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Articles by W Wu
Total Records ( 11 ) for W Wu
  M Inglese , G Madelin , N Oesingmann , J. S Babb , W Wu , B Stoeckel , J Herbert and G. Johnson
 

Neuro-axonal degeneration occurs progressively from the onset of multiple sclerosis and is thought to be a significant cause of increasing clinical disability. Several histopathological studies of multiple sclerosis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis have shown that the accumulation of sodium in axons can promote reverse action of the sodium/calcium exchanger that, in turn, leads to a lethal overload in intra-axonal calcium. We hypothesized that sodium magnetic resonance imaging would provide an indicator of cellular and metabolic integrity and ion homeostasis in patients with multiple sclerosis. Using a three-dimensional radial gradient-echo sequence with short echo time, we performed sodium magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T in 17 patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis and in 13 normal subjects. The absolute total tissue sodium concentration was measured in lesions and in several areas of normal-appearing white and grey matter in patients, and corresponding areas of white and grey matter in controls. A mixed model analysis of covariance was performed to compare regional tissue sodium concentration levels in patients and controls. Spearman correlations were used to determine the association of regional tissue sodium concentration levels in T2- and T1-weighted lesions with measures of normalized whole brain and grey and white matter volumes, and with expanded disability status scale scores. In patients, tissue sodium concentration levels were found to be elevated in acute and chronic lesions compared to areas of normal-appearing white matter (P < 0.0001). The tissue sodium concentration levels in areas of normal-appearing white matter were significantly higher than those in corresponding white matter regions in healthy controls (P < 0.0001). The tissue sodium concentration value averaged over lesions and over regions of normal-appearing white and grey matter was positively associated with T2-weighted (P ≤ 0.001 for all) and T1-weighted (P ≤ 0.006 for all) lesion volumes. In patients, only the tissue sodium concentration value averaged over regions of normal-appearing grey matter was negatively associated with the normalized grey matter volume (P = 0.0009). Finally, the expanded disability status scale score showed a mild, positive association with the mean tissue sodium concentration value in chronic lesions (P = 0.002), in regions of normal-appearing white matter (P = 0.004) and normal-appearing grey matter (P = 0.002). This study shows the feasibility of using in vivo sodium magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T in patients with multiple sclerosis. Our findings suggest that the abnormal values of the tissue sodium concentration in patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis might reflect changes in cellular composition of the lesions and/or changes in cellular and metabolic integrity. Sodium magnetic resonance imaging has the potential to provide insight into the pathophysiological mechanisms of tissue injury when correlation with histopathology becomes available.

  S Zhang , J Lu , X Zhao , W Wu , H Wang , Q Wu , X Chen , W Fan , H Chen , F Wang , Z Hu , L Jin , Q Wei , H Shen , W Huang and D. Lu
 

Checkpoint kinase (CHEK) 2, a tumor suppressor gene, plays an essential role in the DNA damage checkpoint response cascade. We first investigated two polymorphisms in the proximal promoter of the CHEK2 gene and evaluated their associations with the risk of lung cancer in a case–control study using 500 incident lung cancer cases and 517 cancer-free controls. We found that CHEK2 rs2236141 –48 G > A was significantly associated with lung cancer risk (P = 0.0018). Similar results were obtained in a follow-up replication study in 575 lung cancer patients and 589 controls (P = 0.042). Quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed that individuals with the G allele had lower levels of CHEK2 transcripts in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and normal lung tissues. The –48 G->A variant eliminated a methylation site and thereby relieve the transcriptional repression of CHEK2. Therefore, this polymorphism affected downstream transcription through genetic and epigenetic modifications. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that the major G allele significantly attenuated reporter gene expression when methylated. Electrophoretic Mobility shift assays and surface plasmon resonance revealed that the methylated G allele increased transcription factor accessibility. We used in vivo chromatin immunoprecipitation to confirm that the relevant transcription factor was Sp1. Using lung tissue heterozygous for the G/A single-nucleotide polymorphism, we found that Sp1 acted as a repressor and had a stronger binding affinity for the G allele. These results support our hypothesis that the CHEK2 rs2236141 variant modifies lung cancer susceptibility in the Chinese population by affecting CHEK2 expression.

