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Articles by Worapol Aengwanich
Total Records ( 8 ) for Worapol Aengwanich
  Siripan Ponsen , Nual-Anong Narkkong , Supaporn Pamok and Worapol Aengwanich
  Problem statement: Monopterus albus (Zuiew), Asian Eel, is one of the common fish found mainly in Asia. At present, the habitats of Asian Eels have been on the decrease. Contrarily, consumption of Asian Eel has increased. Whereas, data regarding blood cell characteristics, blood cell sizes and hematological values of Asian Eel are limited. As such, the objective of this study was to establish the blood cell characteristics, blood cell dimension and hematological values of capture and culture Asian Eel. Basic knowledge from this study is important for hematological research, conservation, clinical diagnosis and in-depth study of this Eel. Approach: Blood samples of capture (n = 13) and culture (n = 19) Asian Eel, Monopterus albus (Zuiew) were collected in northeastern Thailand. Hematological values, morphometric and morphology of the blood cells were determined using standard techniques. Hematological values and morphometric between captive and cultural Eel were compared. Results: Hematological values and morphometrics of the capture and cultural Eel were not significantly different (p>0.05), but the hemoglobin and neutrophil of the capture eel were significantly higher than those of the culture eel (p<0.05). Neutrophil, monocyte, eosinophil and thrombocyte characteristics of Asian Eel were not different from other Eels. Nucleus characteristics, cytoplasmic shape and nucleus: Cytoplasm ratio of small cell I and small cell II were different. Lymphocyte of Asian Eel was different form the previous report. Conclusion: This study indicated that sources of eel influenced to some hematological values.
  Worapol Aengwanich , Manakant Intarakhamhaeng , Jaroon Wandee , Tanapol Nongbua , Surangkanang Chaiyasak , Prayat Srikot , Komvut Thammasar , Neti Junsanitsri , Khlahan Sritongtuam and Tanat Tawinwaang
  After the outbreaks of avian influenza during the years 2003-2004, Thailand launched many policies to control the spread of the disease such as culling of poultry. Public health measures were also devised to control the transmission of disease to humans and as a result, there was no more report of avian influenza infection in humans after 2007. Based on poultry farming control measure through clustering poultry farms could be classified into 4 groups; namely, poultry farmer communities united before the avian influenza outbreaks, poultry farmer communities united before the avian influenza outbreaks and subsequently implemented cooperative farming system, poultry farmer engaged in contract farming system with large private companies and poultry farmer under compartment system of large private companies. The future direction of these poultry farm clusters should be the improvement of the quality of life of farmers, the promotion of appropriate management and caring of environmental changes, the strengthening of biosecurity, the clustering of farmers within the communities; which would allow farmers in these poultry clusters to have a better quality of life.
  Huo Wei and Worapol Aengwanich
  The objective of this study was to evaluate the biosecurity levels of Poultry Production Clusters (PPCs) in Thailand. Biosecurity levels of poultry farms in the PPCs were determined with criteria specified in biosecurity score form in 3 provinces i.e., Mahasarakham (contract farm with company), Nakhon Phanom (cooperative farm) and Nong Khai (individual farm) in the Northeast region of Thailand. In each province, biosecurity levels were evaluated both in the controlled group and in the cluster (15 farms each). Biosecurity scores were compared between farms in the controlled group and the cluster and among 3 provinces. From the results, it was found that scores of attractiveness to wild bird, measures for visitors and traders, measures for equipments and vehicles of poultry farm, local environment, measures taken at the entrances to poultry sheds in poultry farms and biosecurity plans of poultry farmers in Mahasarakham were significantly higher than in Nakhon Phanom and Nong Khai (p<0.05). The score of measures related to staffs of the poultry farms in Nakhon Phanom was significantly higher than those in Nong Khai (p<0.05). The score of feed quality in Mahasarakham and Nong Khai was significantly higher than that in Nakhon Phanom (p<0.05). In Mahasarakham, scores of local environment and biosecurity plans of poultry farmers of the controlled group were significantly higher than those of the cluster (p<0.05). In Nakhon Phanom, scores of attractiveness to wild bird, measures for incoming poultry, measures for visitors, measures taken at the entrances to poultry sheds and biosecurity plans of poultry farmers in controlled group were significantly higher than in the cluster (p<0.05). This demonstrated that biosecurity levels of contract farm with company were better than cooperative and individual ones. The difference of biosecurity levels was due to the farming pattern, farm’s ecology, the compliance to governmental measures and policies and the ability to invest in biosecurity system of each group. As a result, the scores of biosecurity differed.
