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Articles by U Hoffmann
Total Records ( 7 ) for U Hoffmann
  J Butler , A Kalogeropoulos , V Georgiopoulou , N de Rekeneire , N Rodondi , A. L Smith , U Hoffmann , A Kanaya , A. B Newman , S. B Kritchevsky , R. S Vasan , P. W.F Wilson , T. B Harris and for the Health ABC Study
 

Objective— Resistin is associated with inflammation and insulin resistance and exerts direct effects on myocardial cells including hypertrophy and altered contraction. We investigated the association of serum resistin concentrations with risk for incident heart failure (HF) in humans.

Methods and Results— We studied 2902 older persons without prevalent HF (age, 73.6±2.9 years; 48.1% men; 58.8% white) enrolled in the Health, Aging, and Body Composition (Health ABC) Study. Correlation between baseline serum resistin concentrations (20.3±10.0 ng/mL) and clinical variables, biochemistry panel, markers of inflammation and insulin resistance, adipocytokines, and measures of adiposity was weak (all rho <0.25). During a median follow-up of 9.4 years, 341 participants (11.8%) developed HF. Resistin was strongly associated with risk for incident HF in Cox proportional hazards models controlling for clinical variables, biomarkers, and measures of adiposity (HR, 1.15 per 10.0 ng/mL in adjusted model; 95% CI, 1.05 to 1.27; P=0.003). Results were comparable across sex, race, diabetes mellitus, and prevalent and incident coronary heart disease subgroups. In participants with available left ventricular ejection fraction at HF diagnosis (265 of 341; 77.7%), association of resistin with HF risk was comparable for cases with reduced versus preserved ejection fraction.

Conclusions— Serum resistin concentrations are independently associated with risk for incident HF in older persons.

  G Thanassoulis , J. M Massaro , C. J O'Donnell , U Hoffmann , D Levy , P. T Ellinor , T. J Wang , R. B Schnabel , R. S Vasan , C. S Fox and E. J. Benjamin
  Background—

Obesity represents an important risk factor for atrial fibrillation (AF). We tested the hypothesis that pericardial fat, a unique fat deposit in close anatomic proximity to cardiac structures and autonomic fibers, is associated with prevalent AF.

Methods and Results—

Participants from the Framingham Heart Study underwent multidetector computed tomography from 2002 to 2005. We estimated the association between quantitative pericardial, intrathoracic and visceral adipose tissue volumes (per standard deviation of volume) with prevalent AF adjusting for established AF risk factors (age, sex, systolic blood pressure, blood pressure treatment, PR interval, and clinically significant valvular disease). Of the 3217 eligible participants (mean age, 50.6±10.1 years; 48% women), 54 had a confirmed diagnosis of AF. Pericardial fat but not intrathoracic or visceral abdominal fat was associated with prevalent AF in multivariable-adjusted models (odds ratio per standard deviation of pericardial fat volume, 1.28; 95% confidence intervals, 1.03 to 1.58). Further adjustments for body mass index, heart failure, myocardial infarction, and intrathoracic fat volume did not materially change the association between pericardial fat and AF.

Conclusions—

Pericardial fat was associated with prevalent AF even after adjustment for AF risk factors, including body mass index. If this association is replicated, further investigations into the mechanisms linking pericardial fat to AF are merited.

  C. S Fox , J. M Massaro , C. L Schlett , S. J Lehman , J. B Meigs , C. J O'Donnell , U Hoffmann and J. M. Murabito
  Background—

Central obesity is associated with peripheral arterial disease, suggesting that ectopic fat depots may be associated with localized diseases of the aorta and lower-extremity arteries. We hypothesized that persons with greater amounts of periaortic fat are more likely to have clinical PAD and a low ankle-brachial index.