  X Cui , Y Jin , D Poudyal , A. A Chumanevich , T Davis , A Windust , A Hofseth , W Wu , J Habiger , E Pena , P Wood , M Nagarkatti , P. S Nagarkatti and L. Hofseth
 

We have recently shown that American ginseng (AG) prevents and treats mouse colitis. Because both mice and humans with chronic colitis have a high colon cancer risk, we tested the hypothesis that AG can be used to prevent colitis-driven colon cancer. Using the azoxymethane (AOM)/dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) mouse model of ulcerative colitis, we show that AG can suppress colon cancer associated with colitis. To explore the molecular mechanisms of the anticancer effects of AG, we also carried out antibody array experiments on colon cells isolated at a precancerous stage. We found there were 82 protein end points that were either significantly higher (41 proteins) or significantly lower (41 proteins) in the AOM + DSS group compared with the AOM-alone (control) group. In contrast, there were only 19 protein end points that were either significantly higher (10 proteins) or significantly lower (9 proteins) in the AOM + DSS + AG group compared with the AOM-alone (control) group. Overall, these results suggest that AG keeps the colon environment in metabolic equilibrium when mice are treated with AOM + DSS and gives insight into the mechanisms by which AG protects from colon cancer associated with colitis.

  W Wu , W Zhang , R Qiao , D Chen , H Wang , Y Wang , S Zhang , G Gao , A Gu , J Shen , J Qian , W Fan , L Jin , B Han and D. Lu
 

Purpose: Platinum agents cause DNA cross-linking and adducts. Xeroderma pigmentosum group D (XPD) plays a key role in the nucleotide excision repair pathway of DNA repair. Genetic polymorphisms of XPD may affect the capacity to remove the deleterious DNA lesions in normal tissues and lead to greater treatment-related toxicity. This study aimed to investigate the association of three polymorphisms of XPD at codons 156, 312, and 711, with the occurrence of grade 3 or 4 toxicity in advanced non–small cell lung cancer patients.

Experimental Design: We used matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry to genotype the three polymorphisms in 209 stage III and IV non–small cell lung cancer patients treated with platinum-based chemotherapy.

Results: The variant homozygotes of XPD p.Arg156Arg (rs238406) polymorphism were associated with a significantly increased risk of grade 3 or 4 hematologic toxicity (adjusted odds ratios, 3.24; 95% confidence interval, 1.35-7.78; P for trend = 0.009), and, more specifically, severe leukopenia toxicity (P for trend = 0.005). No statistically significant association was found for the three polymorphisms and grade 3 or 4 gastrointestinal toxicity. Consistent with these results of single-locus analysis, both the haplotype and the diplotype analyses revealed a protective effect of the haplotype "CG" (in the order of p.Arg156Arg-p.Asp312Asn) on the risk of grade 3 or 4 hematologic toxicity.

Conclusions: This investigation, for the first time, provides suggestive evidence of an effect of XPD p.Arg156Arg polymorphism on severe toxicity variability among platinum-treated non–small cell lung cancer patients.

  K. D Pruitt , J Harrow , R. A Harte , C Wallin , M Diekhans , D. R Maglott , S Searle , C. M Farrell , J. E Loveland , B. J Ruef , E Hart , M. M Suner , M. J Landrum , B Aken , S Ayling , R Baertsch , J Fernandez Banet , J. L Cherry , V Curwen , M DiCuccio , M Kellis , J Lee , M. F Lin , M Schuster , A Shkeda , C Amid , G Brown , O Dukhanina , A Frankish , J Hart , B. L Maidak , J Mudge , M. R Murphy , T Murphy , J Rajan , B Rajput , L. D Riddick , C Snow , C Steward , D Webb , J. A Weber , L Wilming , W Wu , E Birney , D Haussler , T Hubbard , J Ostell , R Durbin and D. Lipman
 