  Worapol Aengwanich and Thongchai Boonsorn
  Background and Objective: Cassava, Manihot esculenta Crantz (Euphorbiaceae) leaves contained plentiful of tannic acid. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of tannic acid extracted from cassava leaves on productive performance and ecology within the small intestines of broilers. Materials and Methods: An in vivo experiment was conducted to study the effect of tannic acid extracted from cassava leaves on productive performance, intestinal microflora and gut morphology in broilers. Treatments included an antibiotic-free diet (control group), a positive control diet and an antibiotic-free diet with tannic acid extracted from cassava leaves at 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 mg L–1 in drinking water. Body weight, feed intake, average daily gain and feed conversion ratio were investigated for 6 weeks. At week 6, digesta pH, Lactobacillus spp., E. coli populations and villi height of the duodenum, jejunum and ileum were examined. Results: The results revealed the following: The feed intake of broilers fed a positive control diet was lower than that of broilers fed an antibiotic-free diet with tannic acid at 10, 20 and 40 mg L–1 in drinking water (p<0.05). The body weight and average daily gain of broilers fed an antibiotic-free diet, a positive control diet and an antibiotic-free diet with tannic acid at 10, 40 and 50 mg L–1 in drinking water were significantly higher than those of broilers fed an antibiotic-free diet with tannic acid at 20 mg L–1 in drinking water (p<0.05). The feed conversion ratio of broilers fed an antibiotic-free diet, a positive control diet and an antibiotic-free diet with tannic acid at 10, 30 and 50 mg L–1 in drinking water were significantly lower than those of broilers fed an antibiotic-free diet with tannic acid at 20 mg L–1 in drinking water (p<0.05). The digesta pH in the ileum of broilers fed an antibiotic-free diet with tannic acid at 30 mg L–1 in drinking water was lower than that of broilers fed an antibiotic-free diet, a positive control diet, or an antibiotic-free diet with tannic acid at 50 mg L–1 in drinking water (p<0.05). Conclusion: This study showed that the most suitable level of tannic acid extracted from cassava leaves for broiler was 10 mg L–1 in drinking water.
  Manakant Intrakamhaeng , Tanaya Komutarin , Komkrich Pimpukdee and Worapol Aengwanich
  Methicillin Resistant S. aureus (MRSA) are virulent strains of S. aureus which have become resistant to most antibiotics. The emergence of MRSA is a serious public health concern worldwide. The present study sought to determine the distribution of enterotoxin-producing MRSA in Thailand using multiplex PCR. A total of 375 S. aureus isolates obtained from 598 mastitis cases, 376 bulk tank milk samples and 46 pasteurized milk samples were investigated for phenotypic methicillin resistance. Of these 375 isolates, 74 were found to be methicillin resistant. Variation in the SE encoding genes was detected. A total of 61 isolates harbored at least one classical SE gene, 30 isolates possessed only one type of enterotoxin gene and the remaining 31 were found to be positive for more than one toxin gene. The genes most frequently detected were seb and sed. Isolates obtained from mastitis cases had the highest incidence of enterotoxin genes followed by bulk milk isolates. On comparing the data relative to the different dairy locations, the isolates from Khon Kaen province harbored most detected enterotoxin genes. This was the only location where MRSA isolates from both mastitis milk and bulk milk were found harboring enterotoxin genes. Among the 5 S. aureus strains isolated from pasteurized milk only one isolate was MRSA. The strain which was isolated in Mahasarakham was positive for the sed gene. The current study has detected enterotoxigenic MRSA in mastitis milk, bulk milk and also pasteurized milk from Thailand. Further detailed analysis of functional genomics is now warranted to gain a better understanding of enterotoxin activity and virulence.
  Phiphaporn Ravipolsadtanan , Worapol Aengwanich and Prasopsuk Littidet
  Problem statement: Thai people favored to eat Sweet Wild Trees (Phak Whan Pa). The wild trees naturally grew quite slowly in the forests. Their leaves, eaten as vegetables, could not meet market demand nationwide. Seedling was difficult and people were not interested in planting them. Support from government and/or public sectors was slow. Those were the causes for shortages of the sweet wild trees. The purpose of the study was to study the social capital concerning a conservation of sweet wild trees. Approach: The study was carried out at Sakarat community located in Amphoe Pak Thong Chai Nakhonratchasima. As a qualitative research, documentary and field work data were collected. The 10 informants were planters and government officials responsible for conservation of the sweet wild trees at the Sakarat Environment Research Office. The research results were presented descriptively. Results: The social capitals, to a large extent, arose from shortages of the sweet wild trees, Known as, Phak Whan Pa, in Northeastern Thailand. Yet, the leaves of Phak Whan Pa were not only popular among the Thai people but also they were more expensive than other wild and home grown vegetables. A conservation of these given plants by planting them in their community and near by woods was proposed, implemented and endorsed by community leaders and Buddhist monks. Their objective as an interest group was to grow herbal plants at the Klongtery temple by giving 2-3 Phak Whan Pa seedlings to each family in the community turning such a maneuver a social capital. They often held meetings and spared news in community media, known as, Hor Krajai Kao. Tourist and learning programs were carried out at the Sakarat Environment Research office, such as, planting young plants or seedlings in the community forests protecting them with wooden cages and providing cares so that they survived in own natural setting. Conclusion/Recommendations: The people in the community and near by were allowed to pick the Phak Whan Pa in their community forests and the Taplan National Park. Keeping in mind that a conservation and awareness of the popular wild plants finally paid off and benefited to all concerned people.
