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Articles by V. Vaccarino
Total Records ( 3 ) for V. Vaccarino
  S Su , J Zhao , J. D Bremner , A. H Miller , W Tang , M Bouzyk , H Snieder , O Novik , N Afzal , J Goldberg and V. Vaccarino
 

Background— We explored the relationship of genetic variants of the serotonin transporter gene SLC6A4, a key regulator of the serotonergic neurotransmission, with both depressive symptoms and plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels.

Methods and Results— We genotyped 20 polymorphisms in 360 male twins (mean age, 54 years) from the Vietnam Era Twin Registry. Current depressive symptoms were measured with the Beck Depression Inventory II. IL-6 was assessed using a commercially available ELISA kit. Genotype associations were analyzed using generalized estimating equations. To study how SLC6A4 genetic vulnerability influences the relationship between depressive symptoms and IL-6, bivariate models were constructed using structural equation modeling. Of the 20 polymorphisms examined, the effective number of independent tests was 6, and the threshold of significance after Bonferroni correction was 0.008. There were 6 single-nucleotide polymorphisms significantly associated with Beck Depression Inventory (P≤0.008), including rs8071667, rs2020936, rs25528, rs6354, rs11080122, and rs8076005, and 1 single-nucleotide polymorphism was borderline associated (rs12150214, P=0.017). Of these 7 single-nucleotide polymorphisms, 3 were also significantly associated with IL-6 (P<0.008), including rs25528, rs6354, and rs8076005, and the other 4 were borderline associated (P=0.009 to 0.025). The subjects with 1 copy of the minor allele of these 7 single-nucleotide polymorphisms had higher Beck Depression Inventory scores and IL-6 levels. Further bivariate modeling revealed that 10% of the correlation between Beck Depression Inventory and IL-6 could be explained by the SLC6A4 gene.

Conclusions— Genetic vulnerability involving the SLC6A4 gene is significantly associated with both increased depressive symptoms and elevated IL-6 plasma levels. Common pathophysiological processes may link depression and inflammation, and implicate the serotonin pathway in neural-immune interactions.

  J Dai , R Lampert , P. W Wilson , J Goldberg , T. R Ziegler and V. Vaccarino
  Background—

Reduced heart rate variability (HRV), a measure of cardiac autonomic dysfunction, is a risk factor for coronary artery disease. Diet can influence HRV, but this association may be confounded by genetic and environmental factors.

Methods and Results—

We administered the Willett Food Frequency Questionnaire to 276 middle-aged male twins. We derived a score measuring the extent to which an individual's diet conformed to the Mediterranean diet following a published algorithm. The higher the score, the greater the similarity to the Mediterranean diet. All twins underwent 24-hour ambulatory ECG recording. Time and frequency domain measures of HRV were calculated. Mixed-effects regression was used to partition the association into between- and within-twin pair differences. After adjusting for energy intake, other nutritional factors, shared genes, and common environment, a 1-unit higher score was significantly associated with 3.9% to 13% higher time and frequency domain HRV parameters. Further controlling for known cardiovascular risk factors and use of fish oil supplements and medications did not substantially change the estimates.

Conclusions—

The Mediterranean dietary pattern is associated with higher HRV.

  M. K. Rhee , D. Musselman , D. C. Ziemer , V. Vaccarino , P. Kolm , W. S. Weintraub , J. M. Caudle , R. M. Varughese , J. M. Irving and L. S. Phillips
  Aims  To understand the metabolic and temporal links in the relationship between diabetes and depression, we determined the association between depressive symptoms and unrecognized glucose intolerance.

Methods  In a cross-sectional study, 1047 subjects without known diabetes were screened for diabetes or pre-diabetes using the oral glucose tolerance test and for depressive symptoms using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ).

Results  Mean age was 48 years, body mass index 30 kg/m2; 63% were female, 54% black, 11% previously treated for depression and 10% currently treated; 5% had diabetes and 34% pre-diabetes. Median PHQ score was 2 (interquartile range 0-5). Depressive symptoms did not increase with worsening glucose tolerance, after adjusting for age, sex, ethnicity, body mass index, family history, exercise, education and depression treatment.

Conclusions  There is no association between depressive symptoms and unrecognized glucose intolerance. However, it remains possible that diagnosed diabetes, with its attendant health concerns, management issues, and/or biological changes, may be a risk for subsequent development of depression. Thus, patients with newly diagnosed diabetes should be counselled appropriately and monitored for the development of depression.

 
 
 
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