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Articles by W Zheng
Total Records ( 6 ) for W Zheng
  A. A Arslan , K. J Helzlsouer , C Kooperberg , X. O Shu , E Steplowski , H. B Bueno de Mesquita , C. S Fuchs , M. D Gross , E. J Jacobs , A. Z LaCroix , G. M Petersen , R. Z Stolzenberg Solomon , W Zheng , D Albanes , L Amundadottir , W. R Bamlet , A Barricarte , S. A Bingham , H Boeing , M. C Boutron Ruault , J. E Buring , S. J Chanock , S Clipp , J. M Gaziano , E. L Giovannucci , S. E Hankinson , P Hartge , R. N Hoover , D. J Hunter , A Hutchinson , K. B Jacobs , P Kraft , S. M Lynch , J Manjer , J. E Manson , A McTiernan , R. R McWilliams , J. B Mendelsohn , D. S Michaud , D Palli , T. E Rohan , N Slimani , G Thomas , A Tjonneland , G. S Tobias , D Trichopoulos , J Virtamo , B. M Wolpin , K Yu , A Zeleniuch Jacquotte and A. V. Patel
 

Background  Obesity has been proposed as a risk factor for pancreatic cancer.

Methods  Pooled data were analyzed from the National Cancer Institute Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan) to study the association between prediagnostic anthropometric measures and risk of pancreatic cancer. PanScan applied a nested case-control study design and included 2170 cases and 2209 control subjects. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression for cohort-specific quartiles of body mass index (BMI [calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared]), weight, height, waist circumference, and waist to hip ratio as well as conventional BMI categories (underweight, <18.5; normal weight, 18.5-24.9; overweight, 25.0-29.9; obese, 30.0-34.9; and severely obese, ≥35.0). Models were adjusted for potential confounders.

Results  In all of the participants, a positive association between increasing BMI and risk of pancreatic cancer was observed (adjusted OR for the highest vs lowest BMI quartile, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.12-1.58; Ptrend < .001). In men, the adjusted OR for pancreatic cancer for the highest vs lowest quartile of BMI was 1.33 (95% CI, 1.04-1.69; Ptrend < .03), and in women it was 1.34 (95% CI, 1.05-1.70; Ptrend = .01). Increased waist to hip ratio was associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer in women (adjusted OR for the highest vs lowest quartile, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.31-2.69; Ptrend = .003) but less so in men.

Conclusions  These findings provide strong support for a positive association between BMI and pancreatic cancer risk. In addition, centralized fat distribution may increase pancreatic cancer risk, especially in women.

  Q ZhuGe , M Zhong , W Zheng , G. Y Yang , X Mao , L Xie , G Chen , Y Chen , M. T Lawton , W. L Young , D. A Greenberg and K. Jin
 

A role for the Notch signalling pathway in the formation of arteriovenous malformations during development has been suggested. However, whether Notch signalling is involved in brain arteriovenous malformations in humans remains unclear. Here, we performed immunohistochemistry on surgically resected brain arteriovenous malformations and found that, compared with control brain vascular tissue, Notch-1 signalling was activated in smooth muscle and endothelial cells of the lesional tissue. Western blotting showed an activated form of Notch-1 in brain arteriovenous malformations, irrespective of clinical presentation and with or without preoperative embolization, but not in normal cerebral vessels from controls. In addition, the Notch-1 ligands Jagged-1 and Delta-like-4 and the downstream Notch-1 target Hes-1 were increased in abundance and activated in human brain arteriovenous malformations. Finally, increased angiogenesis was found in adult rats treated with a Notch-1 activator. Our findings suggest that activation of Notch-1 signalling is a phenotypic feature of brain arteriovenous malformations, and that activation of Notch-1 in normal vasculature induces a pro-angiogenic state, which may contribute to the development of vascular malformations.

  Y Wang , J Li , Y Cui , T Li , K. M Ng , H Geng , H Li , X. s Shu , W Liu , B Luo , Q Zhang , T. S. K Mok , W Zheng , X Qiu , G Srivastava , J Yu , J. J.Y Sung , A. T.C Chan , D Ma , Q Tao and W. Han
 

Closely located at the tumor suppressor locus 16q22.1, CKLF-like MARVEL transmembrane domain-containing member 3 and 4 (CMTM3 and CMTM4) encode two CMTM family proteins, which link chemokines and the transmembrane-4 superfamily. In contrast to the broad expression of both CMTM3 and CMTM4 in normal human adult tissues, only CMTM3 is silenced or down-regulated in common carcinoma (gastric, breast, nasopharyngeal, esophageal, and colon) cell lines and primary tumors. CMTM3 methylation was not detected in normal epithelial cell lines and tissues, with weak methylation present in only 5 of 35 (14%) gastric cancer adjacent normal tissues. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry showed that CMTM3 protein was absent in 12 of 35 (34%) gastric and 1 of 2 colorectal tumors, which was well correlated with its methylation status. The silencing of CMTM3 is due to aberrant promoter CpG methylation that could be reversed by pharmacologic demethylation. Ectopic expression of CMTM3 strongly suppressed the colony formation of carcinoma cell lines. In addition, CMTM3 inhibited tumor cell growth and induced apoptosis with caspase-3 activation. Thus, CMTM3 exerts tumor-suppressive functions in tumor cells, with frequent epigenetic inactivation by promoter CpG methylation in common carcinomas. [Cancer Res 2009;69(12):5194–201]

  W Zheng , W Wen , Y. T Gao , Y Shyr , Y Zheng , J Long , G Li , C Li , K Gu , Q Cai , X. O Shu and W. Lu
  Background

Most of the genetic variants identified from genome-wide association studies of breast cancer have not been validated in Asian women. No risk assessment model that incorporates both genetic and clinical predictors is currently available to predict breast cancer risk in this population.

