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Articles by Z Dong
Total Records ( 6 ) for Z Dong
  Z Dong , W Dreher , D Leibfritz and B.S. Peterson
 

SUMMARY: A recent report of detection of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) in living human brain by using in vivo proton MR spectroscopy (1H-MR spectroscopy) has sparked great excitement in the field of biomedicine because of its potential influence and utility in clinical neuroscience research. On the other hand, the method used and the findings described in the report also caused heated debate and controversy. In this article, we will briefly detail the reasons for the debate and controversy from the point of view of the in vivo 1H-MR spectroscopy methodology and will propose some technical strategies in both data acquisition and data processing to improve the feasibility of detecting NPCs in future studies by using in vivo 1H-MR spectroscopy.

  S. P Stratton , D. S Alberts , J. G Einspahr , P. M Sagerman , J. A Warneke , C Curiel Lewandrowski , P. B Myrdal , K. L Karlage , B. J Nickoloff , C Brooks , K Saboda , M. L Yozwiak , M. F Krutzsch , C Hu , M Lluria Prevatt , Z Dong , G. T Bowden and P. H. Bartels
 

The chemopreventive and antitumor properties of perillyl alcohol (POH) that were studied preclinically indicate that topical POH inhibits both UVB-induced murine skin carcinogenesis (squamous cell tumor models) and 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene–induced murine melanoma (transgenic models involving tyrosinase-driven Ras). A previous phase 1 clinical trial in participants with normal-appearing skin showed that topical POH cream was well tolerated at a dose of 0.76% (w/w). Here, we performed a 3-month, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled phase 2a trial of two different doses of topical POH in individuals with sun-damaged skin. Participants applied POH cream twice daily to each dorsal forearm. Baseline and end-of-study biopsies were taken from each participant to evaluate whether the topical application of POH was effective in reversing actinic damage as evidenced by normalization of quantitative skin histopathologic scores and change in nuclear chromatin pattern as measured by karyometric analysis. There was a borderline reduction in the histopathologic score of the lower-dose POH group compared with the placebo (P = 0.1), but this was not observed in the high-dose group. However, in the high-dose group, a statistically significant reduction in the proportion of nuclei deviating from normal was observed by the use of karyometric analysis (P < 0.01). There was no statistical significance shown in the lower-dose group. No changes were observed in p53 expression, cellular proliferation (by proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression), or apoptosis in either treatment group compared with the placebo group. These results suggest that whereas our karyometric analyses can detect a modest effect of POH in sun-damaged skin, improved delivery into the epidermis may be necessary. Cancer Prev Res; 3(2); 160–9

  E. R Olson , T Melton , S. E Dickinson , Z Dong , D. S Alberts and G. T. Bowden
 

Quercetin (Qu) is currently being investigated as a chemopreventive agent for several cancers, including nonmelanoma skin cancer induced by UV light. We previously reported that Qu degradation has important consequences on signaling and cell biology. In the current study, we report that Qu induces c-Fos mRNA and protein expression through activation of p38 and cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB), and Qu potentiates UVB-induced c-Fos expression. Inclusion of ascorbic acid (AA) in cell culture medium stabilizes Qu and completely prevents both Qu- and UVB-induced p38 and CREB activation, leading to a blockade of c-fos gene expression through reduced CREB/cAMP-responsive element binding. AA stabilizes c-Fos mRNA, increasing steady-state levels even when c-fos gene expression is suppressed, but this has no effect on c-Fos protein levels in either mock- or UVB-irradiated cells. We report that Qu blocks mammalian target of rapamycin signaling and inhibits c-Fos protein expression directly through this mechanism because cotreatment with Qu and AA resulted in the complete suppression of UVB-induced c-Fos protein expression even in the presence of significantly increased mRNA levels. We further confirmed that this was not due to increased protein turnover because inhibition of proteasome activity with MG-132 did not raise c-Fos protein levels in Qu+AA-treated cells. Together, these data indicate that although Qu has been reported to have some beneficial properties as a chemopreventive agent, it is also capable of inducing c-fos expression, a cellular event important for the promotion phase of tumor development, if it is not stabilized. Cancer Prev Res; 3(7); 876–84. ©2010 AACR.