Effective use of the human and mouse genomes requires reliable identification of genes and their products. Although multiple public resources provide annotation, different methods are used that can result in similar but not identical representation of genes, transcripts, and proteins. The collaborative consensus coding sequence (CCDS) project tracks identical protein annotations on the reference mouse and human genomes with a stable identifier (CCDS ID), and ensures that they are consistently represented on the NCBI, Ensembl, and UCSC Genome Browsers. Importantly, the project coordinates on manually reviewing inconsistent protein annotations between sites, as well as annotations for which new evidence suggests a revision is needed, to progressively converge on a complete protein-coding set for the human and mouse reference genomes, while maintaining a high standard of reliability and biological accuracy. To date, the project has identified 20,159 human and 17,707 mouse consensus coding regions from 17,052 human and 16,893 mouse genes. Three evaluation methods indicate that the entries in the CCDS set are highly likely to represent real proteins, more so than annotations from contributing groups not included in CCDS. The CCDS database thus centralizes the function of identifying well-supported, identically-annotated, protein-coding regions.

  Y Cheng , W Wu , S Ashok Kumar , D Yu , W Deng , T Tripic , D. C King , K. B Chen , Y Zhang , D Drautz , B Giardine , S. C Schuster , W Miller , F Chiaromonte , G. A Blobel , M. J Weiss and R. C. Hardison
 

The transcription factor GATA1 regulates an extensive program of gene activation and repression during erythroid development. However, the associated mechanisms, including the contributions of distal versus proximal cis-regulatory modules, co-occupancy with other transcription factors, and the effects of histone modifications, are poorly understood. We studied these problems genome-wide in a Gata1 knockout erythroblast cell line that undergoes GATA1-dependent terminal maturation, identifying 2616 GATA1-responsive genes and 15,360 GATA1-occupied DNA segments after restoration of GATA1. Virtually all occupied DNA segments have high levels of H3K4 monomethylation and low levels of H3K27me3 around the canonical GATA binding motif, regardless of whether the nearby gene is induced or repressed. Induced genes tend to be bound by GATA1 close to the transcription start site (most frequently in the first intron), have multiple GATA1-occupied segments that are also bound by TAL1, and show evolutionary constraint on the GATA1-binding site motif. In contrast, repressed genes are further away from GATA1-occupied segments, and a subset shows reduced TAL1 occupancy and increased H3K27me3 at the transcription start site. Our data expand the repertoire of GATA1 action in erythropoiesis by defining a new cohort of target genes and determining the spatial distribution of cis-regulatory modules throughout the genome. In addition, we begin to establish functional criteria and mechanisms that distinguish GATA1 activation from repression at specific target genes. More broadly, these studies illustrate how a "master regulator" transcription factor coordinates tissue differentiation through a panoply of DNA and protein interactions.

  Temple The MGC Project Team , D. S Gerhard , R Rasooly , E. A Feingold , P. J Good , C Robinson , A Mandich , J. G Derge , J Lewis , D Shoaf , F. S Collins , W Jang , L Wagner , C. M Shenmen , L Misquitta , C. F Schaefer , K. H Buetow , T. I Bonner , L Yankie , M Ward , L Phan , A Astashyn , G Brown , C Farrell , J Hart , M Landrum , B. L Maidak , M Murphy , T Murphy , B Rajput , L Riddick , D Webb , J Weber , W Wu , K. D Pruitt , D Maglott , A Siepel , B Brejova , M Diekhans , R Harte , R Baertsch , J Kent , D Haussler , M Brent , L Langton , C. L.G Comstock , M Stevens , C Wei , M. J van Baren , K Salehi Ashtiani , R. R Murray , L Ghamsari , E Mello , C Lin , C Pennacchio , K Schreiber , N Shapiro , A Marsh , E Pardes , T Moore , A Lebeau , M Muratet , B Simmons , D Kloske , S Sieja , J Hudson , P Sethupathy , M Brownstein , N Bhat , J Lazar , H Jacob , C. E Gruber , M. R Smith , J McPherson , A. M Garcia , P. H Gunaratne , J Wu , D Muzny , R. A Gibbs , A. C Young , G. G Bouffard , R. W Blakesley , J Mullikin , E. D Green , M. C Dickson , A. C Rodriguez , J Grimwood , J Schmutz , R. M Myers , M Hirst , T Zeng , K Tse , M Moksa , M Deng , K Ma , D Mah , J Pang , G Taylor , E Chuah , A Deng , K Fichter , A Go , S Lee , J Wang , M Griffith , R Morin , R. A Moore , M Mayo , S Munro , S Wagner , S. J.M Jones , R. A Holt , M. A Marra , S Lu , S Yang , J Hartigan , M Graf , R Wagner , S Letovksy , J. C Pulido , K Robison , D Esposito , J Hartley , V. E Wall , R. F Hopkins , O Ohara and S. Wiemann
 

