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Articles by W Maier
Total Records ( 7 ) for W Maier
  R Uher , N Perroud , M. Y. M Ng , J Hauser , N Henigsberg , W Maier , O Mors , A Placentino , M Rietschel , D Souery , T Zagar , P. M Czerski , B Jerman , E. R Larsen , T. G Schulze , A Zobel , S Cohen Woods , K Pirlo , A. W Butler , P Muglia , M. R Barnes , M Lathrop< , A Farmer , G Breen , K. J Aitchison , I Craig , C. M Lewis and P. McGuffin
  Objective

The purpose of this study was to identify genetic variants underlying the considerable individual differences in response to antidepressant treatment. The authors performed a genome-wide association analysis of improvement of depression severity with two antidepressant drugs.

Method

High-quality Illumina Human610-quad chip genotyping data were available for 706 unrelated participants of European ancestry treated for major depression with escitalopram (N=394) or nortriptyline (N=312) over a 12-week period in the Genome-Based Therapeutic Drugs for Depression (GENDEP) project, a partially randomized open-label pharmacogenetic trial.

Results

Single nucleotide polymorphisms in two intergenic regions containing copy number variants on chromosomes 1 and 10 were associated with the outcome of treatment with escitalopram or nortriptyline at suggestive levels of significance and with a high posterior likelihood of true association. Drug-specific analyses revealed a genome-wide significant association between marker rs2500535 in the uronyl 2-sulphotransferase gene and response to nortriptyline. Response to escitalopram was best predicted by a marker in the interleukin-11 (IL11) gene. A set of 72 a priori-selected candidate genes did not show pharmacogenetic associations above a chance level, but an association with response to escitalopram was detected in the interleukin-6 gene, which is a close homologue of IL11.

Conclusions

While limited statistical power means that a number of true associations may have been missed, these results suggest that efficacy of antidepressants may be predicted by genetic markers other than traditional candidates. Genome-wide studies, if properly replicated, may thus be important steps in the elucidation of the genetic basis of pharmacological response.

  R. H Perlis , J. W Smoller , J Mysore , M Sun , T Gillis , S Purcell , M Rietschel , M. M Nothen , S Witt , W Maier , D. V Iosifescu , P Sullivan , A. J Rush , M Fava , H Breiter , M Macdonald and J. Gusella
  Objective

Presymptomatic individuals with the Huntingtin (HTT) CAG expansion mutation that causes Huntington's disease may have higher levels of depressive symptoms than healthy comparison populations. However, the prevalence of HTT CAG repeat expansions among individuals diagnosed with major depressive disorder has not been established.

Method

This was a case-control genetic association study of HTT CAG allele size in two discovery cohorts of individuals with major depressive disorder and comparison subjects without major depression as well as a replication cohort of individuals with major depression and comparison subjects without major depression.

Results

CAG repeat lengths of 36 or greater were observed in six of 3,054 chromosomes from individuals with major depression, compared with none of 4,155 chromosomes from comparison subjects. In a third cohort, one expanded allele was observed among 1,202 chromosomes in the major depression group, compared with none of 2,678 chromosomes in comparison subjects. No clear pattern of clinical features was shared among individuals with the expanded repeats.

Conclusions

In clinical populations of individuals diagnosed with major depression, approximately 3 in 1,000 carried expanded HTT CAG alleles.

  J Treutlein , S Cichon , M Ridinger , N Wodarz , M Soyka , P Zill , W Maier , R Moessner , W Gaebel , N Dahmen , C Fehr , N Scherbaum , M Steffens , K. U Ludwig , J Frank , H. E Wichmann , S Schreiber , N Dragano , W. H Sommer , F Leonardi Essmann , A Lourdusamy , P Gebicke Haerter , T. F Wienker , P. F Sullivan , M. M Nothen , F Kiefer , R Spanagel , K Mann and M. Rietschel
 

Context  Alcohol dependence is a serious and common public health problem. It is well established that genetic factors play a major role in the development of this disorder. Identification of genes that contribute to alcohol dependence will improve our understanding of the mechanisms that underlie this disorder.

