Asian Science Citation Index is committed to provide an authoritative, trusted and significant information by the coverage of the most important and influential journals to meet the needs of the global scientific community.  
ASCI Database
308-Lasani Town,
Sargodha Road,
Faisalabad, Pakistan
Fax: +92-41-8815544
Contact Via Web
Suggest a Journal
 
Articles by W. H van Gilst
Total Records ( 3 ) for W. H van Gilst
  J Huzen , P van der Harst , R. A de Boer , I Lesman Leegte , A. A Voors , W. H van Gilst , N. J Samani , T Jaarsma and D. J. van Veldhuisen
 

Background: psychological stress and depressive symptoms have been implicated with accelerated ageing and increased progression of diseases. Shorter telomere length indicates a more advanced biological age. It is unknown whether psychological well-being is associated with telomere length in patients with the somatic condition of chronic heart failure (CHF).

Design: a cross-sectional analysis was used.

Setting: patients were admitted to the hospital with signs and symptoms of CHF.

Objective: the study aimed to assess the association between telomere length and psychological well-being in patients with CHF.

Methods: telomere length was determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction in 890 patients with New York Heart Association functional class II to IV CHF. We evaluated the perceived mental health by the validated RAND-36 questionnaire. Depressive symptoms were assessed by the Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale (CES-D), and the presence of type D personality was evaluated by the DS14.

Results: a lower perceived mental health on the RAND-36 score was associated with shorter telomere length. Adjustment for age and gender did not change our findings (standardised beta, 0.11; P-value, 0.002). Telomere length was not associated with the CES-D or DS14 score.

Conclusion: decreased perceived mental health is associated with shorter leukocyte telomere length in patients with CHF. Future work should determine whether psychological stress accelerates biological ageing.

  R Sofat , A. D Hingorani , L Smeeth , S. E Humphries , P. J Talmud , J Cooper , T Shah , M. S Sandhu , S. L Ricketts , S. M Boekholdt , N Wareham , K. T Khaw , M Kumari , M Kivimaki , M Marmot , F. W Asselbergs , P van der Harst , R. P.F Dullaart , G Navis , D. J van Veldhuisen , W. H Van Gilst , J. F Thompson , P McCaskie , L. J Palmer , M Arca , F Quagliarini , C Gaudio , F Cambien , V Nicaud , O Poirer , V Gudnason , A Isaacs , J. C.M Witteman , C. M van Duijn , M Pencina , R. S Vasan , R. B D'Agostino , J Ordovas , T. Y Li , S Kakko , H Kauma , M. J Savolainen , Y. A Kesaniemi , A Sandhofer , B Paulweber , J. V Sorli , A Goto , S Yokoyama , K Okumura , B. D Horne , C Packard , D Freeman , I Ford , N Sattar , V McCormack , D. A Lawlor , S Ebrahim , G. D Smith , J. J.P Kastelein , J Deanfield and J. P. Casas
 

Background— Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitors raise high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, but torcetrapib, the first-in-class inhibitor tested in a large outcome trial, caused an unexpected blood pressure elevation and increased cardiovascular events. Whether the hypertensive effect resulted from CETP inhibition or an off-target action of torcetrapib has been debated. We hypothesized that common single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the CETP gene could help distinguish mechanism-based from off-target actions of CETP inhibitors to inform on the validity of CETP as a therapeutic target.

Methods and Results— We compared the effect of CETP single-nucleotide polymorphisms and torcetrapib treatment on lipid fractions, blood pressure, and electrolytes in up to 67 687 individuals from genetic studies and 17 911 from randomized trials. CETP single-nucleotide polymorphisms and torcetrapib treatment reduced CETP activity and had a directionally concordant effect on 8 lipid and lipoprotein traits (total, low-density lipoprotein, and HDL cholesterol; HDL2; HDL3; apolipoproteins A-I and B; and triglycerides), with the genetic effect on HDL cholesterol (0.13 mmol/L, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.11 to 0.14 mmol/L) being consistent with that expected of a 10-mg dose of torcetrapib (0.13 mmol/L, 95% CI 0.10 to 0.15). In trials, 60 mg of torcetrapib elevated systolic and diastolic blood pressure by 4.47 mm Hg (95% CI 4.10 to 4.84 mm Hg) and 2.08 mm Hg (95% CI 1.84 to 2.31 mm Hg), respectively. However, the effect of CETP single-nucleotide polymorphisms on systolic blood pressure (0.16 mm Hg, 95% CI –0.28 to 0.60 mm Hg) and diastolic blood pressure (–0.04 mm Hg, 95% CI –0.36 to 0.28 mm Hg) was null and significantly different from that expected of 10 mg of torcetrapib.

Conclusions— Discordance in the effects of CETP single-nucleotide polymorphisms and torcetrapib treatment on blood pressure despite the concordant effects on lipids indicates the hypertensive action of torcetrapib is unlikely to be due to CETP inhibition or shared by chemically dissimilar CETP inhibitors. Genetic studies could find a place in drug-development programs as a new source of randomized evidence for drug-target validation in humans.

  Y Wang , C Qian , A. J.M Roks , D Westermann , S. M Schumacher , F Escher , R. G Schoemaker , T. L Reudelhuber , W. H van Gilst , H. P Schultheiss , C Tschope and T. Walther
 

Background— Angiotensin (Ang)-(1-7) attenuates the development of heart failure. In addition to its local effects on cardiovascular tissue, Ang-(1-7) also stimulates bone marrow, which harbors cells that might complement the therapeutic effect of Ang-(1-7). We studied the effects of Ang-(1-7) either produced locally in the heart or subcutaneously injected during the development of heart failure induced by myocardial infarction (MI) and explored the role of cardiovascular progenitor cells in promoting the effects of this heptapeptide.

Methods and Results— Effects of Ang-(1-7) on bone marrow–derived mononuclear cells in rodents, particularly endothelial progenitor cells, were investigated in vitro and in vivo in rats, in mice deficient for the putative Ang-(1-7) receptor Mas, and in mice overexpressing Ang-(1-7) exclusively in the heart. Three weeks after MI induction through permanent coronary artery occlusion, effects of Ang-(1-7) either produced locally in the heart or injected into the subcutaneous space were investigated. Ang-(1-7) stimulated proliferation of endothelial progenitor cells isolated from sham or infarcted rodents. The stimulation was blunted by A779, a Mas receptor blocker, or by Mas deficiency. Infusion of Ang-(1-7) after MI increased the number of c-kit– and vascular endothelial growth factor–positive cells in infarcted hearts, inhibited cardiac hypertrophy, and improved cardiac function 3 weeks after MI, whereas cardiomyocyte-derived Ang-(1-7) had no effect.

Conclusions— Our data suggest circulating rather than cardiac Ang-(1-7) to be beneficial after MI. This beneficial effect correlates with a stimulation of cardiac progenitor cells in vitro and in vivo. This characterizes the heptapeptide as a promising new tool in stimulating cardiovascular regeneration under pathophysiological conditions.

 
 
 
Copyright   |   Desclaimer   |    Privacy Policy   |   Browsers   |   Accessibility