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Articles by V Lyssenko
Total Records ( 3 ) for V Lyssenko
  S Enhorning , T. J Wang , P. M Nilsson , P Almgren , B Hedblad , G Berglund , J Struck , N. G Morgenthaler , A Bergmann , E Lindholm , L Groop , V Lyssenko , M Orho Melander , C Newton Cheh and O. Melander
 

Background— Animal studies suggest that the arginine vasopressin system may play a role in glucose metabolism, but data from humans are limited.

Methods and Results— We analyzed plasma copeptin (copeptin), a stable C-terminal fragment of the arginine vasopressin prohormone. Using baseline and longitudinal data from a Swedish population-based sample (n=4742; mean age, 58 years; 60% women) and multivariable logistic regression, we examined the association of increasing quartiles of copeptin (lowest quartile as reference) with prevalent diabetes mellitus at baseline, insulin resistance (top quartile of fasting plasma insulin among nondiabetic subjects), and incident diabetes mellitus on long-term follow-up. New-onset diabetes mellitus was ascertained through 3 national and regional registers. All models were adjusted for clinical and anthropometric risk factors, cystatin C, and C-reactive protein. In cross-sectional analyses, increasing copeptin was associated with prevalent diabetes mellitus (P=0.04) and insulin resistance (P<0.001). During 12.6 years of follow-up, 174 subjects (4%) developed new-onset diabetes mellitus. The odds of developing diabetes mellitus increased across increasing quartiles of copeptin, even after additional adjustment for baseline fasting glucose and insulin (adjusted odds ratios, 1.0, 1.37, 1.79, and 2.09; P for trend=0.004). The association with incident diabetes mellitus remained significant in analyses restricted to subjects with fasting whole blood glucose <5.4 mmol/L at baseline (adjusted odds ratios, 1.0, 1.80, 1.92, and 3.48; P=0.001).

Conclusions— Elevated copeptin predicts increased risk for diabetes mellitus independently of established clinical risk factors, including fasting glucose and insulin. These findings could have implications for risk assessment, novel antidiabetic treatments, and metabolic side effects from arginine vasopressin system modulation.

  J Naukkarinen , E Nilsson , H. A Koistinen , S Soderlund , V Lyssenko , A Vaag , P Poulsen , L Groop , M. R Taskinen and L. Peltonen
 

Background— The upstream transcription factor 1 (USF1) gene is associated with familial combined hyperlipidemia, the most common genetic dyslipidemia in humans, as well as with various dyslipidemic changes in numerous other studies. Typical of complex disease-associated genes, neither the explicit mutations have been described nor the functional consequences for risk allele carriers been reported at the cellular or tissue level.

Methods and Results— In this study, we aimed at describing the molecular mechanism through which the strongest associating intronic single-nucleotide polymorphism variant in USF1 is involved in the development of dyslipidemia. The effects of the risk variant on gene expression were studied in 2 relevant human tissues, fat and muscle. Global transcript profiles of 47 fat biopsies ascertained for carriership of the risk allele were tested for differential expression of known USF1 target genes as well as for broader effects on the transcript profile. Allelic imbalance of USF1 in fat was assessed using a quantitative sequencing approach. The possible allele-specific effect of insulin on the expression of USF1 was studied in 118 muscle biopsies before and after a euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp. The risk allele of single-nucleotide polymorphism rs2073658 seems to eradicate the inductive effect of insulin on the expression of USF1 in muscle and fat. The expression of numerous target genes is in turn perturbed in adipose tissue.

Conclusions— In risk allele carriers, a defective response of USF1 to insulin results in the suboptimal response of relevant target genes that contributes to the enhanced risk of developing dyslipidemia and coronary heart disease.

  E. C Brito , V Lyssenko , F Renstrom , G Berglund , P. M Nilsson , L Groop and P. W. Franks
  OBJECTIVE

Recent advances in type 2 diabetes genetics have culminated in the discovery and confirmation of multiple risk variants. Two important and largely unanswered questions are whether this information can be used to identify individuals most susceptible to the adverse consequences of sedentary behavior and to predict their response to lifestyle intervention; such evidence would be mechanistically informative and provide a rationale for targeting genetically susceptible subgroups of the population.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS

Gene x physical activity interactions were assessed for 17 polymorphisms in a prospective population-based cohort of initially nondiabetic middle-aged adults. Outcomes were 1) impaired glucose regulation (IGR) versus normal glucose regulation determined with either fasting or 2-h plasma glucose concentrations (n = 16,003), 2) glucose intolerance (in mmol/l, n = 8,860), or 3) incident type 2 diabetes (n = 2,063 events).

RESULTS

Tests of gene x physical activity interactions on IGR risk for 3 of the 17 polymorphisms were nominally statistically significant:CDKN2A/B rs10811661 (Pinteraction = 0.015), HNF1B rs4430796 (Pinteraction = 0.026), and PPARG rs1801282 (Pinteraction = 0.04). Consistent interactions were observed for the CDKN2A/B (Pinteraction = 0.013) and HNF1B (Pinteraction = 0.0009) variants on 2-h glucose concentrations. Where type 2 diabetes was the outcome, only one statistically significant interaction effect was observed, and this was for the HNF1B rs4430796 variant (Pinteraction = 0.0004). The interaction effects for HNF1B on IGR risk and incident diabetes remained significant after correction for multiple testing (Pinteraction = 0.015 and 0.0068, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS

Our observations suggest that the genetic predisposition to hyperglycemia is partially dependent on a person's lifestyle.

 
 
 
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