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Articles by Y Ding
Total Records ( 16 ) for Y Ding
  D Han , Y Ding , S. L Liu , G Wang , I. C Si , X Wang , L Cui and D. Huang
 

Fas ligand (FasL) may play an important role in maintaining the immune privilege of intervertebral disc (IVD). Besides, it is closely related to the apoptosis of degenerative disc cells. Nowadays, lots of reports have described about the paradoxical effects of FasL, although the effect of FasL on IVD cells is still under debate. In this study, we tried to investigate the effects of FasL on Fas expression and on the apoptosis of nucleus pulposus (NP) cells in Sprague–Dawley rats. The results showed that the expression of Fas in NP cells was significantly increased by the recombinant FasL. Meanwhile, the apoptosis of NP cells increased markedly in a FasL dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, RNA interference results indicated that the increase of Fas expression and the NP cell apoptosis described previously were inhibited by Fas siRNA, suggesting that RNA interference might be one of novel strategies to prevent IVD cells from apoptosis.

  Q Wang , J Li , J Gu , B Huang , Y Zhao , D Zheng , Y Ding and L. Zeng
 

The green tea constituent, (–)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), has chemopreventive and anticancer effects. This is partially because of the selective ability of EGCG to induce apoptosis and death in cancer cells without affecting normal cells. In the present study, the activity of EGCG against the myeloma cell line, KM3, was examined. Our results demonstrated, for the first time, that the treatment of the KM3 cell line with EGCG inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis, and there is a synergistic effect when EGCG and bortezomib are combined. Further experiments showed that this effect involves the NF-B pathway. EGCG inhibits the expression of the P65 mRNA and P65/pP65 protein, meanwhile it downregulates pIB expression and upregulates IB expression. EGCG also activates caspase-3, -8, cleaved caspase-9, and poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) and subsequent apoptosis. These findings provided experimental evidence for efficacy of EGCG alone or in combination with bortezomib in multiple myeloma therapy.

  X Fan , Y Ding , S Brown , L Zhou , M Shaw , M. C Vella , H Cheng , E. C McNay , R. S Sherwin and R. J. McCrimmon
  In nondiabetic rodents, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays a role in the glucose-sensing mechanism used by the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH), a key brain region involved in the detection of hypoglycemia. However, AMPK is regulated by both hyper- and hypoglycemia, so whether AMPK plays a similar role in type 1 diabetes (T1DM) is unknown. To address this issue, we used four groups of chronically catheterized male diabetic BB rats, a rodent model of autoimmune T1DM with established insulin—requiring diabetes (40 ± 4 pmol/l basal c-peptide). Two groups were subjected to 3 days of recurrent hypoglycemia (RH), while the other two groups were kept hyperglycemic [chronic hyperglycemia (CH)]. All groups subsequently underwent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemic clamp studies on day 4 in conjunction with VMH microinjection with either saline (control) or AICAR (5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide) to activate AMPK. Compared with controls, local VMH application of AICAR during hypoglycemia amplified both glucagon [means ± SE, area under the curve over time (AUC/t) 144 ± 43 vs. 50 ± 11 ng·l–1·min–1; P < 0.05] and epinephrine [4.27 ± 0.96 vs. 1.06 ± 0.26 nmol·l–1·min–1; P < 0.05] responses in RH-BB rats, and amplified the glucagon [151 ± 22 vs. 85 ± 22 ng·l–1·min–1; P < 0.05] response in CH-BB rats. We conclude that VMH AMPK also plays a role in glucose-sensing during hypoglycemia in a rodent model of T1DM. Moreover, our data suggest that it may be possible to partially restore the hypoglycemia-specific glucagon secretory defect characteristic of T1DM through manipulation of VMH AMPK.
  Y Ding , J. D Paonessa , K. L Randall , D Argoti , L Chen , P Vouros and Y. Zhang
 

