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Articles by Z. Xu
Total Records ( 4 ) for Z. Xu
  L Shi , C Mao , F Zeng , J Hou , H Zhang and Z. Xu
 

Angiotensin (Ang) II plays a critical role in cardiovascular homeostasis and neuroendocrine regulation. Little is known about whether central angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is functional in the fetal brain. We investigated cardiovascular and neuroendocrinological responses to intracerebroventricular (icv) application of Ang I in the chronically prepared near-term ovine fetus in utero and examined the action sites marked by c-fos expression in the fetal hypothalamus. ACE mRNA was detected in the specific central areas. Intracerebroventricular Ang I significantly increased fetal blood pressure and c-fos expression in the supraoptic nuclei (SON) and the paraventricular nuclei (PVN) in the hypothalamus, accompanied by an increase of fetal plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP). Double labeling demonstrated that AVP neurons in the fetal SON and PVN were expressing c-fos. Captopril, an inhibitor of ACE, significantly suppressed fetal pressor responses and plasma AVP. Double labeling experiments showed colocalization of AT1 receptor (AT1R) and c-fos expression in both SON and PVN following icv Ang I. The results indicate that central endogenous ACE has been functional at least at the last third of gestation and the endogenous brain renin-angiotensin system-mediated pressor responses and AVP release via AT1Rs by acting at the sites consistent with the cardiovascular network in the hypothalamus.

  Z. Guo , Z. Xu , F. Wang and B. Huang
  Call drop out is one of the most annoying problems in mobile communications. Over the years, many strategies have been proposed to solve the problem of call drop out, but it is still prevalent. One of the important reasons for call drop outs is high Bit Error Rate (BER). In this study, our intent is to reduce the call drop out by decreasing the BER based on Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD). Thereafter, we introduce a new signal processing subsystem at the receiver section to decrease BER and thereby improve the end-to-end performance of the system. Our simulation is valid specifically for Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) with QPSK modulation, although it can be extended to any cellular network. Our simulation proves that the new signal processing subsystem improves the BER performance.
  J Wang , L Zou , S Huang , F Lu , X Lang , L Han , Z Song and Z. Xu
 

To clarify the role of glutathione S-transferases (GSTs; GSTM1 and GSTT1) status in susceptibility to coronary heart disease (CHD), a meta-analysis of published studies was performed. A total of 19 studies including 8020 cases and 11 501 controls were included in this meta-analysis. In a combined analysis, the relative risks for CHD of the GSTM1 null and GSTT1 null polymorphisms were 1.47 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.08–2.01] and 1.26 (95% CI: 0.90–1.75), respectively. Three potential sources of heterogeneity including ethnicity, source of control and sample size of study were also assessed. However, no significant association was found in stratified analyses. By pooling data from eight studies (2909 cases and 3745 controls) that considered combinations of GSTT1 and GSTM1 genotypes, a statistically significant increased risk for CHD [odds ratio (OR = 2.38, 95% CI: 1.03–5.48)] was detected for individuals with combined deletion mutations in both genes compared with positive genotypes. Results from the meta-analysis of five studies on GSTs stratified according to smoking status showed an increased risk for individuals with null genotype (OR = 2.21, 95% CI: 1.24–3.92 for GSTM1 and OR = 3.29, 95% CI: 1.49–7.26 for GSTT1) versus non-null genotypes. This meta-analysis suggests that the GSTM1 null genotype may slightly increase the risk of CHD and that interaction between unfavourable GSTs genotypes may exist.

  M Motizuki and Z. Xu
 

The actin cytoskeleton of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae can be altered rapidly in response to external cues. We reported previously that S. cerevisiae responds to low-pH stress by transiently depolarizing its actin cytoskeleton, and that this step requires a mitogen-activated protein kinase, high osmolarity glycerol 1 (Hog1p). This study further investigated the components involved in this actin reorganization at pH 3.0. Gene deletions on the Sln1p branch of the HOG pathway completely blocked actin depolarization, suggesting that Hog1p activation depends mainly on the osmosensor Sln1p. The protein-synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide did not influence the time course of actin depolarization, suggesting that the depolarization is a direct effect of the HOG pathway. Deletion of the scaffolding protein, Spa2p, or the Spa2p-interacting protein Pea2p, markedly inhibited the depolarization, and further deletion of the formin protein, Bni1p, notably delayed actin repolarization. Our results suggest the involvement of polarisome proteins, such as Spa2p, Pea2p and Bni1p, but not Bud6p, in Hog1p-dependent reorganization of the yeast actin cytoskeleton at low pH.

 
 
 
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