  J. Y Kwon , K. W Lee , J. E Kim , S. K Jung , N. J Kang , M. K Hwang , Y. S Heo , A. M Bode , Z Dong and H. J. Lee
 

Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a key mediator of inflammation, and its product, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), enhance carcinogenesis, particularly in skin. Ultraviolet (UV) B is the most carcinogenic component of solar irradiation, and a crucial role of COX-2 in UVB-mediated skin carcinogenesis has been reported. Here, we investigated the effects of delphinidin, an abundant dietary anthocyanin, on UVB-induced COX-2 upregulation and the underlying molecular mechanism. We found that delphinidin suppressed UVB-induced COX-2 expression in JB6 P+ mouse epidermal cells. COX-2 promoter activity and PGE2 production were also suppressed by delphinidin treatment within non-cytotoxic concentrations. Activator protein-1 and nuclear factor-B, crucial transcription factors involved in COX-2 expression, were activated by UVB and delphinidin abolished this activation. UVB-induced phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase, p38 kinase and Akt was inhibited by delphinidin. The activities of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MAPKK) 4 and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI-3K) were inhibited markedly by delphinidin. A pull-down assay using delphinidin–Sepharose beads revealed that delphinidin binds directly with MAPKK4 or PI-3K in a manner that was competitive with adenosine triphosphate. Moreover, in vivo investigations using mouse skin revealed that the upregulation of COX-2 expression, MAPKK4 activity and PI-3K activity induced by UVB was abolished with delphinidin treatment. Collectively, our results demonstrated that delphinidin targets MAPKK4 and PI-3K directly to suppress COX-2 overexpression, suggesting a potential protective role for delphinidin against UVB-mediated skin carcinogenesis.

  S. K Jung , K. W Lee , S Byun , E. J Lee , J. E Kim , A. M Bode , Z Dong and H. J. Lee
 

Myricetin is one of the principal phytochemicals in onions, berries and red wine. Previous studies showed that myricetin exhibits potent anticancer and chemopreventive effects. The present study examined the effect of myricetin on ultraviolet (UV) B-induced angiogenesis in an SKH-1 hairless mouse skin tumorigenesis model. Topical treatment with myricetin inhibited repetitive UVB-induced neovascularization in SKH-1 hairless mouse skin. The induction of vascular endothelial growth factor, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and MMP-13 expression by chronic UVB irradiation was significantly suppressed by myricetin treatment. Immunohistochemical and western blot analyses revealed that myricetin inhibited UVB-induced hypoxia inducible factor-1 expression in mouse skin. Western blot analysis and kinase assay data revealed that myricetin suppressed UVB-induced phosphatidylinositol-3 (PI-3) kinase activity and subsequently attenuated the UVB-induced phosphorylation of Akt/p70S6K in mouse skin lysates. A pull-down assay revealed the direct binding of PI-3 kinase and myricetin in mouse skin lysates. Our results indicate that myricetin suppresses UVB-induced angiogenesis by regulating PI-3 kinase activity in vivo in mouse skin.

  Z Dong , Y Liu , K. F Scott , L Levin , K Gaitonde , R. B Bracken , B Burke , Q. J Zhai , J Wang , L Oleksowicz and S. Lu
 

The majority of prostate cancers are indolent, whereas a significant portion of patients will require systemic treatment during the course of their disease. To date, only high Gleason scores are best associated with a poor prognosis in prostate cancer. No validated serum biomarker has been identified with prognostic power. Previous studies showed that secretory phospholipase A2-IIa (sPLA2-IIa) is overexpressed in almost all human prostate cancer specimens and its elevated levels are correlated with high tumor grade. Here, we found that sPLA2-IIa is overexpressed in androgen-independent prostate cancer LNCaP-AI cells relative to their androgen-dependent LNCaP cell counterparts. LNCaP-AI cells also secrete significantly higher levels of sPLA2-IIa. Blocking sPLA2-IIa function compromises androgen-independent cell growth. Inhibition of the ligand-induced signaling output of the HER network, by blocking PI3K-Akt signaling and the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-B)-mediated pathway, compromises both sPLA2-IIa protein expression and secretion, as a result of downregulation of sPLA2-IIa promoter activity. More importantly, we demonstrated elevated serum sPLA2-IIa levels in prostate cancer patients. High serum sPLA2-IIa levels are associated significantly with high Gleason score and advanced disease stage. Increased sPLA2-IIa expression was confirmed in prostate cancer cells, but not in normal epithelium and stroma by immunohistochemistry analysis. We showed that elevated signaling of the HER/HER2-PI3K-Akt-NF-B pathway contributes to sPLA2-IIa overexpression and secretion by prostate cancer cells. Given that sPLA2-IIa overexpression is associated with prostate development and progression, serum sPLA2-IIa may serve as a prognostic biomarker for prostate cancer and a potential surrogate prostate biomarker indicative of tumor burden.

 
 
 
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