Objective  To identify susceptibility genes for alcohol dependence through a genome-wide association study (GWAS) and a follow-up study in a population of German male inpatients with an early age at onset.

Design  The GWAS tested 524 396 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). All SNPs with P < 10–4 were subjected to the follow-up study. In addition, nominally significant SNPs from genes that had also shown expression changes in rat brains after long-term alcohol consumption were selected for the follow-up step.

Setting  Five university hospitals in southern and central Germany.

Participants  The GWAS included 487 male inpatients with alcohol dependence as defined by the DSM-IV and an age at onset younger than 28 years and 1358 population-based control individuals. The follow-up study included 1024 male inpatients and 996 age-matched male controls. All the participants were of German descent.

Main Outcome Measures  Significant association findings in the GWAS and follow-up study with the same alleles.

Results  The GWAS produced 121 SNPs with nominal P < 10–4. These, together with 19 additional SNPs from homologues of rat genes showing differential expression, were genotyped in the follow-up sample. Fifteen SNPs showed significant association with the same allele as in the GWAS. In the combined analysis, 2 closely linked intergenic SNPs met genome-wide significance (rs7590720, P = 9.72 x 10–9; rs1344694, P = 1.69 x 10–8). They are located on chromosome region 2q35, which has been implicated in linkage studies for alcohol phenotypes. Nine SNPs were located in genes, including the CDH13 and ADH1C genes, that have been reported to be associated with alcohol dependence.

Conclusions  This is the first GWAS and follow-up study to identify a genome-wide significant association in alcohol dependence. Further independent studies are required to confirm these findings.

  F Jessen , B Wiese , C Bachmann , S Eifflaender Gorfer , F Haller , H Kolsch , T Luck , E Mosch , H van den Bussche , M Wagner , A Wollny , T Zimmermann , M Pentzek , S. G Riedel Heller , H. P Romberg , S Weyerer , H Kaduszkiewicz , W Maier , H Bickel and Cognition and Dementia in Primary Care Patients Study Group for the German Study on Aging
 

Context  Subjective memory impairment (SMI) is receiving increasing attention as a pre-mild cognitive impairment (MCI) condition in the course of the clinical manifestation of Alzheimer disease (AD).

Objectives  To determine the risk for conversion to any dementia, dementia in AD, or vascular dementia by SMI, graded by the level of SMI-related worry and by the temporal association of SMI and subsequent MCI.

Design  Longitudinal cohort study with follow-up examinations at 11/2 and 3 years after baseline.

Setting  Primary care medical record registry sample.

Participants  A total of 2415 subjects without cognitive impairment 75 years or older in the German Study on Aging, Cognition and Dementia in Primary Care Patients.

Main Outcome Measures  Conversion to any dementia, dementia in AD, or vascular dementia at follow-up 1 or follow-up 2 predicted by SMI with or without worry at baseline and at follow-up 2 predicted by different courses of SMI at baseline and MCI at follow-up 1.

Results  In the first analysis, SMI with worry at baseline was associated with greatest risk for conversion to any dementia (hazard ratio [HR], 3.53; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.07-6.03) or dementia in AD (6.54; 2.82-15.20) at follow-up 1 or follow-up 2. The sensitivity was 69.0% and the specificity was 74.3% conversion to dementia in AD. In the second analysis, SMI at baseline and MCI at follow-up 1 were associated with greatest risk for conversion to any dementia (odds ratio [OR], 8.92; 95% CI, 3.69-21.60) or dementia in AD (19.33; 5.29-70.81) at follow-up 2. Furthermore, SMI at baseline and amnestic MCI at follow-up 1 increased the risk for conversion to any dementia (OR, 29.24; 95% CI, 8.75-97.78) or dementia in AD (60.28; 12.23-297.10), with a sensitivity of 66.7% and a specificity of 98.3% for conversion to dementia in AD.

Conclusion  The prediction of dementia in AD by SMI with subsequent amnestic MCI supports the model of a consecutive 3-stage clinical manifestation of AD from SMI via MCI to dementia.

