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Articles by Mengistu Urge
Total Records ( 7 ) for Mengistu Urge
  Meseret Girma , Mengistu Urge and Getachew Animut
  One hundred and eighty 26-week old Bovans Brown commercial layers were used to determine the performance and economic of layers fed with ration containing Ground Prosopis Juliflora Pods (GPJP) at levels of 0 (T1), 10 (T2), 20 (T3) and 30% (T4) of the total ration. The experiment was arranged in a Completely Randomized Design (CRD) with four treatments, each replicated three times with 15 birds per replicate. The experiment lasted 12 weeks. Hens were individually weighed at the start and end of the experiment. Data on Dry Matter Intake (DMI), Hen Day Egg Production (HDEP), egg weight and egg mass were recorded daily. Egg quality parameters (egg shell weight and thickness, albumen weight and height, Haugh unit and egg yolk weight and color) were determined at an interval of 3 days on 6 eggs per replicate. GPJP contained 12.1% CP, 7.3% ether extract, 14.4% crude fiber and 82.3 μg/100 g beta-carotene. DMI and HDEP was lower (p<0.05) for T4 than T1 and T2 and that of egg mass was significantly lower (p<0.05) for T4 than T1 (DMI: 111.4, 111.8, 110.5 and 105.4 g/day (SEM = 1.92); HDEP: 67.2, 67.7, 62.7 and 60.0% (SEM = 0.02); egg mass: 44.0, 43.8, 41.3 and 39.6 g/day (SEM = 1.49) for T1, T2, T3 and T4, respectively). Body weight change and feed conversion ratio was not impacted (p>0.05) by treatment. Except for egg yolk color which was greater (p<0.05) for T4 than other treatments, all quality parameters were similar among treatments. Therefore, based on the results of the current study, the 10% GPJP inclusion level in the ration of layers is more economical. Although 30% GPJP inclusion level in the ration of layers improved egg yolk color and it appeared to result in reduction of egg production and egg mass. Therefore, up to 20% GPJP inclusion in layers ration is recommendable based on the performance of the birds, although the treatment with 10% GPJP in the ration seems to be more economical.
  Meseret Girma , Mengistu Urge and Getachew Animut
  Three hundred and ninety six Hubbard Classic commercial day old chicks were used to determine the performance of broilers fed ration containing ground Prosopis juliflora pods (GPJP) at inclusion levels of 0 (T1), 10 (T2), 20 (T3) and 30% (T4) of the total ration. The experiment was arranged in a completely randomized design with four treatments and three replications with 33 birds per replicate. Birds were weighed in group every 7 days to determine Average Daily Gain (ADG). Feed offered and refusals were recorded every day and Feed Intake (FI) was calculated as the difference between the two. Data on ADG, FI and Feed Conversion Ratio (FCR) were analyzed for starter (1-21 days) and finisher (22-45 days) phases separately as well as for the entire experiment period (45 days). At the end of the experiment, four randomly selected birds from each replicate were slaughtered and dressed to determine carcass characteristics. Feed Intake (FI) during finisher phase [3386, 3340, 3336 and 3280 g (SEM = 29.54)] and the entire experiment period [4369, 4321, 4313 and 4248 (SEM = 27.41)], final live weight at the end of starter, finisher and the entire experiment period, ADG [40.8, 41.2, 39.9 and 36.4 (SEM = 1.41)] for T1, T2, T3 and T4, respectively and FCR for the entire experiment period were significantly lower (p<0.05) in T4 than T1 and T2. Among carcass traits, drum stick weight was significantly lower (p<0.05) in T4 than T1 and T2, but esophagus and crop weight were higher (p<0.05) in T4 than other treatments. Ration consisting 20% GPJP resulted to the lowest feed cost per weight gain (10.58, 10.67, 10.53 and 10.60 for T1, T2, T3 and T4, respectively). The results of this study indicated that 30% GPJP inclusion negatively affected feed intake and growth and inclusion of GPJP at 10 and 20% level reduced feed cost without negative effect on biological performance as compared to the control. Therefore, about 20% of conventional broilers diet can be substituted by GPJP to reduce feed cost.
