Asian Science Citation Index is committed to provide an authoritative, trusted and significant information by the coverage of the most important and influential journals to meet the needs of the global scientific community.  
ASCI Database
308-Lasani Town,
Sargodha Road,
Faisalabad, Pakistan
Fax: +92-41-8815544
Contact Via Web
Suggest a Journal
 
Articles by X Jiang
Total Records ( 6 ) for X Jiang
  C Cai , D. C Portnoy , H Wang , X Jiang , S Chen and S. P. Balk
 

Prostate cancers (PCa) that relapse after androgen deprivation therapies [castration-resistant PCa (CRPC)] express high levels of androgen receptor (AR) and androgen-regulated genes, and evidence from several groups indicates that ErbB family receptor tyrosine kinases [epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) and ErbB2] may contribute to enhancing this AR activity. We found that activation of these kinases with EGF and heregulin-β1 rapidly (within 8 hours) decreased expression of endogenous AR and androgen-regulated PSA in LNCaP PCa cells. AR expression was similarly decreased in LAPC4 and C4-2 cells, but not in the CWR22Rv1 PCa cell line. The rapid decrease in AR was not due to increased AR protein degradation and was not blocked by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (LY294002) or MEK (UO126) inhibitors. Significantly, AR mRNA levels in LNCaP cells were markedly decreased by EGF and heregulin-β1, and experiments with actinomycin D to block new mRNA synthesis showed that AR mRNA degradation was increased. AR mRNA levels were still markedly decreased by EGF and heregulin-β1 in LNCaP cells adapted to growth in androgen-depleted medium, although AR protein levels did not decline due to increased AR protein stability. These findings show that EGFR and ErbB2 can negatively regulate AR mRNA and may provide an approach to suppress AR expression in CRPC. [Cancer Res 2009;69(12):5202–9]

  Z Han , Z Hong , C Chen , Q Gao , D Luo , Y Fang , Y Cao , T Zhu , X Jiang , Q Ma , W Li , L Han , D Wang , G Xu , S Wang , L Meng , J Zhou and D. Ma
 

Tumor cells acquire the ability to proliferate uncontrollably, resist apoptosis, sustain angiogenesis and evade immune surveillance. Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 regulates all of these processes in a surprisingly large number of human cancers. Consequently, the STAT3 protein is emerging as an ideal target for cancer therapy. This paper reports the generation of an oncolytic adenovirus (M4), which selectively blocks STAT3 signaling in tumor cells as a novel therapeutic strategy. M4 selectively replicated in tumor cells and expressed high levels of antisense STAT3 complementary DNA during the late phase of the viral infection in a replication-dependent manner. The viral progeny yield of M4 in tumor cells was much higher than that of the parent adenoviral mutants, Ad5/dE1A. M4 effectively silenced STAT3 and its target genes in tumor cells while sparing normal cells and exhibited potent antitumoral efficacy in vitro and in vivo. Systemic administration of M4 significantly inhibited tumor growth in an orthotopic gastric carcinoma mouse model, eliminated abdominal cavity metastases and prolonged survival time. In summary, M4 has low toxicity and great potential as a therapeutic agent for different types of cancers.

  X Jiang , J. E Castelao , J. M Yuan , S Groshen , M. C Stern , D. V Conti , V. K Cortessis , G. A Coetzee , M. C Pike and M. Gago Dominguez
 