  O. A Onur , H Walter , T. E Schlaepfer , A. K Rehme , C Schmidt , C Keysers , W Maier and R. Hurlemann
 

Multiple lines of evidence implicate the basolateral amygdala (BLA) and the noradrenergic (norepinephrine, NE) system in responding to stressful stimuli such as fear signals, suggesting hyperfunction of both in the development of stress-related pathologies including anxiety disorders. However, no causative link between elevated NE neurotransmission and BLA hyperresponsiveness to fear signals has been established to date in humans. To determine whether or not increased noradrenergic tone enhances BLA responses to fear signals, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and a strategy of pharmacologically potentiating NE neurotransmission in healthy volunteers. 18 subjects were scanned two times on a facial emotion paradigm and given either a single-dose placebo or 4 mg of the selective NE reuptake inhibitor reboxetine 2 h prior to an fMRI session. We found that reboxetine induced an amygdala response bias towards fear signals that did not exist at placebo baseline. This pharmacological effect was probabilistically mapped to the BLA. Extrapolation of our data to conditions of traumatic stress suggests that disinhibited endogenous NE signaling could serve as a crucial etiological contributor to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) by eliciting exaggerated BLA responses to fear signals.

  P Huezo Diaz , R Uher , R Smith , M Rietschel , N Henigsberg , A Marusic , O Mors , W Maier , J Hauser , D Souery , A Placentino , A Zobel , E. R Larsen , P. M Czerski , B Gupta , F Hoda , N Perroud , A Farmer , I Craig , K. J Aitchison and P. McGuffin
 

Background

There have been conflicting reports on whether the length polymorphism in the promoter of the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) moderates the antidepressant effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). We hypothesised that the pharmacogenetic effect of 5-HTTLPR is modulated by gender, age and other variants in the serotonin transporter gene.

Aims

To test the hypothesis that the 5-HTTLPR differently influences response to escitalopram (an SSRI) compared with nortriptyline (a noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor).

Method

The 5-HTTLPR and 13 additional markers across the serotonin transporter gene were genotyped in 795 adults with moderate-to-severe depression treated with escitalopram or nortriptyline in the Genome Based Therapeutic Drugs for Depression (GENDEP) project.

Results

The 5-HTTLPR moderated the response to escitalopram, with long-allele carriers improving more than short-allele homozygotes. A significant three-way interaction between 5-HTTLPR, drug and gender indicated that the effect was concentrated in males treated with escitalopram. The single-nucleotide polymorphism rs2020933 also influenced outcome.

Conclusions

The effect of 5-HTTLPR on antidepressant response is SSRI specific conditional on gender and modulated by another polymorphism at the 5' end of the serotonin transporter gene.

  R Uher , A Farmer , N Henigsberg , M Rietschel , O Mors , W Maier , D Kozel , J Hauser , D Souery , A Placentino , J Strohmaier , N Perroud , A Zobel , A Rajewska Rager , M. Z Dernovsek , E. R Larsen , P Kalember , C Giovannini , M Barreto , P McGuffin and K. J. Aitchison
 

Background

Adverse drug reactions are important determinants of non-adherence to antidepressant treatment, but their assessment is complicated by overlap with depressive symptoms and lack of reliable self-report measures.

Aims

To evaluate a simple self-report measure and describe adverse reactions to antidepressants in a large sample.

Method

The newly developed self-report Antidepressant Side-Effect Checklist and the psychiatrist-rated UKU Side Effect Rating Scale were repeatedly administered to 811 adult participants with depression in a part-randomised multicentre open-label study comparing escitalopram and nortriptyline.

Results

There was good agreement between self-report and psychiatrists’ ratings. Most complaints listed as adverse reactions in people with depression were more common when they were medication-free rather than during their treatment with antidepressants. Dry mouth (74%), constipation (33%) and weight gain (15%) were associated with nortriptyline treatment. Diarrhoea (9%), insomnia (36%) and yawning (16%) were more common during treatment with escitalopram. Problems with urination and drowsiness predicted discontinuation of nortriptyline. Diarrhoea and decreased appetite predicted discontinuation of escitalopram.

Conclusions

Adverse reactions to antidepressants can be reliably assessed by self-report. Attention to specific adverse reactions may improve adherence to antidepressant treatment.

 
 
 
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