  Etalem Tesfaye , Getachew Animut , Mengistu Urge and Tadelle Dessie
  A total of 300 Hubbard Classic day-old broiler chicks were randomly distributed into 15 pens equally, representing 5 feeding treatments to evaluate the performance of chicks fed varying dietary levels of Moringa Olifera Leaf Meal (MOLM) replacing soybean meal (SBM) up to the age of 56 days. Treatments were inclusion of MOLM at 0 (T1), 5 (T2), 10 (T3), 15 (T4) and 20% (T5). Four birds 2 from each sex were randomly selected from each replication for carcass evaluation at the end of the study. From the same birds used for carcass evaluation, blood was taken for serum Total Cholesterol (TC) and Total Protein (TP) determination. The crude protein content of MOLM was 28%. Daily Dry Matter (DM) intake during the entire experimental period ranged 54 to 75 g/bird and was greater (P<0.05) for T1 than T3 and T5. Daily body weight gain for the entire experimental period were 29, 25, 22, 22 and 17g (SEM = 1.0) for T1, T2, T3, T4 and T5, respectively and values were greater for T1 as compared to T3, T4 and T5 but similar (P>0.05) with T2. Replacement of MOLM for SBM lowered (P<0.05) yield of most parameters such as dressed weight, eviscerated weight, breast weight, thigh weight, drumstick weight and giblet weight. Sex differences were significant in drumstick weight and drumstick and thigh percentages with greater values for males than females. Conversely, eviscerated percentage was greater (P<0.05) for females than males. Levels of TC and TP were greater for T3 than T1, T4 and T5 (P<0.05). However, differences in TC and TP levels due to sex were not significant (P>0.05). Depending on the production parameters measured, MOLM can be substituted to SBM in broilers diet up to a level of 5% inclusion in the total ration without negative effect on biological performance. Levels of MOLM substitution to SBM of 10-20% appeared to reduce growth rate but did not have an adverse effect on the health of birds, indicating the potential of the plant as an alternative feed ingredient in poultry feeding.
  Etalem Tesfaye , Getachew Animut , Mengistu Urge and Tadelle Dessie
  A total of 300 day-old Hubbard Classic broiler chicks with initial body weight (BW) of 43.6±1.33 (mean±SD) were randomly and equally distributed into 15 pens, representing five feeding treatments with three replication per treatment to evaluate the performance of chicks fed varying dietary levels of cassava root chips (CRC) replacing corn grain (CG). Treatments were replacement of CG with CRC at 0 (T1), 25 (T2), 50 (T3), 75 (T4) and 100% (T5) levels. Isocaloric and isonitrogenous starter and finisher rations were used. Four birds 2 from each sex were randomly taken from each replication and slaughtered for carcass evaluation at the end of the study. The metabolizable energy content of CRC and CG were 3852 and 3753 kcal/kg dry matter (DM), respectively. Daily DM intake during the entire experimental period ranged 61 to 67 g/bird and was greater (P<0.05) for T5 than T3 and T4, while values for T1 was similar with other treatments. Change in BW, daily BW gain and DM conversion efficiency were similar (P>0.05) among treatments. Replacement of CRC for CG at higher levels (75 and 100%) lowered (P<0.05) yield of most carcass parameters such as slaughter weight, dressed weight, eviscerated weight, breast weight, thigh weight, drumstick weight and giblet weight. The same carcass parameters were greater (P<0.05) for male than female birds but abdominal fat percentage was higher for females. In conclusion, based on DM intake and growth performance of broilers obtained in this study, CRC could completely replace corn grain in broiler diets as energy feed ingredient. However, looking on the results of yields of major carcass parameters, CRC should substitute corn grain not more than 50%.
  Yeshambel Mekuriaw , Mengistu Urge and Getachew Animut
  This study evaluated the feeding value of Lowland Bamboo Leaf Hay (LBLH) as basal diet when offered sole or in mixture with Natural Pasture Grass Hay (NPGH). Thirty local ‘Washera’ yearling male lambs with initial body weight of 23.8±1.35 kg (mean±SD) were grouped into six blocks of five animals and randomly assigned to five dietary treatments consisting of NPGH and LBLH at a ratio of 100:0 (T1), 75:25 (T2), 50:50 (T3), 25:75 (T4) and 0:100% (T5), respectively. The basal diets were fed ad libitum and all animals received 150 g Dry Matter (DM) Noug Seed Meal (NSM)/day. The study consisted of 90 days growth and 7 days digestibility trials. Rumen fluid was sampled at the end for pH and ammonia nitrogen determination. The Crude Protein (CP) level in NPGH, LBLH and NSM were 73, 111 and 322 g/kg DM, respectively. Total DM intake [705, 704, 644, 691 and 649 g/day (SEM = 3.1)] was similar (p>0.05) and CP intake [90, 99, 99, 103 and 109 for T1, T2, T3, T4 and T5, respectively (SEM = 0.9)] differ (p<0.05) among treatments. Digestibility coefficient of DM was similar among treatments and that of CP was in the order of T1 < T2 = T3 = T4 < T5 (p<0.001). Ruminal ammonia concentration was in the order of T5 > T4 > T3 > T2 = T1 (p<0.05). Average daily gain [25, 24, 25, 31 and 37 g/day (SEM = 1.1)] and feed conversion efficiency [0.035, 0.034, 0.038, 0.045 and 0.057 for T1, T2, T3, T4 and T5, respectively (SEM = 0.040)] were greater (p<0.05) for T5 as compared to T1, T2 and T3 and values for T4 was similar with all other treatments. In conclusion LBLH had a relatively better feeding value as compared to the NPGH used in this study and hence can be a good substitute to hay especially in the dry season when conventional roughages are in short supply and low in CP content.