The aim of this study is to investigate the relationships between hypertension, hypertension medication and bladder cancer risk in a population-based case–control study conducted in Los Angeles. Non-Asians between the ages of 25 and 64 years with histologically confirmed bladder cancers diagnosed between 1987 and 1996 were identified through the Los Angeles County Cancer Surveillance Program. A total of 1585 cases and their age-, gender- and race-matched neighborhood controls were included in the analyses. Conditional logistic regression models were used to examine the relationship between history of hypertension, medication use and bladder cancer risk. A history of hypertension was not related to bladder cancer; however, among hypertensive individuals, there was a significant difference in bladder cancer risk related to the use of diuretics or antihypertensive drugs (P for heterogeneity = 0.004). Compared with individuals without hypertension, hypertensive individuals who regularly used diuretics/antihypertensives had a similar risk [odds ratio (OR) 1.06; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.86–1.30], whereas untreated hypertensive subjects had a 35% reduction in risk (OR: 0.65; 95% CI: 0.48–0.88). A greater reduction in bladder cancer risk was observed among current-smokers (OR: 0.43; 95% CI: 0.27–0.71) and carriers of GSTM1-null (homozygous absence) genotypes (OR: 0.43; 95% CI: 0.22–0.85). Similarly, among smokers with GSTM1-null genotype, levels of 4-aminobiphenyl-hemoglobin adducts were significantly lower among untreated hypertensive individuals (45.7 pg/g Hb) compared with individuals without hypertension (79.8 pg/g Hb) (P = 0.009). In conclusion, untreated hypertension was associated with a reduced risk of bladder cancer.

  D Zhang , X Jiang , P Fang , Y Yan , J Song , S Gupta , A. I Schafer , W Durante , W. D Kruger , X Yang and H. Wang
 

Background— Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Monocytes display inflammatory and resident subsets and commit to specific functions in atherogenesis. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that HHcy modulates monocyte heterogeneity and leads to atherosclerosis.

Methods and Results— We established a novel atherosclerosis-susceptible mouse model with both severe HHcy and hypercholesterolemia in which the mouse cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) and apolipoprotein E (apoE) genes are deficient and an inducible human CBS transgene is introduced to circumvent the neonatal lethality of the CBS deficiency (Tg-hCBS apoE–/– Cbs–/– mice). Severe HHcy accelerated atherosclerosis and inflammatory monocyte/macrophage accumulation in lesions and increased plasma tumor necrosis factor- and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 levels in Tg-hCBS apoE–/– Cbs–/– mice fed a high-fat diet. Furthermore, we characterized monocyte heterogeneity in Tg-hCBS apoE–/– Cbs–/– mice and another severe HHcy mouse model (Tg-S466L Cbs–/–) with a disease-relevant mutation (Tg-S466L) that lacks hyperlipidemia. HHcy increased monocyte population and selective expansion of inflammatory Ly-6Chi and Ly-6Cmid monocyte subsets in blood, spleen, and bone marrow of Tg-S466L Cbs–/– and Tg-hCBS apoE–/– Cbs–/– mice. These changes were exacerbated in Tg-S466L Cbs–/– mice with aging. Addition of l-homocysteine (100 to 500 µmol/L), but not l-cysteine, maintained the Ly-6Chi subset and induced the Ly-6Cmid subset in cultured mouse primary splenocytes. Homocysteine-induced differentiation of the Ly-6Cmid subset was prevented by catalase plus superoxide dismutase and the NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitor apocynin.

Conclusion— HHcy promotes differentiation of inflammatory monocyte subsets and their accumulation in atherosclerotic lesions via NAD(P)H oxidase–mediated oxidant stress.

  X Yang , M Feng , X Jiang , Z Wu , Z Li , M Aau and Q. Yu
 

The Rb–E2F pathway drives cell cycle progression and cell proliferation, and the molecular strategies safeguarding its activity are not fully understood. Here we report that E2F1 directly transactivates miR-449a/b. miR-449a/b targets and inhibits oncogenic CDK6 and CDC25A, resulting in pRb dephosphorylation and cell cycle arrest at G1 phase, revealing a negative feedback regulation of the pRb–E2F1 pathway. Moreover, miR-449a/b expression in cancer cells is epigenetically repressed through histone H3 Lys27 trimethylation, and epigenetic drug treatment targeting histone methylation results in strong induction of miR-449a/b. Our study reveals a tumor suppressor function of miR-449a/b through regulating Rb/E2F1 activity, and suggests that escape from this regulation through an aberrant epigenetic event contributes to E2F1 deregulation and unrestricted proliferation in human cancer.

 
 
 
Copyright   |   Desclaimer   |    Privacy Policy   |   Browsers   |   Accessibility