  Phiphaporn Ravipolsadtanan , Worapol Aengwanich and Prasopsuk Littidet
 

Problem statement: Thai people favored to eat sweet wild trees (Phak Whan Pa). The wild trees naturally grew quite slowly in the forests. Their leaves, eaten as vegetables, could not meet market demand nationwide. Seedling was difficult and people were not interested in planting them. Support from government and/or public sectors was slow. Those were the causes for shortages of the sweet wild trees. The purpose of the study was to investigate the social capital concerning a conservation of sweet wild trees.
Approach:
The study was carried out at Sakarat community located in Amphoe Pak Thong Chai Nakhonratchasima. As a qualitative research, documentary and field work data were collected. The 10 informants were planters and government officials responsible for conservation of the sweet wild trees at the Sakarat environment research office. The research results were presented descriptively.
Results: The social capitals, to a large extent, arose from shortages of the sweet wild trees, Known as, Phak Whan Pa, in Northeastern Thailand. Yet, the leaves of Phak Whan Pa were not only popular among the Thai people but also they were more expensive than other wild and home grown vegetables. A conservation of these given plants by planting them in their community and near by woods was proposed, implemented and endorsed by community leaders and Buddhist monks. Their objective as an interest group was to grow herbal plants at the Klongtery temple by giving 2-3 Phak Whan Pa seedlings to each family in the community turning such a maneuver a social capital. They often held meetings and spared news in community media, known as, Hor Krajai Kao. Tourist and learning programs were carried out at the Sakarat environment research office, such as, planting young plants or seedlings in the community forests protecting them with wooden cages and providing cares so that they survived in own natural setting.
Conclusion/Recommendations:
The people in the community and near by were allowed to pick the Phak Whan Pa in their community forests and the Taplan National Park, keeping in mind that a conservation and awareness of the popular wild plants finally paid off and benefited to all concerned people.

  Montri Srirajlao , Worapol Aengwanich and Subunn Ieamvijarn
  Problem statement: Para Rubber was an economic wood growing in Northeast Thailand playing economic and social role. The objectives of this research were to study: (1) the economic, social and cultural lifestyle and (2) the appropriate adjustment model of agriculturists or farmers growing Para Rubber in Northeast Thailand. Approach: The research area covered 6 provinces: Mahasarakam, Roi-ed, Khon Kaen, Nongkai, Udontani and Loei. The samples were selected by Purposive Sampling including: 90 experts, 60 practitioners and 60 general people. The instruments using for collecting data were: (1) The Interview Form, (2) The Observation Form, (3) Focus Group Discussion and (4) Workshop, investigated by Triangulation. Data were analyzed according to the specified objectives and presented in descriptive analysis. Results: The farmers’ lifestyle in traditional period of Northeast Thailand was to earn their living from producing by themselves and sharing resources with each other including: rice farming, farm rice growing, vegetable garden growing, searching for natural food without cost wasting one’s capital. When it was period of changing, the price of traditional industrial crop was lowered, the agriculturists began to grow Para Rubber instead since the promotion of governmental industrial section. For the economic, social and cultural changes, found that the agriculturists growing Para Rubber Plantation, had more revenue. But, the mechanism of market price and selling had stability was attached with political situation. For the pattern of adjustment of the agriculturists growing Para Rubber Plantation in Northeast Thailand, found that there was an adjustment in individual level for developing their self study by applying body of knowledge learned by experience of successful people by being employed in cutting Para Rubber in The Southern of Thailand as well as the academic support and selling to serve the need of farmers. Conclusion/Recommendations: Para Rubber was industrial crop in capitalism society. Therefore, it needed to be continuously supported in order to have balance on production.
 
 
 
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