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Articles by V. S Pankratz
Total Records ( 4 ) for V. S Pankratz
  J Molano , B Boeve , T Ferman , G Smith , J Parisi , D Dickson , D Knopman , N Graff Radford , Y Geda , J Lucas , K Kantarci , M Shiung , C Jack , M Silber , V. S Pankratz and R. Petersen
 

There are little data on the relationship between Lewy body disease and mild cognitive impairment syndromes. The Mayo Clinic aging and dementia databases in Rochester, Minnesota, and Jacksonville, Florida were queried for cases who were diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment between 1 January 1996 and 30 April 2008, were prospectively followed and were subsequently found to have autopsy-proven Lewy body disease. The presence of rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder was specifically assessed. Mild cognitive impairment subtypes were determined by clinical impression and neuropsychological profiles, based on prospective operational criteria. The diagnosis of clinically probable dementia with Lewy bodies was based on the 2005 McKeith criteria. Hippocampal volumes, rate of hippocampal atrophy, and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy were assessed on available magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy scans. Eight subjects were identified; six were male. Seven developed dementia with Lewy bodies prior to death; one died characterized as mild cognitive impairment. The number of cases and median age of onset (range) for specific features were: seven with rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder—60 years (27–91 years), eight with cognitive symptoms—69 years (62–89 years), eight with mild cognitive impairment—70.5 years (66–91 years), eight with parkinsonism symptoms—71 years (66–92 years), six with visual hallucinations—72 years (64–90 years), seven with dementia—75 years (67–92 years), six with fluctuations in cognition and/or arousal—76 years (68–92 years) and eight dead—76 years (71–94 years). Rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder preceded cognitive symptom onset in six cases by a median of 10 years (2–47 years) and mild cognitive impairment diagnosis by a median of 12 years (3–48 years). The mild cognitive impairment subtypes represented include: two with single domain non-amnestic mild cognitive impairment, three with multi-domain non-amnestic mild cognitive impairment, and three with multi-domain amnestic mild cognitive impairment. The cognitive domains most frequently affected were attention and executive functioning, and visuospatial functioning. Hippocampal volumes and the rate of hippocampal atrophy were, on average, within the normal range in the three cases who underwent magnetic resonance imaging, and the choline/creatine ratio was elevated in the two cases who underwent proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy when they were diagnosed as mild cognitive impairment. On autopsy, six had neocortical-predominant Lewy body disease and two had limbic-predominant Lewy body disease; only one had coexisting high-likelihood Alzheimer's disease. These findings indicate that among Lewy body disease cases that pass through a mild cognitive impairment stage, any cognitive pattern or mild cognitive subtype is possible, with the attention/executive and visuospatial domains most frequently impaired. Hippocampal volume and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy data were consistent with recent data in dementia with Lewy bodies. All cases with rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder and mild cognitive impairment were eventually shown to have autopsy-proven Lewy body disease, indicating that rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder plus mild cognitive impairment probably reflects brainstem and cerebral Lewy body disease.

  C. R Jack , H. J Wiste , P Vemuri , S. D Weigand , M. L Senjem , G Zeng , M. A Bernstein , J. L Gunter , V. S Pankratz , P. S Aisen , M. W Weiner , R. C Petersen , L. M Shaw , J. Q Trojanowski , D. S Knopman and the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative
 

Biomarkers of brain Aβ amyloid deposition can be measured either by cerebrospinal fluid Aβ42 or Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography imaging. Our objective was to evaluate the ability of Aβ load and neurodegenerative atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging to predict shorter time-to-progression from mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer’s dementia and to characterize the effect of these biomarkers on the risk of progression as they become increasingly abnormal. A total of 218 subjects with mild cognitive impairment were identified from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. The primary outcome was time-to-progression to Alzheimer’s dementia. Hippocampal volumes were measured and adjusted for intracranial volume. We used a new method of pooling cerebrospinal fluid Aβ42 and Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography measures to produce equivalent measures of brain Aβ load from either source and analysed the results using multiple imputation methods. We performed our analyses in two phases. First, we grouped our subjects into those who were ‘amyloid positive’ (n = 165, with the assumption that Alzheimer's pathology is dominant in this group) and those who were ‘amyloid negative’ (n = 53). In the second phase, we included all 218 subjects with mild cognitive impairment to evaluate the biomarkers in a sample that we assumed to contain a full spectrum of expected pathologies. In a Kaplan–Meier analysis, amyloid positive subjects with mild cognitive impairment were much more likely to progress to dementia within 2 years than amyloid negative subjects with mild cognitive impairment (50 versus 19%). Among amyloid positive subjects with mild cognitive impairment only, hippocampal atrophy predicted shorter time-to-progression (P < 0.001) while Aβ load did not (P = 0.44). In contrast, when all 218 subjects with mild cognitive impairment were combined (amyloid positive and negative), hippocampal atrophy and Aβ load predicted shorter time-to-progression with comparable power (hazard ratio for an inter-quartile difference of 2.6 for both); however, the risk profile was linear throughout the range of hippocampal atrophy values but reached a ceiling at higher values of brain Aβ load. Our results are consistent with a model of Alzheimer’s disease in which Aβ deposition initiates the pathological cascade but is not the direct cause of cognitive impairment as evidenced by the fact that Aβ load severity is decoupled from risk of progression at high levels. In contrast, hippocampal atrophy indicates how far along the neurodegenerative path one is, and hence how close to progressing to dementia. Possible explanations for our finding that many subjects with mild cognitive impairment have intermediate levels of Aβ load include: (i) individual subjects may reach an Aβ load plateau at varying absolute levels; (ii) some subjects may be more biologically susceptible to Aβ than others; and (iii) subjects with mild cognitive impairment with intermediate levels of Aβ may represent individuals with Alzheimer’s disease co-existent with other pathologies.