Since its start, the Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC) has sought to provide at least one full-protein-coding sequence cDNA clone for every human and mouse gene with a RefSeq transcript, and at least 6200 rat genes. The MGC cloning effort initially relied on random expressed sequence tag screening of cDNA libraries. Here, we summarize our recent progress using directed RT-PCR cloning and DNA synthesis. The MGC now contains clones with the entire protein-coding sequence for 92% of human and 89% of mouse genes with curated RefSeq (NM-accession) transcripts, and for 97% of human and 96% of mouse genes with curated RefSeq transcripts that have one or more PubMed publications, in addition to clones for more than 6300 rat genes. These high-quality MGC clones and their sequences are accessible without restriction to researchers worldwide.

  Y Gu , X Liang , W Wu , M Liu , S Song , L Cheng , L Bo , C Xiong , X Wang , X Liu , L Peng and K. Yao
 

Context: Hormonal male contraceptive regimens effectively and reversibly suppress sperm production, but there are few large-scale efficacy studies.

Objective: The safety, contraceptive efficacy, reversibility, and feasibility of injectable testosterone undecanoate (TU) in tea seed oil as a hormonal male contraceptive was assessed.

Design: This was a multicenter, phase III, contraceptive efficacy clinical trial.

Participants: A total of 1045 healthy fertile Chinese men were recruited throughout China into the study.

Intervention(s): Injections of 500 mg TU were administered monthly for 30 months. A definition of severe oligozoospermia (≤1 x 106/ml) was used as a criterion of spermatogenic suppression and as the threshold for entering the contraceptive efficacy phase.

Main Outcome Measure(s): The primary outcome was pregnancy rate in the partner. Other outcomes include: semen parameters, testis volumes, reproductive hormone levels, and safety laboratory tests.

Results: Forty-three participants (4.8%) did not achieve azoospermia or severe oligozoospermia within the 6-month suppression phase. A total of 855 participants entered into the efficacy phase, and 733 participants completed monthly TU treatment and follow-up. There were nine pregnancies in 1554.1 person-years of exposure in the 24-month efficacy phase for a cumulative contraceptive failure rate of 1.1 per 100 men. The combined method failure rate was 6.1%, comprising 4.8% with inadequate suppression and 1.3% with postsuppression sperm rebound. No serious adverse events were reported. Spermatogenesis returned to the normal fertile reference range in all but two participants.

Conclusions: Monthly injection of 500 mg TU provides safe, effective, reversible, and reliable contraception in a high proportion of healthy fertile Chinese men.

  H Wang , D Zhang , W Wu , J Zhang , D Guo , Q Wang , T Jing , C Xu , X Bian and K. Yang
 

Steroid receptor coactivator-3 (SRC-3) has been reported to be overexpressed in the development and progression of many tumor types. SRC-3 has been detected in several lung cancer cell lines, but its expression and clinical significance in non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remain unclear. In this study, 48 NSCLC tissues were collected and tissue microarrays were performed. The expression of SRC-3 was examined using nickel-intensified IHC. The results showed that of these 48 cases, 18 (37.5%) exhibited high levels of SRC-3 immunoreactivity, 23 (47.9%) exhibited moderate levels of SRC-3 immunoreactivity, and 7 (14.6%) were negative; thus, the total frequency of SRC-3 overexpression was 85.4% (41/48). This SRC-3 overexpression frequency was similar to the overexpression frequency observed for squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma (82.1% vs 90%) and for metastasis and non-metastasis patients (84.6% vs 85.7%). Data analysis demonstrated a significantly higher overexpression frequency in male patients compared with that in female patients (88.6% vs 76.9%). However, female patients tended to have higher expression levels of SRC-3, as measured by immunoreactivity, than male patients. These results demonstrate a high frequency of SRC-3 overexpression in NSCLC with a gender difference, suggesting that there is a specific role for SRC-3 in the pathogenesis of NSCLC. (J Histochem Cytochem 58:1121–1127, 2010)