Methods and Results—

We quantified periaortic fat surrounding the thoracic aorta using a novel volumetric quantitative approach in 1205 participants from the Framingham Heart Study Offspring cohort (mean age, 65.9 years; women, 54%); visceral abdominal fat also was measured. Clinical peripheral arterial disease was defined as a history of intermittent claudication, and ankle-brachial index was dichotomized as low (≤0.9) or lower-extremity revascularization versus normal (>0.9 to <1.4). Regression models were created to examine the association between periaortic fat and intermittent claudication or low ankle-brachial index (n=66). In multivariable logistic regression, per 1 SD increase in periaortic fat, the odds ratio for the combined end point was 1.52 (P=0.004); these results were strengthened with additional adjustment for body mass index (odds ratio, 1.69; P=0.002) or visceral abdominal fat (odds ratio, 1.67; P=0.009), whereas no association was observed for visceral abdominal fat (P=0.16). Similarly, per SD increase in body mass index or waist circumference, no association was observed after accounting for visceral abdominal fat (body mass index, P=0.35; waist circumference, P=0.49).

Conclusions—

Periaortic fat is associated with low ABI and intermittent claudication.

  G Thanassoulis , J. M Massaro , U Hoffmann , A. A Mahabadi , R. S Vasan , C. J O'Donnell and C. S. Fox
  Background—

Pericardial and intrathoracic fat depots may represent novel risk factors for obesity-related cardiovascular disease. We sought to determine the prevalence, distribution, and risk factor correlates of high pericardial and intrathoracic fat deposits.

Methods and Results—

Participants from the Framingham Heart Study (n=3312; mean age, 52 years; 48% women) underwent multidetector CT imaging in 2002 to 2005; high pericardial and high intrathoracic fat were defined on the basis of the sex-specific 90th percentile for these fat depots in a healthy reference sample. For men and women, the prevalence of high pericardial fat was 29.3% and 26.3%, respectively, and high intrathoracic fat was 31.4% and 35.3%, respectively. Overall, 22.1% of the sample was discordant for pericardial and intrathoracic fat depots: 8.3% had high pericardial but normal intrathoracic fat and 13.8% had high intrathoracic but normal pericardial fat. Higher body mass index, higher waist circumference, and increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome were more prevalent in participants with high intrathoracic fat depots than with high pericardial fat (P<0.05 for all comparisons). High abdominal visceral adipose tissue was more frequent in participants with high intrathoracic adipose tissue compared with those with high pericardial fat (P<0.001). Intrathoracic fat but not waist circumference was more highly correlated with visceral adipose tissue (r=0.76 and 0.78 in men and women, respectively; P<0.0001) than with subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) (r=0.46 and 0.54 in men and women, respectively; P<0.0001).

Conclusions—

Although prevalence of pericardial fat and intrathoracic fat were comparable at 30%, intrathoracic fat correlated more closely with metabolic risk and visceral fat. Intrathoracic fat may be a potential marker of metabolic risk and visceral fat on thoracic imaging.

  K Nasir , R. L McClelland , R. S Blumenthal , D. C Goff , U Hoffmann , B. M Psaty , P Greenland , R. A Kronmal and M. J. Budoff
 

Background— Whether measuring and reporting of coronary artery calcium scores (CACS) might lead to changes in cardiovascular risk management is not established. In this observational study, we examined whether high baseline CACS were associated with the initiation as well continuation of new lipid-lowering medication (LLM), blood pressure–lowering medication (BPLM), and regular aspirin (ASA) use in a multi-ethnic population-based cohort.

Methods and Results— The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) is a prospective cohort study of 6814 participants free of clinical cardiovascular disease at entry who underwent CAC testing at baseline examination (examination 1). Information on LLM, BPLM, and regular ASA usage was also obtained at baseline and at exams 2 and 3 (average of 1.6 and 3.2 years after baseline, respectively). In this study, we examined (1) initiation of these medications at examination 2 among participants not taking these medications at baseline; and (2) continuation of medication use to examination 3 among participants already on medication at baseline. Among MESA participants, initiation of LLM, BPLM, and ASA was greater in those with higher CACS. After taking into account age, sex, race, MESA site, LDL cholesterol, diabetes mellitus, body mass index, smoking status, hypertension, systolic blood pressure, and socioeconomic status (income, education, and health insurance), the risk ratios for medication initiation comparing those with CACS >400 versus CACS=0 were 1.53 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08, 2.15) for LLM, 1.55 (95% CI, 1.10 to 2.17) for BPLM, and 1.32 (95% CI, 1.03 to 1.69) for ASA initiation, respectively. The risk ratios for medication continuation among those with CAC >400 versus CACS=0 were 1.10 (95% CI, 1.01 to 1.20) for LLM, 1.05 (95% CI, 1.02 to 1.08) for BPLM, and 1.14 (95% CI, 1.04 to 1.25) for ASA initiation, respectively.

