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Articles by Y. Hirakawa
Total Records ( 5 ) for Y. Hirakawa
  Y. Okada , K. Kawasumi , M. Koide , Y. Hirakawa , N. Mori , I. Yamamoto and T. Arai
  Background: Aging is generally associated with alterations in physical activity, weight status and energy metabolism, which predisposes aged individuals to metabolic syndrome. In this manuscript, age effects on energy metabolic indicators of similar physical activity and weight status but of varying ages were investigated. Materials and Methods: Energy metabolic indicators, such as plasma adiponectin, leukocytic AMP-activated protein kinase, plasma malate dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase along with common plasma metabolites, were measured in healthy young (AV = 7.1 years) and aged (AV = 14.1 years) riding horses of similar physical activity, diet and weight status. Malate dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase ratio was also calculated as the indicator of energy metabolism. Results: Plasma adiponectin concentration and leukocytic AMP-activated protein kinase activity in aged horses were significantly lower than those in young horses (p<0.05, Mann-Whitney U test). Although not significant, energy metabolism indicators, malate dehydrogenase, lactate dehydrogenase and their ratio were lower in aged group when compared to those of young group. Conclusion: The present results indicate the decline in energy metabolism with aging in healthy horses even without any visible changes in adiposity. Such changes reflect dysfunction of energy metabolism and predispose the aged individuals to the development of metabolic syndrome.
  N. Mukai , Y. Doi , T. Ninomiya , J. Hata , Y. Hirakawa , M. Fukuhara , M. Iwase and Y. Kiyohara
  Aims We examined the optimal cut-off values of fasting plasma glucose, 2−h post-load glucose and HbA1c for predicting Type 2 diabetes in community-dwelling Japanese subjects. Methods A total of 1982 subjects without diabetes aged 40−79 years who underwent a 75−g oral glucose tolerance test were followed prospectively for 14 years by annual health examination. Results During the follow-up, 295 subjects developed Type 2 diabetes. Compared with the first decile, the crude hazard ratio for incident Type 2 diabetes was significantly higher in the fifth fasting plasma glucose decile [5.4−5.4 mmol/l (97−98 mg/dl)] or higher, in the seventh 2−h post-load glucose decile [6.9−7.2 mmol/l (124−131 mg/dl)] or higher, and in the fifth HbA1c decile [34−36 mmol/mol (5.3−5.4%)] or higher. These associations remained substantially unchanged even after adjustment for confounding factors. The receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that the optimal cut-off values for predicting Type 2 diabetes were 5.6 mmol/l (101 mg/dl) for fasting plasma glucose, 6.9 mmol/l (124 mg/dl) for 2−h post-load glucose and 37 mmol/mol (5.5%) for HbA1c. In a stratified analysis, the cut-off values were approximately 5.6 mmol/l (101 mg/dl) for fasting plasma glucose and 37 mmol/mol (5.5%) for HbA1c, and these values were unchanged over BMI quartile levels, whereas the 2−h post-load glucose cut-off values declined with decreasing BMI levels. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the cut-off value for predicting Type 2 diabetes in the Japanese population is 5.6 mmol/l (101 mg/dl) for fasting plasma glucose and 37 mmol/mol (5.5%) for HbA1c, while the 2−h post-load glucose cut-off value is lower than the diagnostic criterion for impaired glucose tolerance.
  Y. Doi , T. Ninomiya , J. Hata , Y. Hirakawa , N. Mukai , M. Iwase and Y. Kiyohara
  Aims  Risk scoring methods are effective for identifying persons at high risk of Type 2 diabetes mellitus, but such approaches have not yet been established in Japan. Methods  A total of 1935 subjects of a derivation cohort were followed up for 14 years from 1988 and 1147 subjects of a validation cohort independent of the derivation cohort were followed up for 5 years from 2002. Risk scores were estimated based on the coefficients (β) of Cox proportional hazards model in the derivation cohort and were verified in the validation cohort. Results  In the derivation cohort, the non-invasive risk model was established using significant risk factors; namely, age, sex, family history of diabetes, abdominal circumference, body mass index, hypertension, regular exercise and current smoking. We also created another scoring risk model by adding fasting plasma glucose levels to the non-invasive model (plus-fasting plasma glucose model). The area under the curve of the non-invasive model was 0.700 and it increased significantly to 0.772 (P < 0.001) in the plus-fasting plasma glucose model. The ability of the non-invasive model to predict Type 2 diabetes was comparable with that of impaired glucose tolerance, and the plus-fasting plasma glucose model was superior to it. The cumulative incidence of Type 2 diabetes was significantly increased with elevating quintiles of the sum scores of both models in the validation cohort (P for trend < 0.001). Conclusions  We developed two practical risk score models for easily identifying individuals at high risk of incident Type 2 diabetes without an oral glucose tolerance test in the Japanese population.
  A. Hata , Y. Doi , T. Ninomiya , N. Mukai , Y. Hirakawa , J. Hata , M. Ozawa , K. Uchida , T. Shirota , T. Kitazono and Y. Kiyohara
 

