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Articles by Urip Santoso
Total Records ( 4 ) for Urip Santoso
  Urip Santoso , Yosi Fenita and Kususiyah
  Background and Objective: The use of antibiotics as a feed supplement in broiler chickens is not recommended and therefore, antibiotics should be substituted with alternative compounds. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of medicinal herb powder inclusion on hematological status, blood lipid profiles, internal organ weight and toxicity score in female broiler chickens. Materials and Methods: One hundred sixty-eight female broiler chickens aged 15 days were distributed into 7 groups. Each treatment group consisted of 4 replicates and each replicate consisted of 6 broilers. The 7 treatments were as follows: 1) broilers were fed a diet with no medicinal herbs as the control (P0), 2) broilers were fed with 5% Sauropus androgynus (S. androgynus) leaf powder (P1), 3) broilers were fed a diet with 5% bay leaf powder (P2), 4) broilers were fed a diet with 5% basil leaf powder (P3), 5) broilers were fed a diet with 5% papaya leaf powder (P4), 6) broilers were fed a diet with 5% Moringa leaf powder (P5) and 7) broilers were fed a diet with 5% noni fruit powder. Results: Sauropus androgynus leaf contained the highest protein content, at 34.37%, while noni fruit and basil leaf were rich in iron, at 7.80 and 6.43 ppm, respectively, followed by papaya leaf and Sauropus androgynus leaf, at 5.61 and 4.02 ppm, respectively. The noni fruit contained the highest crude fiber content (19.33%) followed by bay leaf (17.73%) and Sauropus androgynus leaf (14.16%). Experimental results showed that medicinal herb inclusion affected WBC (p<0.01) and lymphocytes (p<0.01) but had no effect on RBC, Hb, PCV, MCV, MCH, MCHC and thrombocytes, P4 had the lowest WBC counts (p<0.01). Experimental results showed that the inclusion of medicinal herbs increased HDL (p<0.01), reduced LDL (p<0.05), triglycerides (p<0.01) and LDL/HDL ratio (p<0.01) but had no effect on total cholesterol. Conclusion: Selected medicinal herb inclusion reduced blood triglycerides, LDL and LDL/HDL ratio but increased HDL. Papaya and Sauropus androgynus leaves increased lymphocyte counts.
  Urip Santoso , Yosi Fenita and Kususiyah
  Background and Objective: The use of antibiotics as a feed additive for poultry has been prohibited in many countries because the antibiotics accumulate in the meat, which may stimulate microbial pathogen resistance. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of fermented Sauropus androgynus plus bay leaf inclusion on the hematologic and lipid profiles of female broiler chickens. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and eighty female broilers aged 14 days were divided into 7 treatment groups as follows: 1) the control broiler chickens were fed a diet with a commercial feed additive (contained zinc bacitracin) (P0), 2) broiler chickens were fed a diet with medicinal herb mixture formula 1 at 2.5% (P1), 3) broiler chickens were fed a diet with medicinal herb mixture formula 2 at 2.5% (P2), 4) broiler chickens were fed a diet with medicinal herb mixture formula 3 at 2.5% (P3), 5) broiler chickens were fed a diet with medicinal herb mixture formula 1 at 5% (P4), 6) broilers were fed a diet with medicinal herb mixture formula 2 at 5% (P5) and 7) broilers were fed a diet with medicinal herb mixture formula 3 at 5%. Results: Experimental results showed that the inclusion of fermented Sauropus androgynus plus bay leaves had no effect on thrombocyte levels, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), WBC, RBC, PCV, MCV, MCH, MCHC, liver and spleen weights, intestine length and toxicity but significantly affected the gizzard; the intestine (p<0.01) and heart weights (p<0.05); triglyceride, cholesterol, HDL (p<0.01) LDL and VLDL (p<0.05) levels; and the LDL/HDL ratio (p<0.01). Conclusion: The inclusion of fermented Sauropus androgynus plus bay leaves improved the lipid profile without modifying the hematologic status in female broiler chickens.
  Urip Santoso , Yosi Fenita , Kususiyah and I. Gusti Nyoman Gde. Bidura
  The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of fermented Sauropus androgynus leaves (SAL) on meat composition of broiler meats. One hundred and twelve broiler chicks aged 15 days were distributed to seven groups with four replicates of four broiler chicks each. One group was fed diet without fermented SAL as the control and other six groups were fed diets 2.5 or 5% Neurospora crassa fermented SAL; 2.5 or 5% EM4 fermented SAL and 2.5 or 5% Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermented SAL. It was shown that inclusion of fermented SAL significantly affected the contents of vitamin A, beta-carotene, iron, fat, cholesterol and protein in broiler meats (p<0.01). Inclusion of fermented SAL to diets significantly affected aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, glycine, histidine, arginine, alanine, proline, tyrosine, valine, methionine, cysteine, isoleucine, leucine, phenylalanine and lysine (p<0.01) but it had no effect on threonine. Inclusion of fermented SAL to diets significantly affected myristic acid, palmitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid and linolenic acid (p<0.01). In conclusion, 5% Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermented SAL inclusion resulted in the best broiler meat quality as indicated by lower fat and cholesterol with higher vitamin A, beta-carotene, protein, iron contents with better amino acid and fatty acid balances.
  Urip Santoso , Yosi Fenita and Kususiyah
  Objective: The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of fermented Sauropus androgynus leaf extract on the chemical composition of broiler meat. Methodology: One hundred broilers aged 15 days were distributed into five treatment groups. Each treatment group was represented by four replicates of five broiler chickens each. The five treatment groups were as follows: (1) Broiler chickens were fed diet without fermented Sauropus androgynus leaf extract (FSALE) as the control (P0), (2) Broiler chickens were fed a diet supplemented with 4.5 g FSALE kg–1 diet (P1), (3) Broiler chickens were fed a diet supplemented with 9 g FSALE kg–1 diet (P2), (4) Broiler chickens were fed a diet supplemented with 13.5 g FSALE kg–1 diet (P3) and (5) Broiler chickens were fed a diet supplemented with 18 g FSALE kg–1 diet (P4). Results: The extract contained 25.46% protein, 1.34% fat, 3,642.6 μg β-carotene g–1, 8.17 mg iron g–1 and 0.17 mg sterol/100 mg. The extract was rich in palmitic acid (29.96%) and glutamic acid (2.221%). The results showed that FSALE inclusion significantly increased the contents of protein (p<0.01), β-carotene (p<0.001) and iron (p<0.001) of broiler meats, but it significantly reduced the contents of fat (p<0.05) and cholesterol (p<0.05) of broiler meats. The FSALE inclusion significantly reduced oleic acid (p<0.05) and increased docosahexaenoic acid (p<0.001). In addition, FSALE significantly reduced aspartic acid, serine, glycine, histidine, arginine, threonine and cystine (p<0.01), but FSALE significantly increased glutamic acid, alanine, proline, tyrosine, valine, methionine, phenylalanine and lysine (p<0.001). Conclusion: The FSALE inclusion at level of 4.5-18 g kg–1 in the diet increased the contents of iron, protein and β-carotene but it reduced the content of cholesterol in broiler meat. In addition, FSALE inclusion changed the composition of amino acids and fatty acids.
 
 
 
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