Conclusions— CACS >400 was associated with a higher likelihood of initiation and continuation of LLM, BPLM, and ASA. The association was weaker for continuation than for initiation of these preventive therapies.

  Q. A Truong , E Siegel , M Karakas , J. L Januzzi , F Bamberg , A. A Mahabadi , S Dasdemir , T. J Brady , A Bergmann , J Kunde , J. T Nagurney , U Hoffmann and W. Koenig
 

Background: Stress myocyte biomarkers are used prognostically in patients with cardiovascular disease. We examined associations between amino-terminal pro–B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), midregional pro–A-type natriuretic peptide (MR-proANP), and midregional proadrenomedullin (MR-proADM) concentrations and cardiac chamber volumes in chest pain patients without heart failure by use of computed tomography (CT).

Methods: At the time of 64-slice CT scan, we acquired plasma and serum samples for these biomarkers from 346 patients [mean (SD) age 53 (12) years, 65% men]. Left atrial volume (LAV) and left ventricular volumes at end-diastole (LVEDV) and end-systole (LVESV) were measured and indexed to body surface area (LAVI, LVEDI, LVESI).

Results: Concentrations of both natriuretic peptides were correlated with LAV and LAVI (r = 0.19–0.32, all P ≤ 0.0005) and MR-proADM with LV volumes and indices (r = –0.14 to –0.21, all P ≤ 0.01). NT-proBNP and MR-proANP concentrations were higher in the top quartiles of patients than the lowest quartiles using LAV and LAVI, whereas MR-proADM concentrations were lower in the top quartiles of LV measures. In adjusted analyses, patients had 2- to 4-fold increased risk of LA enlargement for every incremental increase in log10NT-proBNP [LAV odds ratio (OR) 2.4, P = 0.03; LAVI OR 4.0, P = 0.003] and 10- to 13-fold increased risk of LA enlargement for every incremental increase in log10MR-proANP (LAV OR 10.7, P = 0.009; LAVI OR 13.1, P = 0.004).

Conclusions: In patients without heart failure, both NT-proBNP and MR-proANP concentrations are independently associated with LA enlargement, whereas MR-proADM concentrations are correlated with LV volumes. This may partially explain the well-recognized value of natriuretic peptides for use in risk stratification.

  S. A Porter , J. M Massaro , U Hoffmann , R. S Vasan , C. J O`Donnel and C. S. Fox
  OBJECTIVE

Obesity is associated with increased metabolic and cardiovascular risk. The ectopic fat hypothesis suggests that subcutaneous fat may be protective, but this theory has yet to be fully explored.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS

Participants from the Framingham Heart Study (n = 3,001, 48.5% women) were stratified by visceral adipose tissue (VAT) into sex-specific tertiles. Within these tertiles, age-adjusted abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) tertiles were examined in relation to cardiometabolic risk factors.

RESULTS

In the lowest VAT tertile, risk factor prevalence was low, although systolic blood pressure in women and rates of high triglycerides, impaired fasting glucose, hypertension, and the metabolic syndrome in men increased with increasing SAT tertile (all P < 0.04). In contrast, in the top VAT tertile, lower triglycerides were observed in men with increasing SAT (64.4% high triglycerides in SAT tertile 1 vs. 52.7% in SAT tertile 3, P = 0.03). Similar observations were made for women, although results were not statistically significant (50.6% high triglycerides in SAT tertile 1 vs. 41.0% in tertile 3, P = 0.10). Results in the highest VAT tertile were notable for a lack of increase in the prevalence of low HDL in men and women and in rates of impaired fasting glucose in men with increasing subcutaneous fat, despite sizable differences in BMI across SAT tertiles (27.1 to 36.3 kg/m2[women]; 28.1 to 35.7 kg/m2[men]).

CONCLUSIONS

Although adiposity increases the absolute risk of metabolic and cardiovascular disease, abdominal subcutaneous fat is not associated with a linear increase in the prevalence of all risk factors among the obese, most notably, high triglycerides.

 
 
 
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