Aims

Early studies have shown that magnesium intake decreases the risk of Type 2 diabetes, but the results are still inconsistent. We prospectively examined the association between magnesium intake and incidence of Type 2 diabetes in a general Japanese population.

Methods

A total of 1999 subjects without diabetes aged 40-79 years who underwent a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test were followed up prospectively for a mean of 15.6 years.

Results

During the follow-up, 417 subjects developed Type 2 diabetes. The age- and sex-adjusted incidence of Type 2 diabetes significantly decreased with increasing magnesium intake quartile levels (≤ 148.5, 148.6-171.5, 171.6-195.5 and ≥ 195.6 mg/day, P for trend = 0.01). In multivariate analyses, after adjusting for comprehensive risk factors and other dietary factors, the hazard ratio of Type 2 diabetes was 0.67 (95% CI 0.49-0.92; = 0.01) in the third quartile and 0.63 (95% CI 0.44-0.90; = 0.01) in the highest quartile compared with the first quartile. In addition, the risk of Type 2 diabetes was 14% lower (= 0.04) for a 1-sd increment of log-transformed magnesium intake in the multivariate-adjusted model. In stratified analysis, there were statistically significant interactions between magnesium intake and levels of homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein or alcohol intake on the risk of Type 2 diabetes (all < 0.05).

Conclusions

Our findings suggest that increased magnesium intake was a significant protective factor for the incidence of Type 2 diabetes in the general Japanese population, especially among subjects with insulin resistance, low-grade inflammation and a drinking habit.

  K. Kawasumi , Y. Hirakawa , P. Lee , N. Mori , I. Yamamoto , T. Arai and F. Terasawa
  In this study, plasma glucose and lipid concentrations and cholesterol lipoprotein profile were measured and compared in 5 captive bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus), 6 Thoroughbred riding horses and 12 lactating Holstein cows. Plasma glucose concentrations of cows (71.36±5.05 mg dL-1) were significantly lower than those of dolphins (107.00±16.20 mg dL-1) and horses. Plasma TG concentrations of dolphins (22.80±8.70 mg dL-1) were demonstrated significant difference compared to horses and cows (14.33±5.28 and 8.14±1.46 mg dL-1), respectively. Total cholesterol concentrations of horses (73.50±2.88 mg dL-1) were significantly lower than those of dolphins (195.20±61.20 mg dL-1). Furthermore, NEFA values of dolphins (0.32±0.12 mEq L-1) were demonstrated significant difference compared to horses and cows (0.04±0.02 and 0.09±0.03 mEq L-1, respectively). All animals showed HDL-cholesterol dominant patterns in plasma and dolphins and horses showed clear LDL-cholesterol peak which was lower than HDL-cholesterol.
 
 
 
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