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Articles by Y. S Cho
Total Records ( 3 ) for Y. S Cho
  K. H Jung , Y. S Cho , S. H Hong , W. H Chung , G. J Lee and S. D. Hong
 

Objective  To measure subjective outcomes after primary and revision surgery for chronic ear disease.

Design  Prospective questionnaire-based outcome study.

Setting  Tertiary referral center.

Patients  Adults with chronic otitis media with or without cholesteatoma.

Interventions  Primary or revision surgery for chronic ear disease.

Main Outcome Measures  The Chronic Ear Survey, a disease-specific outcome survey, was administered preoperatively and at 1 year after surgery. We analyzed the total score and the activity restriction, symptom, and medical resource utilization subscale scores. Scores were averaged on the basis of the number of questions included in each category. Differences in preoperative and postoperative scores were analyzed within and between the 2 groups. We also assessed audiometry, postoperative complications, and the clinical condition of the operated-on ear.

Results  Twenty-one patients were enrolled in the primary surgery group, and 20 were enrolled in the revision surgery group. Significant improvements in the total score and each subscale score were observed in both groups at the 1-year postoperative survey. Improvements in the total score and symptom subscale scores were greater in the primary surgery group than in the revision surgery group (P < .05). The air conduction thresholds and any postoperative clinical problems were correlated with the total score and subscale scores in the primary group but not in the revision surgery group.

Conclusion  Comparable objective outcomes are achieved after primary and revision surgery for chronic ear disease, but the improvement in quality of life is greater in the primary surgery group.

  B. K Koo , K Waseda , H. J Kang , H. S Kim , C. W Nam , S. H Hur , J. S Kim , D Choi , Y Jang , J. Y Hahn , H. C Gwon , M. H Yoon , S. J Tahk , W. Y Chung , Y. S Cho , D. J Choi , T Hasegawa , T Kataoka , S. J Oh , Y Honda , P. J Fitzgerald and W. F. Fearon
 

Background— We sought to investigate the mechanism of geometric changes after main branch (MB) stent implantation and to identify the predictors of functionally significant "jailed" side branch (SB) lesions.

Methods and Results— Seventy-seven patients with bifurcation lesions were prospectively enrolled from 8 centers. MB intravascular ultrasound was performed before and after MB stent implantation, and fractional flow reserve was measured in the jailed SB. The vessel volume index of both the proximal and distal MB was increased after stent implantation. The plaque volume index decreased in the proximal MB (9.1±3.0 to 8.4±2.4 mm3/mm, P=0.001), implicating plaque shift, but not in the distal MB (5.4±1.8 to 5.3±1.7 mm3/mm, P=0.227), implicating carina shifting to account for the change in vessel size (N=56). The mean SB fractional flow reserve was 0.71±0.20 (N=68) and 43% of the lesions were functionally significant. Binary logistic-regression analysis revealed that preintervention % diameter stenosis of the SB (odds ratio=1.05; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.09) and the MB minimum lumen diameter located distal to the SB ostium (odds ratio=3.86; 95% CI, 1.03 to 14.43) were independent predictors of functionally significant SB jailing. In patients with ≥75% stenosis and Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction grade 3 flow in the SB, no difference in poststent angiographic and intravascular ultrasound parameters was found between SB lesions with and without functional significance.

Conclusions— Both plaque shift from the MB and carina shift contribute to the creation/aggravation of an SB ostial lesion after MB stent implantation. Anatomic evaluation does not reliably predict the functional significance of a jailed SB stenosis.

Clinical Trial Registration: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique Identifier: NCT00553670.

  J. W Chung , H. M Yang , K. W Park , H. Y Lee , J. S Park , H. J Kang , Y. S Cho , T. J Youn , B. K Koo , I. H Chae , D. J Choi , B. H Oh , Y. B Park and H. S. Kim
  Background—

In the COREA-TAXUS trial ("Effect of Celecoxib On REstenosis after coronary Angioplasty with a TAXUS stent"), celecoxib reduced late luminal loss and adverse cardiac events at follow-up around 6 months. The objective of this study was to assess the long-term outcome of short-term adjunctive celecoxib treatment after paclitaxel-eluting stent implantation.

Methods and Results—

This is a 2-year clinical follow-up of the COREA-TAXUS trial, an open-label randomized controlled study. A total 274 patients were randomized to receive or not receive celecoxib (400 mg before the intervention and 200 mg twice daily for 6 months after the procedure), and 271 underwent successful paclitaxel-eluting stent implantation. All patients were given aspirin (100 mg daily indefinitely) and clopidogrel (75 mg daily for at least 6 months). Among the 271 patients, 267 (98.5%) completed the 2-year clinical follow-up. From the previous follow-up to 2 years, there was no difference in the rate of adverse cardiac events between the celecoxib and control groups (1.6% versus 4.3%, P=0.27). Thus, at 2 years, the rate of adverse cardiac events was consistently lower in the celecoxib group (6.9% versus 19.7%, P=0.002). A significant reduction in need for target lesion revascularization was observed (6.2% versus 18.2%, P=0.003). The efficacy benefit in the celecoxib group was not undermined by an increased risk for cardiac death or myocardial infarction at 2 years (1.5% versus 1.4%).

Conclusions—

Six-month adjunctive celecoxib treatment after paclitaxel-eluting stent implantation was associated with durable long-term efficacy up to 2 years. However, the inconclusive evidence for the long-term safety of this treatment warrants caution.

Clinical Trial Registration—

URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT 00292721.

 
 
 
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