  Tsegay Teklebrhan , Mengistu Urge and Yoseph Mekasha
  A study was conducted to evaluate carcass measurement, conformation and composition of local [Blackhead Ogaden (B1) and Hararghe highland (B2)] and cross breed [Dorper x Blackhead Ogaden (B3) and Dorper x Hararghe highland (B4)] F1 lambs at two levels of concentrate supplement. The two diets were native grass hay ad libtum + 150 g concentrate mix [D1 (low level), Wheat Bran (WB) and Noug Seed Cake (NSC), at a ratio of 2:1] and native grass hay ad libtum + 350 g concentrate mix (D2, high level) in stall feeding. The experiment was arranged in a completely randomized design in a factorial arrangement (four breeds and two levels of diet). B4 had (p<0.05) longer hind leg posterior buttock circumference, thoracic circumference and chest width than B2, but did not differ from B1. Lambs fed high level of concentrate supplement have longer leg length wider posterior and anterior buttock circumference, buttock and chest width than low level concentrate supplemented groups. The fat content of both cross breeds is lower compared to pure Blackhead Ogaden. Leaner carcass was harvested from lambs consumed low level of concentrate supplement compared to lambs consumed high level of concentrate supplement. Result suggests that crossing Dorper with pure Hararghe highland improved carcass measurement and conformation. However, pure Blackhead Ogaden tended to perform similar to crosses in some parameters measured indicating the possibility of improving this breed without cross breeding. The result also noted that good nutrient supply is necessary for better carcass measurement and conformation.
  Meseret Girma , Mengistu Urge and Getachew Animut
  Three hundred and ninety six Hubbard Classic commercial day old chicks were used to determine the effect of Ground Prosopis juliflora Pods (GPJP) inclusion in broilers ration at levels of 0 (T1), 10 (T2), 20 (T3) and 30% (T4) on chemical and fatty acid composition, meat sensory quality and hematological status of birds. The birds were fed with the rations for 45 days. The experiment was arranged in a Completely Randomized Design (CRD) with four treatments, each replicated three times with 33 birds per replicate. Data of feed intake was recorded every day. The amount of nutrients consumed was determined as the difference between nutrients offered and refused on Dry Matter (DM) basis. At the end of the experiment, four randomly selected birds from each replicate (12 per treatment) were slaughtered by severing jugular vein and free flow of blood was collected into labeled sterile universal bottles. The birds were dressed by hand, carcass parts dissected, individually weighed and breast and thigh muscles were deboned and kept in refrigerator at -20°C for determination of chemical and fatty acids composition and evaluation of sensory characteristics. Intakes of DM in finisher, crude protein during starter and finisher, crude fiber in starter and finisher, ether extract during starter, ash intake during starter and finisher phases were significantly different (p<0.05) among the treatments. Except crude fiber intake, which increased with increasing level of GPJP, the intake of the other nutrients decreased as the inclusion level of GPJP increased. There was no adverse effect of feeding GPJP on the chemical and fatty acid composition and sensory characteristics of breast and thigh meat of broiler. Monocyte percentage of broilers was significantly higher in treatment consumed ration containing the highest GPJP as compared to the control and other treatment groups (p<0.05). Other Hematological parameters were not influenced by the levels of GPJP in the ration (p>0.05). Intestine of birds at higher level of inclusion (30% GPJP) showed minor lesions, which could be attributed to coccidiosis infection encountered during the experiment. This study indicated that up to 30% inclusion of GPJP in broiler diet did not altered chemical and fatty acid composition and sensory test of meat, but there is evidence that the highest level impaired immune response of animals to parasitic infection.
 
 
 
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