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Articles by Z Zhao
Total Records ( 4 ) for Z Zhao
  R. B Schnabel , K. L Lunetta , M. G Larson , J Dupuis , I Lipinska , J Rong , M. H Chen , Z Zhao , J. F Yamamoto , J. B Meigs , V Nicaud , C Perret , T Zeller , S Blankenberg , L Tiret , J. F Keaney , R. S Vasan and E. J. Benjamin
 

Background— Environmental and genetic correlates of inflammatory marker variability are incompletely understood. In the family-based Framingham Heart Study, we investigated heritability and candidate gene associations of systemic inflammatory biomarkers.

Methods and Results— In offspring participants (n=3710), we examined 11 inflammatory biomarkers (CD40 ligand, C-reactive protein, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, interleukin-6, urinary isoprostanes, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, myeloperoxidase, P-selectin, tumor necrosis factor-, tumor necrosis factor receptor II, fibrinogen). Heritability and bivariate genetic and environmental correlations were assessed by Sequential Oligogenic Linkage Analysis routines in 1012 family members. We examined 1943 tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms in 233 inflammatory pathway genes with ≥5 minor allele carriers using a general genetic linear model. Clinical correlates explained 2.4% (CD40 ligand) to 28.5% (C-reactive protein) of the variability in inflammatory biomarkers. Estimated heritability ranged from 10.9% (isoprostanes) to 44.8% (P-selectin). Most correlations between biomarkers were weak although statistically significant. A total of 45 single-nucleotide polymorphism-biomarker associations met the q-value threshold of 0.25. Novel top single-nucleotide polymorphisms were observed in ICAM1 gene in relation to intercellular adhesion molecule-1 concentrations (rs1799969, P=1.32x10–8) and MPO in relation to myeloperoxidase (rs28730837, P=1.9x10–5). Lowest P values for trans-acting single-nucleotide polymorphisms were observed for APCS with monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 concentrations (rs1374486, P=1.01x10–7) and confirmed for IL6R with interleukin-6 concentrations (rs8192284, P=3.36x10–5). Novel potential candidates (APCS, MPO) need to be replicated.

Conclusions— Our community-based data support the relevance of clinical and genetic factors for explaining variation in inflammatory biomarker traits.

  Z Zhao , C Zhao , X. H Zhang , F Zheng , W Cai , H Vlassara and Z. A. Ma
 

Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are implicated in diabetic complications. However, their role in β-cell dysfunction is less clear. In this study we examined the effects of AGEs on islet function in mice and in isolated islets. AGE-BSA or BSA was administered ip to normal mice twice a day for 2 wk. We showed that AGE-BSA-treated mice exhibited significantly higher glucose levels and lower insulin levels in response to glucose challenge than did BSA-treated mice, although there were no significant differences in insulin sensitivity and islet morphology between two groups. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion by islets of the AGE-BSA-treated mice or AGE-BSA-treated normal islets was significantly lower than that by islets isolated from the BSA-treated mice or BSA-treated normal islets. Furthermore, AGE treatment of islet β-cells inhibited ATP production, and glimepiride, a sulfonylurea derivative, restored glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Further investigation indicated that AGEs inhibited cytochrome c oxidase activity by inducing the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Blocking the formation of nitric oxide with an iNOS selective inhibitor aminoguanidine reversed the inhibitory effects of AGEs on ATP production and insulin secretion. We conclude that AGEs inhibit cytochrome c oxidase and ATP production, leading to the impairment of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion through iNOS-dependent nitric oxide production.

  K. S Sandhu , C Shi , M Sjolinder , Z Zhao , A Gondor , L Liu , V. K Tiwari , S Guibert , L Emilsson , M. P Imreh and R. Ohlsson
 

Recent observations highlight that the mammalian genome extensively communicates with itself via long-range chromatin interactions. The causal link between such chromatin cross-talk and epigenetic states is, however, poorly understood. We identify here a network of physically juxtaposed regions from the entire genome with the common denominator of being genomically imprinted. Moreover, CTCF-binding sites within the H19 imprinting control region (ICR) not only determine the physical proximity among imprinted domains, but also transvect allele-specific epigenetic states, identified by replication timing patterns, to interacting, nonallelic imprinted regions during germline development. We conclude that one locus can directly or indirectly pleiotropically influence epigenetic states of multiple regions on other chromosomes with which it interacts.

  Z Zhao , B Ciric , S Yu , G. X Zhang and A. Rostami
 

Loss of expression of the 3G11 epitope, present on disialoceramide that is predominantly found on CD4+ T cells, has been associated with a regulatory T cell (Treg) phenotype and tolerance induction in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Here we report that treatment with anti-3G11 mAb shifts the immune response from pro-inflammatory to tolerogenic and suppresses both chronic-progressive and relapsing–remitting EAE. This therapeutic effect can be achieved at different stages of EAE. Treatment with anti-3G11 mAb increased the proportion of Foxp3+CD25+CD4+ Tregs and IL-10 production while inhibiting production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and responsiveness to IL-2 and decreasing the proportion of Th17 cells. The effect of anti-3G11 mAb was diminished in IL-10–/– mice, indicating that this cytokine mediates some of its effects. As 3G11 belongs to the ganglioside family, which is expressed on the surface of both murine and human CD4+ T cells, targeting this class of molecules may provide a novel approach for treating autoimmune diseases.

 
 
 
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