  L. E Kelemen , X Wang , Z. S Fredericksen , V. S Pankratz , P. D.P Pharoah , S Ahmed , A. M Dunning , D. F Easton , R. A Vierkant , J. R Cerhan , E. L Goode , J. E Olson and F. J. Couch
 

Background: Gene amplification leading to overexpression is a common event in breast tumors that is linked to tumor development and progression. The 17q23 region is amplified in >40% of breast tumors and contains several candidate oncogenes. Because common genetic variation in several oncogenes has been associated with cancer risk, we assessed the relevance of common variants in the 17q23 candidate oncogenes to breast cancer.

Methods: We investigated 60 polymorphisms in the TUBD1, SEPT4, PRKCA, TBX2, TBX4, TEX14, TLK2, YPEL2, and PPM1E genes from this amplicon for association with breast cancer risk among 798 Caucasian breast cancer cases and 843 unaffected Caucasian controls from the Mayo Clinic.

Results: Eight polymorphisms in PRKCA, TBX4, TLK2, and YPEL2 displayed significant dose-response associations with breast cancer risk (Ptrend < 0.05). Of these, PRKCA rs7342847 and TLK2 rs2245092 and rs733025 were also associated with hormone receptor–positive breast cancer: PRKCA rs7342847 (odds ratio, 0.7; 95% confidence interval, 0.6-0.9; Ptrend = 0.002) and TLK2 rs733025 and rs2245092 (both: odds ratio, 0.8; 95% confidence interval, 0.7-1.0; Ptrend = 0.03). Interactions between SEPT4 rs758377 and TEX14 rs302864 (Pinteraction = 0.0003) and between TLK2 rs733025 and YPEL2 rs16943468 (Pinteraction = 0.05) for risk of breast cancer were also observed.

Conclusion: These findings suggest that single polymorphisms and combinations of polymorphisms within candidate oncogenes from the 17q23 amplicon may influence risk of breast cancer overall and possibly specific molecular subtypes of breast tumors. The findings are discussed within the context of the results from two independent data sets. (Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2009;18(6):1864–8)

  K Ghosh , C. M Vachon , V. S Pankratz , R. A Vierkant , S. S Anderson , K. R Brandt , D. W Visscher , C Reynolds , M. H Frost and L. C. Hartmann
  Background

Lobular involution, or age-related atrophy of breast lobules, is inversely associated with breast cancer risk, and mammographic breast density (MBD) is positively associated with breast cancer risk.

Methods

To evaluate whether lobular involution and MBD are independently associated with breast cancer risk in women with benign breast disease, we performed a nested cohort study among women (n = 2666) with benign breast disease diagnosed at Mayo Clinic between January 1, 1985, and December 31, 1991 and a mammogram available within 6 months of the diagnosis. Women were followed up for an average of 13.3 years to document any breast cancer incidence. Lobular involution was categorized as none, partial, or complete; parenchymal pattern was classified using the Wolfe classification as N1 (nondense), P1, P2 (ductal prominence occupying <25%, or >25% of the breast, respectively), or DY (extremely dense). Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to assess associations of lobular involution and MBD with breast cancer risk were estimated using adjusted Cox proportional hazards model. All tests of statistical significance were two-sided.

Results

After adjustment for MBD, having no or partial lobular involution was associated with a higher risk of breast cancer than having complete involution (none: HR of breast cancer incidence = 2.62, 95% CI = 1.39 to 4.94; partial: HR of breast cancer incidence = 1.61, 95% CI = 1.03 to 2.53; Ptrend = .002). Similarly, after adjustment for involution, having dense breasts was associated with higher risk of breast cancer than having nondense breasts (for DY: HR of breast cancer incidence = 1.67, 95% CI = 1.03 to 2.73; for P2: HR of breast cancer incidence = 1.96, 95% CI = 1.20 to 3.21; for P1: HR of breast cancer incidence = 1.23, 95% CI = 0.67 to 2.26; Ptrend = .02). Having a combination of no involution and dense breasts was associated with higher risk of breast cancer than having complete involution and nondense breasts (HR of breast cancer incidence = 4.08, 95% CI = 1.72 to 9.68; P = .006).

Conclusion

Lobular involution and MBD are independently associated with breast cancer incidence; combined, they are associated with an even greater risk for breast cancer.

 
 
 
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