Sulforaphane (SF) is a well-known chemopreventive phytochemical and occurs in broccoli and to a lesser extent in other cruciferous vegetables, whereas 4-aminobiphenyl (ABP) is a major human bladder carcinogen and is present at significant levels in tobacco smoke. Here, we show that SF inhibits ABP-induced DNA damage in both human bladder cells in vitro and mouse bladder tissue in vivo, using dG-C8-ABP as a biomarker, which is the predominant ABP-DNA adduct formed in human bladder cells and tissues. SF activates NF-E2 related factor-2 (Nrf2), which is a well-recognized chemopreventive target and activates the Nrf2-regulated cytoprotective signaling pathway. Comparison between wild-type mice and mice without Nrf2 shows that Nrf2 activation is required by SF for inhibition of ABP-induced DNA damage. Moreover, Nrf2 activation by SF in the bladder occurs primarily in the epithelium, which is the principal site of bladder cancer development. These data, together with our recent observation that SF-enriched broccoli sprout extracts strongly inhibits N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine-induced bladder cancer development, suggest that SF is a highly promising agent for bladder cancer prevention and provides a mechanistic insight into the repeated epidemiological observation that consumption of broccoli is inversely associated with bladder cancer risk and mortality.

  L Xu , Y Ding , W. J Catalona , X. J Yang , W. F Anderson , B Jovanovic , K Wellman , J Killmer , X Huang , K. A Scheidt , R. B Montgomery and R. C. Bergan
  Background

Dietary intake of genistein by patients with prostate cancer has been associated with decreased metastasis and mortality. Genistein blocks activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and thus inhibits matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) expression and cell invasion in cultured cells and inhibits metastasis of human prostate cancer cells in mice. We investigated the target for genistein in prostate cancer cells.

Methods

Prostate cell lines PC3-M, PC3, 1532NPTX, 1542NPTX, 1532CPTX, and 1542CPTX were used. All cell lines were transiently transfected with a constitutively active mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4 (MEK4) expression vector (to increase MEK4 expression), small interfering RNA against MEK4 (to decrease MEK4 expression), or corresponding control constructs. Cell invasion was assessed by a Boyden chamber assay. Gene expression was assessed by a quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. Protein expression was assessed by Western blot analysis. Modeller and AutoDock programs were used for modeling of the structure of MEK4 protein and ligand docking, respectively. MMP-2 transcript levels were assessed in normal prostate epithelial cells from 24 patients with prostate cancer from a phase II randomized trial comparing genistein treatment with no treatment. Statistical significance required a P value of .050 or less. All statistical tests were two-sided.

Results

Overexpression of MEK4 increased MMP-2 expression and cell invasion in all six cell lines. Decreased MEK4 expression had the opposite effects. Modeling showed that genistein bound to the active site of MEK4. Genistein inhibited MEK4 kinase activity with a half maximal inhibitory concentration of 0.40 µM (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.36 to 0.45 µM). The MMP-2 transcript level in normal prostate epithelial cells was statistically significantly higher in the untreated group (100%) than in the genistein-treated group (24%; difference = 76%, 95% CI = 38% to 115%; P = .045).

Conclusions

We identified MEK4 as a proinvasion protein in six human prostate cancer cell lines and the target for genistein. We showed, to our knowledge for the first time, that genistein treatment, compared with no treatment, was associated with decreased levels of MMP-2 transcripts in normal prostate cells from prostate cancer–containing tissue.

  Y Ding , L Jiao , W Zhang , L Zhou , X Zhang and L. Zhang
 

Sucrose is a convenient, common, tissue-equivalent material suitable for electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry of ionising radiation. A number of publications have reported on the dosimetric properties of sucrose and their use in radiation accident dose reconstruction. However, previous studies did not include specially the description of measurement methods of sucrose by EPR. The aim of this work is to introduce particularly the EPR measurement methods of sucrose. In this regard, practical considerations of sample size, microwave power, modulation amplitude, EPR spectrum and signal stability are discussed.

 
 
 
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