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Articles by Y Lin
Total Records ( 4 ) for Y Lin
  X Zheng , X. X Cui , Z Gao , Y Zhao , Y Lin , W. J Shih , M. T Huang , Y Liu , A Rabson , B Reddy , C. S Yang and A. H. Conney
 

Epidemiology studies suggest that statins and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs reduce the risk of prostate cancer. In the present study, LNCaP cells were cultured in regular medium containing fetal bovine serum or in medium supplemented with charcoal-stripped fetal bovine serum to mimic androgen deprivation treatment. We found that atorvastatin (Lipitor) or celecoxib (Celebrex) treatment of LNCaP cells cultured in regular or androgen-depleted medium inhibited growth and stimulated apoptosis. A combination of atorvastatin and celecoxib was more effective than either agent alone. In animal studies, severe combined immunodeficient mice were injected s.c. with LNCaP cells in Matrigel. After 4 to 6 weeks, mice with LNCaP tumors (about 0.6 cm wide and 0.6 cm long) were surgically castrated and received daily i.p. injections of vehicle, atorvastatin (10 µg/g body weight/d), celecoxib (10 µg/g/d), or a combination of atorvastatin (5 µg/g/d) and celecoxib (5 µg/g/d) for 42 days. In all groups, the androgen-dependent LNCaP tumors regressed initially in response to castration, but the tumors eventually progressed to androgen independence and started to grow. Treatment of the mice with atorvastatin or celecoxib alone suppressed the regrowth of LNCaP tumors after castration. A combination of low doses of atorvastatin and celecoxib had a more potent effect in inhibiting the growth and progression of LNCaP tumors to androgen independence than a higher dose of either agent alone. Our results indicate that administration of a combination of atorvastatin and celecoxib may be an effective strategy for the prevention of prostate cancer progression from androgen dependence to androgen independence. Cancer Prev Res; 3(1); 114–24

  Y Cheng , X Liu , J Yang , Y Lin , D. Z Xu , Q Lu , E. A Deitch , Y Huo , E. S Delphin and C. Zhang
 

Phenotypic modulation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of a variety of proliferative vascular diseases. Recently, we have found that microRNA (miRNA) miR-145 is the most abundant miRNA in normal vascular walls and in freshly isolated VSMCs; however, the role of miR-145 in VSMC phenotypic modulation and vascular diseases is currently unknown. Here we find that miR-145 is selectively expressed in VSMCs of the vascular wall and its expression is significantly downregulated in the vascular walls with neointimal lesion formation and in cultured dedifferentiated VSMCs. More importantly, both in cultured rat VSMCs in vitro and in balloon-injured rat carotid arteries in vivo, we demonstrate that the noncoding RNA miR-145 is a novel phenotypic marker and a novel phenotypic modulator of VSMCs. VSMC differentiation marker genes such as SM -actin, calponin, and SM-MHC are upregulated by premiR-145 or adenovirus expressing miR-145 (Ad-miR-145) but are downregulated by the miR-145 inhibitor 2'OMe-miR-145. We have further identified that miR-145-mediated phenotypic modulation of VSMCs is through its target gene KLF5 and its downstream signaling molecule, myocardin. Finally, restoration of miR-145 in balloon-injured arteries via Ad-miR-145 inhibits neointimal growth. We conclude that miR-145 is a novel VSMC phenotypic marker and modulator that is able of controlling vascular neointimal lesion formation. These novel findings may have extensive implications for the diagnosis and therapy of a variety of proliferative vascular diseases.

  Y Lin , Q Fu , J Zhu , J. M Miller and J. E. Van Eyk
  BACKGROUND:

With myocardial infarction (MI), cardiac troponin is released from the heart into circulation, where it can be detected with immunoassays independently quantifying cardiac troponin I (cTnI) or cTnT. There is, however, no single immunoassay that sequentially probes the posttranslational modification status of cTnI or directly characterizes whether circulating cTnI is bound to cTnC and/or cTnT. Here we describe the development of a qualitative immunoassay to directly probe the primary and ternary structure of circulating cTnI through diffractive optics technology (dotLab® System, Axela).

METHODS:

Anti-cTnI antibody 8I-7 was immobilized on a patterned sensor to capture cTnI. One or more detector antibodies were sequentially introduced to probe for amino acid sequence integrity or phosphorylation status of cTnI, or its association with cTnC and/or cTnT. Respective immunocaptures were recorded as real-time diffractive intensities (DIs), and the DI differences were analyzed. Each immunodetection was independent of the others but was done in a single sequential assay.

RESULTS:

This diffraction-based immunoassay successfully characterized cTnI. The unamplified assay determined whether cTnI was degraded at N-terminus and/or C-terminus or phosphorylated. Sequential application of multiple detector antibodies without an antibody-stripping step enables real-time interrogation of 5 different epitopes of cTnI, or direct detection of the cTn complex (cTnI–cTnC–cTnT) in a single sequential assay. Finally, this assay was optimized with amplification to directly detect circulating cTnI bound to cTnC and cTnT in serum from an MI patient.

CONCLUSIONS:

The dot® Immunoassay is the first qualitative sequential immunoassay to address the direct interactions of the troponin subunits and various modified forms of cTnI.

 
 
 
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