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Articles by W. A. Scherbaum
Total Records ( 2 ) for W. A. Scherbaum
  U. Simson , U. Nawarotzky , G. Friese , W. Porck , Y. Schottenfeld-Naor , S. Hahn , W. A. Scherbaum and J. Kruse
  Aims  Compared to the population as a whole, patients with diabetes mellitus suffer a significantly higher rate of depressive symptoms, especially when they develop complications. Psychotherapy treatments in diabetes mellitus can lead to improvements in both depressive symptoms and glycaemic control. The objective of this study was to investigate whether depressive symptoms can be reduced by psychotherapy treatment delivered as a joint interdisciplinary service to in-patients with diabetic foot syndrome and comorbid depression.

Methods  Thirty in-patients with diabetic foot syndrome and comorbid depression were randomized to either an intervention group (n = 15) with supportive psychotherapy treatment or a control group (n = 15) that received only standard medical treatment. Patients completed a set of questionnaires at the beginning and end of treatment. These recorded sociodemographic variables, anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) and diabetes-related problems (Problem Areas in Diabetes Scale).

Results  Although the diabetic foot syndrome improved significantly in 75% of patients, the extent of depressive symptoms and anxiety reported by the control group did not decrease by the end of treatment. In contrast, in the intervention group, anxiety, depression and diabetes-related problems were all reduced. The extent of anxiety and depression was not, as had been anticipated, associated with the severity of the physical symptoms.

Conclusions  These results indicate that psychotherapeutic intervention during in-patient treatment can have a positive influence on anxiety, depressive symptoms and diabetes-related problems in patients with diabetic foot syndrome.

  M. N. Pham , M. I. Hawa , M. Roden , G. Schernthaner , P. Pozzilli , R. Buzzetti , W. A. Scherbaum , J. Seissler , S. Hunter , R. D. G. Leslie , H. Kolb and N. C. Schloot
  Aims  Systemic concentrations of adhesion molecules and chemokines are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular complications. We compared these factors between patients with Type 2 diabetes vs. Type 1 diabetes or latent autoimmune diabetes in adults.

Methods  Serum concentrations of adhesion molecules sE-selectin, sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1, and chemokines CCL2, CCL3 and CCL4 were measured in 61 patients with latent autoimmune diabetes in adults, 90 with Type 1 diabetes, 465 with Type 2 diabetes and in 41 control subjects, using multiple regression models to adjust for possible confounders.

Results  Patients with Type 2 diabetes exhibited greater concentrations of adhesion molecules (< 0.02) than those with Type 1 diabetes, latent autoimmune diabetes in adults and control subjects. These differences persisted upon adjustments for age, sex, BMI, blood pressure and diabetes duration (< 0.04). Higher BMI positively correlated with concentrations of adhesion molecules in all subjects (< 0.0001). Concentrations of sE-selectin positively related to diastolic (β = 0.31) and systolic (β = 0.28) blood pressure in the adjusted model (< 0.04). Concentrations of the chemokines, CCL2 and CCL4, did not differ between groups, while CCL3 was higher in patients with latent autoimmune diabetes in adults and Type 1 diabetes than in those with Type 2 diabetes and control subjects (< 0.05).

Conclusions  Systemic concentrations of adhesion molecules, but not chemokines, relate to cardiovascular risk factors, but remain higher after adjustments in Type 2 diabetes, suggesting a diabetes-type specific effect without difference between latent autoimmune diabetes in adults and Type 1 diabetes, despite their dissimilar phenotype.

 
 
 
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