Methods

We analyzed 12 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified in recent genome-wide association studies mostly of women of European ancestry as being associated with the risk of breast cancer in 3039 case patients and 3082 control subjects who participated in the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study. All participants were interviewed in person to obtain information regarding known and suspected risk factors for breast cancer. The c statistic, a measure of discrimination ability with a value ranging from 0.5 (random classification) to 1.0 (perfect classification), was estimated to evaluate the contribution of genetic and established clinical predictors of breast cancer to a newly established risk assessment model for Chinese women. Clinical predictors included in the model were age at menarche, age at first live birth, waist-to-hip ratio, family history of breast cancer, and a previous diagnosis of benign breast disease. The utility of the models in risk stratification was evaluated by estimating the proportion of breast cancer patients in the general population that could be accounted for above a given risk threshold as predicted by the models. All statistical tests were two-sided.

Results

Eight SNPs (rs2046210, rs1219648, rs3817198, rs8051542, rs3803662, rs889312, rs10941679, and rs13281615), each of which reflected a genetically independent locus, were found to be associated with the risk of breast cancer. A dose–response association was observed between the risk of breast cancer and the genetic risk score, which is an aggregate measure of the effect of these eight SNPs (odds ratio for women in the highest quintile of genetic risk score vs those in the lowest = 1.85, 95% confidence interval = 1.58 to 2.18, Ptrend = 2.5 x 10–15). The genetic risk score, the waist-to-hip ratio, and a previous diagnosis of benign breast disease were the top three predictors of the risk of breast cancer, each contributing statistically significantly (P < .001) to the full risk assessment model. The model, with a c statistic of 0.6295 after adjustment for overfitting, showed promise for stratifying women into different risk groups; women in the top 30% risk group accounted for nearly 50% of the breast cancers diagnosed in the general population.

Conclusion

A risk assessment model that includes both genetic markers and clinical predictors may be useful to classify Asian women into relevant risk groups for cost-efficient screening and other prevention programs.

  M. Z Zhang , Y Su , B Yao , W Zheng , M deCaestecker and R. C. Harris
 

Tissue microarray (TMA) is a new high-throughput method that enables simultaneous analysis of the profiles of protein expression in multiple tissue samples. TMA technology has not previously been adapted for physiological and pathophysiological studies of rodent kidneys. We have evaluated the validity and reliability of using TMA to assess protein expression in mouse and rat kidneys. A representative TMA block that we have produced included: (1) mouse and rat kidney cortex, outer medulla, and inner medulla fixed with different fixatives; (2) rat kidneys at different stages of development fixed with different fixatives; (3) mouse and rat kidneys with different physiological or pathophysiological treatments; and (4) built-in controls. As examples of the utility, immunostaining for cyclooxygenase-2, renin, Tamm Horsfall protein, aquaporin-2, connective tissue growth factor, and synaptopodin was carried out with kidney TMA slides. Quantitative analysis of cyclooxygense-2 expression in kidneys confirms that individual cores provide meaningful representations comparable to whole-kidney sections. These studies show that kidney TMA technique is a promising and useful tool for investigating the expression profiles of proteins of interest in rodent kidneys under different physiological and pathophysiological conditions. (J Histochem Cytochem 58:413–420, 2010)

  X. H Li , A. H Kishore , D Dao , W Zheng , C. A Roman and R. A. Word
 

Cervical ripening during pregnancy is a profound change in cervix structure and function characterized by increases in the proinflammatory cytokine IL-8 and dissolution of the cervical extracellular matrix. Relatively little is known about the molecular mechanisms that underlie these events. Here, we report identification of a novel isoform of micropthalmia-associated transcription factor in human cervical stromal cells (MiTF-CX) that is down-regulated 12-fold during cervical ripening and that represses expression of IL-8. Ectopic expression of MiTF-CX in human cervical stromal cells resulted in substantial suppression of endogenous IL-8 mRNA and protein expression, whereas expression of dominant negative MiTF-CX mutants with impaired DNA binding resulted in dramatic increases in IL-8 production. Gel shift, reporter gene, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed one strong binding site (E-box -397 CACATG-391) in the human IL-8 promoter that was crucial for mediating transcriptional repression by MiTF-CX. Moreover, we show that MiTF-CX expression in the cervix was itself positively autoregulated via two E-box motifs within a 2.1-kb promoter fragment. We therefore propose that maintenance of cervical competency during pregnancy is an active process maintained through suppression of IL-8 by the transcription factor MiTF-CX. During cervical ripening, loss of MiTF-CX would result in significant up-regulation of IL-8 mRNA and protein synthesis, thereby leading to recruitment and activation of leukocytes within the cervix and dissolution of the extracellular matrix.

 
 
 
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