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Articles by W Wen
Total Records ( 6 ) for W Wen
  S. A Lee , X. O Shu , H Li , G Yang , H Cai , W Wen , B. T Ji , J Gao , Y. T Gao and W. Zheng
 

Background: Soy food is a rich source of isoflavones—a class of phytoestrogens that has both antiestrogenic and anticarcinogenic properties.

Objective: The objective was to evaluate the association of adolescent and adult soy food intake with breast cancer risk in a cohort of 73,223 Chinese women who participated in the Shanghai Women's Health Study.

Design: A validated food-frequency questionnaire was used to assess usual dietary intake during adulthood and adolescence. After a mean follow-up of 7.4 y, 592 incident cases of breast cancer were identified for longitudinal analyses by using Cox regressions.

Results: Adult soy food consumption, measured either by soy protein or isoflavone intake, was inversely associated with the risk of premenopausal breast cancer, and the association was highly statistically significant (P for trend < 0.001). The multivariate-adjusted relative risks (RRs) for the upper intake quintile compared with the lowest quintile were 0.41 (95% CI: 0.25, 0.70) for soy protein intake and 0.44 (95% CI: 0.26, 0.73) for isoflavone intake. High intake of soy foods during adolescence was also associated with a reduced risk of premenopausal breast cancer (RR: 0.57; 95% CI: 0.34, 0.97). Women who consumed a high amount of soy foods consistently during adolescence and adulthood had a substantially reduced risk of breast cancer. No significant association with soy food consumption was found for postmenopausal breast cancer.

Conclusion: This large, population-based, prospective cohort study provides strong evidence of a protective effect of soy food intake against premenopausal breast cancer.

  L Shengyuan , Y Songpo , W Wen , T Wenjing , Z Haitao and W. Binyou
 

Objective  To explore the association between hepatitis C virus (HCV) and lichen planus (LP) by performing a meta-analysis of observational studies of the association.

Data Sources  Bibliographical searches were conducted in the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases without any language limitations.

Study Selection  Studies were selected when the following criteria were met: the coexistence of a study group and a control group, the reliable and nonselective use of the reference standards for the diagnosis of LP and HCV, and the proportion of events (the prevalence of HCV in patients with LP or the prevalence of LP in patients with HCV).

Data Extraction  Three investigators independently assessed abstracts for relevant studies, and 2 investigators independently reviewed all eligible studies.

Data Synthesis  Sixty-three articles entailing 7 studies were included in the meta-analysis. For the primary outcome of prevalence of events, the meta-analysis showed that there existed an important association between HCV and LP. In the comparison of the prevalence of HCV exposure among patients with LP with that of control participants, the odds ratio (OR) was 5.4 (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.5-8.3); in the prevalence of LP among patients with HCV compared with the prevalence among control participants, the OR was 2.5 (95% CI, 2.0-3.1). The subgroup analyses with geographical stratification did not show a significant association in studies from South Asia (P = .21), Africa (P = .15), and North America (P = .09), and the subgroup analyses from stratification by LP type also did not show a significant association in the isolated cutaneous type (P = .17). When strict criteria were applied, the results of sensitivity analysis remained robust.

Conclusion  Hepatitis C virus infection is associated with a statistically significant risk for development of LP, suggesting that the presence of either HCV or certain types of LP may be used as a predictive marker of the other in certain geographical regions.

  J Ding , G He , W Gong , W Wen , W Sun , B Ning , S Huang , K Wu , C Huang , M Wu , W Xie and H. Wang
 

Frequent exposure to nickel compounds has been considered as one of the potential causes of human lung cancer. However, the molecular mechanism of nickel-induced lung carcinogenesis remains obscure. In the current study, slight S-phase increase, significant G2/M cell cycle arrest, and proliferation blockage were observed in human bronchial epithelial cells (Beas-2B) upon nickel exposure. Moreover, the induction of cyclin D1 and cyclin E by nickel was shown for the first time in human pulmonary cells, which may be involved in nickel-triggered G1/S transition and cell transformation. In addition, we verified that hypoxia-inducible factor-1, an important transcription factor of nickel response, was not required for the cyclin D1 or cyclin E induction. The role of p53 in nickel-induced G2/M arrest was excluded, respecting that its protein level, ser15 phosphorylation, and transcriptional activity were not changed in nickel response. Further study revealed that cyclin A was not activated in nickel response, and cyclin B1, which not only promotes G2/M transition but also prevents M-phase exit of cells if not degraded in time, was up-regulated by nickel through a manner independent of hypoxia-inducible factor. More importantly, our results verified that overexpressed cyclin B1, veiling the effect of cyclin D1 or cyclin E, mediated nickel-caused M-phase blockage and cell growth inhibition, which may render pulmonary cells more sensitive to DNA damage and facilitates cancer initiation. These results will not only deepen our understanding of the molecular mechanism involved in nickel carcinogenecity, but also lead to the further study on chemoprevention of nickel-associated human cancer. (Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2009;18(6):1720–9)

