70 messenger RNA and on heat shock protein expression in the liver of broilers. Br. Poult. Sci., 37: 443-449.
CrossRef  |  PubMed  |  Direct Link  |  

31:  Yu, J. and E. Bao, 2008. Effect of acute heat stress on heat shock protein 70 and its corresponding mRNA expression in the heart, liver and kidney of broilers. Asian-Aust. J. Anim. Sci., 21: 1116-1126.
CrossRef  |  Direct Link  |  

32:  Zhen, F.S., H.L. Du, H.P. Xu, Q.B. Luo and X.Q. Zhang, 2006. Tissue and allelic-specific expression of HSP 70 gene in chickens: Basal and heat-stress-induced mRNA level quantified with real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Br. Poul. Sci., 47: 449-455.
CrossRef  |  

33:  Zulkifli, I., A. Al-Aqil, A.R. Omar, A.Q. Sazili and M.A. Rajion, 2009. Crating and heat stress influence blood parameters and heat shock protein 70 expression in broiler chickens showing short or long tonic immobility reactions. Poult. Sci., 88: 471-476.
CrossRef  |  Direct Link  |  

©  2022 Science Alert. All Rights Reserved