Asian Science Citation Index is committed to provide an authoritative, trusted and significant information by the coverage of the most important and influential journals to meet the needs of the global scientific community.  
ASCI Database
308-Lasani Town,
Sargodha Road,
Faisalabad, Pakistan
Fax: +92-41-8815544
Contact Via Web
Suggest a Journal
 
Articles by Z Yu
Total Records ( 4 ) for Z Yu
  Z Liu , Z Yu , N Liu , C Zhao , J Hu and Q. Dai
 

In our efforts for cloning novel I2-superfamily conotoxins using the signal peptide sequence, we identified a novel conotoxin Lt12.4 from Conus litteratus. This gene has a framework XII (-C-C-C-C-CC-C-C-), which is distinct from the cysteine pattern I2-superfamily conotoxin (-C-C-CC-CC-C-C-). Subsequently, we found the signal peptide sequence of Lt12.4 by 5'-RACE. Using this new sequence, we identified another five novel conotoxins with this cysteine pattern from four Conus species (Conus eburneus, Conus imperialis, Conus marmoreus, and C. litteratus). These novel conotoxins have the same cysteine pattern as the reported Gla-TxX and Gla-MII, and may contain Gla residues. Furthermore, they have the highly conserved signal peptide and hypervariable mature peptide sequences, and widely exist in Conus species. Therefore, it could be defined as a new superfamily of E-conotoxins.

  X Pan , N Gong , J Zhao , Z Yu , F Gu , J Chen , X Sun , L Zhao , M Yu , Z Xu , W Dong , Y Qin , G Fei , C Zhong and T. L. Xu
 

Reduction of glucose metabolism in brain is one of the main features of Alzheimer’s disease. Thiamine (vitamin B1)-dependent processes are critical in glucose metabolism and have been found to be impaired in brains from patients with Alzheimer’s disease. However, thiamine treatment exerts little beneficial effect in these patients. Here, we tested the effect of benfotiamine, a thiamine derivative with better bioavailability than thiamine, on cognitive impairment and pathology alterations in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease, the amyloid precursor protein/presenilin-1 transgenic mouse. We show that after a chronic 8 week treatment, benfotiamine dose-dependently enhanced the spatial memory of amyloid precursor protein/presenilin-1 mice in the Morris water maze test. Furthermore, benfotiamine effectively reduced both amyloid plaque numbers and phosphorylated tau levels in cortical areas of the transgenic mice brains. Unexpectedly, these effects were not mimicked by another lipophilic thiamine derivative, fursultiamine, although both benfotiamine and fursultiamine were effective in increasing the levels of free thiamine in the brain. Most notably, benfotiamine, but not fursultiamine, significantly elevated the phosphorylation level of glycogen synthase kinase-3 and -3β, and reduced their enzymatic activities in the amyloid precursor protein/presenilin-1 transgenic brain. Therefore, in the animal Alzheimer’s disease model, benfotiamine appears to improve the cognitive function and reduce amyloid deposition via thiamine-independent mechanisms, which are likely to include the suppression of glycogen synthase kinase-3 activities. These results suggest that, unlike many other thiamine-related drugs, benfotiamine may be beneficial for clinical Alzheimer’s disease treatment.

  Z Yu , A. M Wang , D. M Robins and A. P. Lieberman
  Zhigang Yu, Adrienne M. Wang, Diane M. Robins, and Andrew P. Lieberman

Here, we used a mouse model of Kennedy disease, a degenerative disorder caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the androgen receptor (AR) gene, to explore pathways leading to cellular dysfunction. We demonstrate that male mice containing a targeted Ar allele with 113 CAG repeats (AR113Q mice) exhibit hormone- and glutamine length-dependent missplicing of Clcn1 RNA in skeletal muscle. Changes in RNA splicing are associated with increased expression of the RNA-binding protein CUGBP1. Furthermore, we show that skeletal muscle denervation in the absence of a repeat expansion leads to increased CUGBP1 expression. However, this induction of CUGBP1 is not sufficient to alter Clcn1 RNA splicing, indicating that changes mediated by both denervation and AR113Q toxicity contribute to altered RNA processing. To test this notion directly, we exogenously expressed the AR in vitro and observed hormone-dependent changes in the splicing of pre-mRNAs from a human cardiac troponin T minigene. These effects were notably similar to changes mediated by RNA with expanded CUG tracts, but not CAG tracts, highlighting unanticipated similarities between CAG and CUG repeat diseases. The expanded glutamine AR also altered hormone-dependent splicing of a calcitonin/calcitonin gene-related peptide minigene, suggesting that toxicity of the mutant protein additionally affects RNA processing pathways that are distinct from those regulated by CUGBP1. Our studies demonstrate the occurrence of hormone-dependent alterations in RNA splicing in Kennedy disease models, and they indicate that these changes are mediated by both the cell-autonomous effects of the expanded glutamine AR protein and by alterations in skeletal muscle that are secondary to denervation.

  Z Zhang , X Xu , Y Zhang , J Zhou , Z Yu and C. He
 

LINGO-1 is a component of the tripartite receptor complexes, which act as a convergent mediator of the intracellular signaling in response to myelin-associated inhibitors and lead to collapse of growth cone and inhibition of neurite extension. Although the function of LINGO-1 has been intensively studied, its downstream signaling remains elusive. In the present study, a novel interaction between LINGO-1 and a serine-threonine kinase WNK1 was identified by yeast two-hybrid screen. The interaction was further validated by fluorescence resonance energy transfer and co-immunoprecipitation, and this interaction was intensified by Nogo66 treatment. Morphological evidences showed that WNK1 and LINGO-1 were co-localized in cortical neurons. Furthermore, either suppressing WNK1 expression by RNA interference or overexpression of WNK1-(123–510) attenuated Nogo66-induced inhibition of neurite extension and inhibited the activation of RhoA. Moreover, WNK1 was identified to interact with Rho-GDI1, and this interaction was attenuated by Nogo66 treatment, further indicating its regulatory effect on RhoA activation. Taken together, our results suggest that WNK1 is a novel signaling molecule involved in regulation of LINGO-1 mediated inhibition of neurite extension.

 
 
 
Copyright   |   Desclaimer   |    Privacy Policy   |   Browsers   |   Accessibility