  Y Wang , W Wen , Y Yi , Z Zhang , R. A Lubet and M. You
 

In the present study, we examined the effect of bexarotene (Targretin) and budesonide in the chemoprevention of small cell lung carcinoma using a lung-specific knockout model of Rb1 and p53. Upon treatment with bexarotene, tumor incidence, number, and load were significantly reduced (P < 0.05). Budesonide treatment trended to inhibition, but the effect was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Immunohistochemical staining indicated that bexarotene treatment decreased cell proliferation and increased apoptosis in tumors. The Rb1/p53 gene–targeted mouse seems to be a valuable model for chemopreventive studies on human small cell lung cancer. Our results indicate that the retinoid X receptor agonist bexarotene may be a potent chemopreventive agent in this cancer type.

  W Zheng , W Wen , Y. T Gao , Y Shyr , Y Zheng , J Long , G Li , C Li , K Gu , Q Cai , X. O Shu and W. Lu
  Background

Most of the genetic variants identified from genome-wide association studies of breast cancer have not been validated in Asian women. No risk assessment model that incorporates both genetic and clinical predictors is currently available to predict breast cancer risk in this population.

Methods

We analyzed 12 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified in recent genome-wide association studies mostly of women of European ancestry as being associated with the risk of breast cancer in 3039 case patients and 3082 control subjects who participated in the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study. All participants were interviewed in person to obtain information regarding known and suspected risk factors for breast cancer. The c statistic, a measure of discrimination ability with a value ranging from 0.5 (random classification) to 1.0 (perfect classification), was estimated to evaluate the contribution of genetic and established clinical predictors of breast cancer to a newly established risk assessment model for Chinese women. Clinical predictors included in the model were age at menarche, age at first live birth, waist-to-hip ratio, family history of breast cancer, and a previous diagnosis of benign breast disease. The utility of the models in risk stratification was evaluated by estimating the proportion of breast cancer patients in the general population that could be accounted for above a given risk threshold as predicted by the models. All statistical tests were two-sided.

Results

Eight SNPs (rs2046210, rs1219648, rs3817198, rs8051542, rs3803662, rs889312, rs10941679, and rs13281615), each of which reflected a genetically independent locus, were found to be associated with the risk of breast cancer. A dose–response association was observed between the risk of breast cancer and the genetic risk score, which is an aggregate measure of the effect of these eight SNPs (odds ratio for women in the highest quintile of genetic risk score vs those in the lowest = 1.85, 95% confidence interval = 1.58 to 2.18, Ptrend = 2.5 x 10–15). The genetic risk score, the waist-to-hip ratio, and a previous diagnosis of benign breast disease were the top three predictors of the risk of breast cancer, each contributing statistically significantly (P < .001) to the full risk assessment model. The model, with a c statistic of 0.6295 after adjustment for overfitting, showed promise for stratifying women into different risk groups; women in the top 30% risk group accounted for nearly 50% of the breast cancers diagnosed in the general population.

Conclusion

A risk assessment model that includes both genetic markers and clinical predictors may be useful to classify Asian women into relevant risk groups for cost-efficient screening and other prevention programs.

  J Lou , I Geren , C Garcia Rodriguez , C.M Forsyth , W Wen , K Knopp , J Brown , T Smith , L.A Smith and J.D. Marks
 

Botulism is caused by the botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), the most poisonous substance known. Because of the high potency of BoNT, development of diagnostic and therapeutic antibodies for botulism requires antibodies of very high affinity. Here we report the use of yeast mating to affinity mature BoNT antibodies by light chain shuffling. A library of immunoglobulin light chains was generated in a yeast vector where the light chain is secreted. The heavy chain variable region and the first domain of the constant region (VH–CH1) from a monoclonal antibody was cloned into a different yeast vector for surface display as a fusion to the Aga2 protein. Through yeast mating of the two haploid yeasts, a library of light chain-shuffled Fab was created. Using this approach, the affinities of one BoNT/A and two BoNT/B scFv antibody fragments were increased from 9- to more than 77-fold. Subcloning the V-genes from the affinity-matured Fab yielded fully human IgG1 with equilibrium binding constants for BoNT/A and BoNT/B of 2.51 x 10–11 M or lower for all three monoclonal antibodies. This technique provides a rapid route to antibody affinity maturation.

 
 
 
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