  G. M Polzin , W Wu , X Yan , J. M McCraw , S Abdul Salaam , A. D Tavakoli , L Zhang , D. L Ashley and C. H. Watson
  Introduction:

Standardized machine smoking measurements are poor predictors of exposure. We have refined a method using the solanesol deposited in discarded cigarette butts as a marker for estimating deliveries of mainstream smoke constituents. Developing a fast and accurate method for measuring solanesol in cigarette filters to assess tobacco smoke intake could provide a way to assess how people smoke under natural conditions. We have developed and validated a new, lower-cost, high-throughput method to measure the solanesol content in discarded cigarette filter butts and correlated these measurements with mainstream smoke deliveries of nicotine and tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNAs).

Methods:

Cigarettes were machine smoked under a variety of conditions to cover a wide range of nicotine deliveries and solanesol levels in the spent cigarette filter. Following machine smoking, a 1-cm portion of filter material, measured from the mouth end, was removed from the cigarette butts for analysis. Although an isotopically labeled solanesol analog is currently not commercially available, we achieved excellent quantitative results using a structurally similar compound, geranylgeraniol, as an internal standard (IS). After spiking with IS and solvent extracted, solanesol extracts were then analyzed using liquid chromatography coupled with a single-quadrupole mass analyzer. Analysis was carried out using manual preparation as well as a high-throughput 48-well format using automated liquid handlers.

Results:

Recoveries of solanesol from cigarette butts exceeded 95% with excellent precision and exhibited excellent linearity for both preparation methods. In addition, we show that the mouth-level exposure for both nicotine and TSNAs may be estimated by their relation to the solanesol retained in the cigarette filter.

Discussion:

We believe that this method provides excellent versatility and throughput for the estimation of mouth-level exposure to a wide range of toxins in cigarette smoke under naturalistic conditions. In addition, this method allows a far more accurate measure of exposure both from a single cigarette as well as from daily smoking.

  W Wu , M. E Baker , S. A Eraly , K. T Bush and S. K. Nigam
 

When the organic anion transporter Oat1 was first identified as NKT (Lopez-Nieto CE, You G, Bush KT, Barros EJ, Beier DR, Nigam SK. J Biol Chem 272: 6471–6478, 1997), it was argued that it, together with Oct1, may be part of a larger subfamily (now known as SLC22) involved in organic ion and xenobiotic transport. The least studied among SLC22 transporters are the so-called unknown substrate transporters (USTs). Here, five novel genes located in a cluster on mouse chromosome 19, immediately between Slc22a8 (Oat3)/Slc22a6 (Oat1) and Slc22a19 (Oat5), were identified as homologs of human USTs. These genes display preferential expression in liver and kidney, and one gene, AB056422, has several splicing variants with differential tissue expression and embryonic expression. Along with Slc22a6, Slc22a8, and Slc22a19, these Usts define the largest known cluster of mammalian Slc22 genes. Given the established functions of Oats, these genes may also be involved in organic anion transport. Usts have characteristic motifs and share a signature residue in the possible active site of transmembrane domain 7, a conserved, positively charged, amino acid, Arg356, possibly a site for interaction with organic anions. In certain species, Oat1 and Oat3 appeared to be highly conserved, whereas the Ust part of this cluster appeared to undergo repeated species-specific amplification, suggesting strong environmental selection pressure, and perhaps providing an explanation for copy number variation in the human locus. One Ust amplification in mouse appears to be recent. This cluster may be coordinately regulated and under selective pressure in a species-specific manner.

 
 
 
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