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Articles by Y Yin
Total Records ( 3 ) for Y Yin
  N Wu , Y Zhao , Y Yin , Y Zhang and J. Luo
 

Our previous studies have demonstrated that bone morphogenetic protein 9 (BMP-9) is one of the most efficacious BMPs to induce osteoblast differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). However, the molecular mechanism underlying the BMP-9-induced osteogenic differentiation of MSCs remains to be fully elucidated. In this study, dominant negative (DN) type II TGF-β receptors were constructed and introduced into C3H10T1/2 stem cells, then in vitro and in vivo assays were carried out to analyze and identify the type II TGF-β receptors required for BMP-9-induced osteogenesis. We found that three DN type II TGF-β receptors, DN-BMPRII, DN-ActRII, and DN-ActRIIB, diminished BMP-9-induced alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, led to a decrease in BMP-9-induced Smad binding element (SBE)-controled reporter activity, reduced BMP-9-induced expressions of Smad6 and Smad7, and decreased BMP-9-induced mineralization in vitro and ectopic bone formation in vivo, finally resulted in decreased bone masses and immature osteogenesis. These findings strongly suggested that three wild-type II TGF-β receptors, BMPRII, ActRII and ActRIIB, may play a functional role in BMP-9-induced osteogenic differentiation of C3H10T1/2 cells. However, C3H10T1/2 stem cells can express BMPRII and ActRII, but not ActRIIB. Using RNA interference (RNAi), we found that luciferase reporter activity and ALP activity induced by BMP-9 were accordingly inhibited along with the knockdown of BMPRII and ActRII. Taken together, our results demonstrated that BMPRII and ActRII are the functional type II TGF-β receptors in BMP-9-induced osteogenic differentiation of C3H10T1/2 cells.

  E. M Schindler , A Hindes , E. L Gribben , C. J Burns , Y Yin , M. H Lin , R. J Owen , G. D Longmore , G. E Kissling , J. S. C Arthur and T. Efimova
 

Activating Ras mutations occur in a large portion of human tumors. Yet, the signaling pathways involved in Ras-induced tumor formation remain incompletely understood. The mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways are among the best studied Ras effector pathways. The p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase isoforms are important regulators of key biological processes including cell proliferation, differentiation, survival, inflammation, senescence, and tumorigenesis. However, the specific in vivo contribution of individual p38 isoforms to skin tumor development has not been elucidated. Recent studies have shown that p38, a p38 family member, functions as an important regulator of epidermal keratinocyte differentiation and survival. In the present study, we have assessed the effect of p38 deficiency on skin tumor development in vivo by subjecting p38 knockout mice to a two-stage 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene/12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate chemical skin carcinogenesis protocol. We report that mice lacking p38 gene exhibited a marked resistance to development of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene/12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-induced skin papillomas, with increased latency and greatly reduced incidence, multiplicity, and size of tumors compared with wild-type mice. Our data suggest that the underlying mechanism for reduced susceptibility to skin carcinogenesis in p38-null mice involves a defect in proliferative response associated with aberrant signaling through the two major transformation-promoting pathways: extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2-activator protein 1 and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3. These findings strongly suggest an in vivo role for p38 in promoting cell proliferation and tumor development in epidermis and may have therapeutic implication for skin cancer. [Cancer Res 2009;69(11):4648–55]

  Y Kong , G Zhou , U Avci , X Gu , C Jones , Y Yin , Y Xu and M. G. Hahn
 

Several genes in Arabidopsis, including PARVUS/AtGATL1, have been implicated in xylan synthesis. However, the biosynthesis of xylan in woody plants, where this polysaccharide is a major component of wood, is poorly understood. Here, we characterize two Populus genes, PdGATL1.1 and PdGATL1.2, the closest orthologs to the Arabidopsis PARVUS/GATL1 gene, with respect to their gene expression in poplar, their sub-cellular localization, and their ability to complement the parvus mutation in Arabidopsis. Overexpression of the two poplar genes in the parvus mutant rescued most of the defects caused by the parvus mutation, including morphological changes, collapsed xylem, and altered cell wall monosaccharide composition. Quantitative RT–PCR showed that PdGATL1.1 is expressed most strongly in developing xylem of poplar. In contrast, PdGATL1.2 is expressed much more uniformly in leaf, shoot tip, cortex, phloem, and xylem, and the transcript level of PdGATL1.2 is much lower than that of PdGATL1.1 in all tissues examined. Sub-cellular localization experiments showed that these two proteins are localized to both ER and Golgi in comparison with marker proteins resident to these sub-cellular compartments. Our data indicate that PdGATL1.1 and PdGATL1.2 are functional orthologs of PARVUS/GATL1 and can play a role in xylan synthesis, but may also have role(s) in the synthesis of other wall polymers.

 
 
 
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