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Articles by Y. T Jeon
Total Records ( 2 ) for Y. T Jeon
  J. Y Hwang , H. S Na , Y. T Jeon , Y. J Ro , C. S Kim and S. H. Do
  Background

In a randomized, double-blind, prospective study, we have evaluated the effect of i.v. infusion of magnesium sulphate during spinal anaesthesia on postoperative analgesia and postoperative analgesic requirements.

Methods

Forty patients undergoing total hip replacement arthroplasty under spinal anaesthesia were included. After the induction of spinal anaesthesia, the magnesium group (Group M) received magnesium sulphate 50 mg kg–1 for 15 min and then 15 mg kg–1 h–1 by continuous i.v. infusion until the end of surgery. The saline group (Group S) received the same volume of isotonic saline over the same period. After surgery, a patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) device containing morphine and ketorolac was provided for the patients. Postoperative pain scores, PCA consumption, and the incidences of shivering, postoperative nausea, and vomiting were evaluated immediately after surgery, and at 30 min, 4, 24, and 48 h after surgery. Serum magnesium concentrations were checked before the induction of anaesthesia, immediately after surgery, and at 1 and 24 h after surgery.

Results

Postoperative pain scores were significantly lower in Group M at 4, 24, and 48 h after surgery (P<0.05). Cumulative postoperative PCA consumptions were also significantly lower in Group M at 4, 24, and 48 h after surgery (P<0.05). Postoperative magnesium concentrations were higher in Group M (P<0.05 at 4, 24, and 48 h after surgery), but no side-effects associated with hypermagnesemia were observed. Haemodynamic variables and the incidences of shivering, nausea, and vomiting were similar in the two groups.

Conclusions

I.V. magnesium sulphate administration during spinal anaesthesia improves postoperative analgesia.

  H. S Na , J. H Lee , J. Y Hwang , J. H Ryu , S. H Han , Y. T Jeon and S. H. Do
  Background

In this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study, we evaluated the effects of magnesium sulphate on neuromuscular blocking agent requirements and analgesia in children with cerebral palsy (CP).

Methods

We randomly divided 61 children with CP undergoing orthopaedic surgery into two groups. The magnesium group (Group M) received magnesium sulphate 50 mg kg–1 i.v. as a bolus and 15 mg kg–1 h–1 by continuous infusion during the operation. The control group (Group S) received the same amount of isotonic saline. Rocuronium was administered 0.6 mg kg–1 before intubation and 0.1 mg kg–1 additionally when train-of-four counts were 2 or more. I.V. fentanyl and ketorolac were used to control postoperative pain. Total infused analgesic volumes and pain scores were evaluated at postoperative 30 min, and at 6, 24, and 48 h.

Results

The rocuronium requirement of Group M was significantly less than that of Group S [0.29 (0.12) vs 0.42 (0.16) mg kg–1 h–1, P<0.05]. Cumulative analgesic consumption in Group M was significantly less after operation at 24 and 48 h (P<0.05), and pain scores in Group M were lower than in Group S during the entire postoperative period (P<0.05). Serum magnesium concentrations in Group M were higher until 24 h after operation (P<0.05). The incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting and rescue drug injections was similar in the two groups. No shivering or adverse effects related to hypermagnesaemia were encountered.

Conclusions

I.V. magnesium sulphate reduces rocuronium requirements and postoperative analgesic consumption in children with CP.

 
 
 
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