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Articles by Y Liang
Total Records ( 3 ) for Y Liang
  J Yang , X Liu , J Yu , L Sheng , Y Shi , Z Li , Y Hu , J Xue , L Wu , Y Liang , J Xia and D. Liang
 

Gene therapy has emerged as a promising approach for the lethal disorder of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Using a novel non-viral delivery system, the human ribosomal DNA (hrDNA) targeting vector, we targeted a minidystrophin-GFP fusion gene into the hrDNA locus of HT1080 cells with a high site-specific integrated efficiency of 10–5, in which the transgene could express efficiently and continuously. The minidystrophin-GFP fusion protein was easily found to localize on the plasma membrane of HT1080 cells, indicating its possible physiologic performance. Our findings showed that the hrDNA-targeting vector might be highly useful for DMD gene therapy study.

  X Rao , P Deighan , Z Hua , X Hu , J Wang , M Luo , Y Liang , G Zhong , A Hochschild and L. Shen
 

The obligate intracellular human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis undergoes a complex developmental program involving transition between two forms: the infectious elementary body (EB), and the rapidly dividing reticulate body (RB). However, the regulators controlling this development have not been identified. To uncover potential regulators of transcription in C. trachomatis, we screened a C. trachomatis genomic library for sequences encoding proteins that interact with RNA polymerase (RNAP). We report the identification of one such protein, CT663, which interacts with the β and subunits of RNAP. Specifically, we show that CT663 interacts with the flap domain of the β subunit (β-flap) and conserved region 4 of the primary subunit (66 in C. trachomatis). We find that CT663 inhibits 66-dependent (but not 28-dependent) transcription in vitro, and we present evidence that CT663 exerts this effect as a component of the RNAP holoenzyme. The analysis of C. trachomatis-infected cells reveals that CT663 begins to accumulate at the commencement of the RB-to-EB transition. Our findings suggest that CT663 functions as a negative regulator of 66-dependent transcription, facilitating a global change in gene expression. The strategy used here is generally applicable in cases where genetic tools are unavailable.

  J Tang , S Le , L Sun , X Yan , M Zhang , J MacLeod , B LeRoy , N Northrup , A Ellis , T. J Yeatman , Y Liang , M. E Zwick and S. Zhao
 

Human colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the better-understood systems for studying the genetics of cancer initiation and progression. To develop a cross-species comparison strategy for identifying CRC causative gene or genomic alterations, we performed array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) to investigate copy number abnormalities (CNAs), one of the most prominent lesion types reported for human CRCs, in 10 spontaneously occurring canine CRCs. The results revealed for the first time a strong degree of genetic homology between sporadic canine and human CRCs. First, we saw that between 5% and 22% of the canine genome was amplified/deleted in these tumors, and that, reminiscent of human CRCs, the total altered sequences directly correlated to the tumor's progression stage, origin, and likely microsatellite instability status. Second, when mapping the identified CNAs onto syntenic regions of the human genome, we noted that the canine orthologs of genes participating in known human CRC pathways were recurrently disrupted, indicating that these pathways might be altered in the canine CRCs as well. Last, we observed a significant overlapping of CNAs between human and canine tumors, and tumors from the two species were clustered according to the tumor subtypes but not the species. Significantly, compared with the shared CNAs, we found that species-specific (especially human-specific) CNAs localize to evolutionarily unstable regions that harbor more segmental duplications and interspecies genomic rearrangement breakpoints. These findings indicate that CNAs recurrent between human and dog CRCs may have a higher probability of being cancer-causative, compared with CNAs found in one species only.

 
 
 
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