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Articles by Thomas J. Montine
Total Records ( 4 ) for Thomas J. Montine
  Reisa A. Sperling , Paul S. Aisen , Laurel A. Beckett , Laurel A. Beckett , Suzanne Craft , Anne M. Fagan , Takeshi Iwatsubo , Clifford R. Jack , Jeffrey Kaye , Thomas J. Montine , Denise C. Park , Eric M. Reiman , Christopher C. Rowe , Eric Siemers , Yaakov Stern , Yaakov Stern , Maria C. Carrillo , Bill Thies , Marcelle Morrison- Bogorad , Molly V. Wagster and Creighton H. Phelps
  The National Institute on Aging and the Alzheimer‘s Association charged a workgroup with the task of developing criteria for the symptomatic predementia phase of Alzheimer‘s disease (AD), referred to in this article as mild cognitive impairment due to AD. The workgroup developed the following two sets of criteria: (1) core clinical criteria that could be used by healthcare providers without access to advanced imaging techniques or cerebrospinal fluid analysis, and (2) research criteria that could be used in clinical research settings, including clinical trials. The second set of criteria incorporate the use of biomarkers based on imaging and cerebrospinal fluid measures. The final set of criteria for mild cognitive impairment due to AD has four levels of certainty, depending on the presence and nature of the biomarker findings. Considerable work is needed to validate the criteria that use biomarkers and to standardize biomarker analysis for use in community settings.
  Niklas Mattsson , Ulf Andreasson , Staffan Persson , Hiroyuki Arai , Sat Dev Batish , Sergio Bernardini , Luisella Bocchio- Chiavetto , Marinus A. Blankenstein , Maria C. Carrillo , Sonia Chalbot , Els Coart , Davide Chiasserini , Neal Cutler , Gunilla Dahlfors , Stefan Duller , Anne M. Fagan , Orestes Forlenza , Giovanni B. Frisoni , Douglas Galasko , Daniela Galimberti , Harald Hampel , Aase Handberg , Michael T. Heneka , Adrianna Z. Herskovits , Sanna-Kaisa Herukka , David M. Holtzman , Christian Humpel , Bradley T. Hyman , Khalid Iqbal , Khalid Iqbal , Stephan A. Kaeser , Elmar Kaiser , Elisabeth Kapaki , Daniel Kidd , Peter Klivenyi , Cindy S. Knudsen , Markus P. Kummer , James Lui , Albert Llado , Piotr Lewczuk , Qiao-Xin Li , Ralph Martins , Colin Masters , John McAuliffe , Marc Mercken , Abhay Moghekar , Jose Luis Molinuevo , Thomas J. Montine , William Nowatzke , Richard O’Brien , Markus Otto , George P. Paraskevas , Lucilla Parnetti , Ronald C. Petersen , David Prvulovic , Herman P.M. de Reus , Robert A. Rissman , Elio Scarpini , Alessandro Stefani , Hilkka Soininen , Johannes Schroder , Leslie M. Shaw , Anders Skinningsrud , Brith Skrogstad and Annette Spreer
  Background The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers amyloid β (Aβ)-42, total-tau (T-tau), and phosphorylated-tau (P-tau) demonstrate good diagnostic accuracy for Alzheimer‘s disease (AD). However, there are large variations in biomarker measurements between studies, and between and within laboratories. The Alzheimer‘s Association has initiated a global quality control program to estimate and monitor variability of measurements, quantify batch-to-batch assay variations, and identify sources of variability. In this article, we present the results from the first two rounds of the program. Methods The program is open for laboratories using commercially available kits for Aβ, T-tau, or P-tau. CSF samples (aliquots of pooled CSF) are sent for analysis several times a year from the Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory at the Molndal campus of the University of Gothenburg, Sweden. Each round consists of three quality control samples. Results Forty laboratories participated. Twenty-six used INNOTEST enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits, 14 used Luminex xMAP with the INNO-BIA AlzBio3 kit (both measure Aβ-(1-42), P-tau(181P), and T-tau), and 5 used Meso Scale Discovery with the Aβ triplex (AβN-42, AβN-40, and AβN-38) or T-tau kits. The total coefficients of variation between the laboratories were 13% to 36%. Five laboratories analyzed the samples six times on different occasions. Within-laboratory precisions differed considerably between biomarkers within individual laboratories. Conclusions Measurements of CSF AD biomarkers show large between-laboratory variability, likely caused by factors related to analytical procedures and the analytical kits. Standardization of laboratory procedures and efforts by kit vendors to increase kit performance might lower variability, and will likely increase the usefulness of CSF AD biomarkers.
  John C. Breitner , Laura D. Baker , Thomas J. Montine , Curtis L. Meinert , Constantine G. Lyketsos , Karen H. Ashe , Jason Brandt , Suzanne Craft , Denis E. Evans , Robert C. Green , M. Saleem Ismail , Barbara K. Martin , Michael J. Mullan , Marwan Sabbagh and Pierre N. Tariot
  Background Epidemiologic evidence suggests that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) delay onset of Alzheimer‘s dementia (AD), but randomized trials show no benefit from NSAIDs in patients with symptomatic AD. The Alzheimer‘s Disease Anti-inflammatory Prevention Trial (ADAPT) randomized 2528 elderly persons to naproxen or celecoxib versus placebo for 2 years (standard deviation = 11 months) before treatments were terminated. During the treatment interval, 32 cases of AD revealed increased rates in both NSAID-assigned groups. Methods We continued the double-masked ADAPT protocol for 2 additional years to investigate incidence of AD (primary outcome). We then collected cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 117 volunteer participants to assess their ratio of CSF tau to Aβ1-42. Results Including 40 new events observed during follow-up of 2071 randomized individuals (92% of participants at treatment cessation), there were 72 AD cases. Overall, NSAID-related harm was no longer evident, but secondary analyses showed that increased risk remained notable in the first 2.5 years of observations, especially in 54 persons enrolled with cognitive impairment––no dementia (CIND). These same analyses showed later reduction in AD incidence among asymptomatic enrollees who were given naproxen. CSF biomarker assays suggested that the latter result reflected reduced Alzheimer-type neurodegeneration. Conclusions These data suggest a revision of the original ADAPT hypothesis that NSAIDs reduce AD risk, as follows: NSAIDs have an adverse effect in later stages of AD pathogenesis, whereas asymptomatic individuals treated with conventional NSAIDs such as naproxen experience reduced AD incidence, but only after 2 to 3 years. Thus, treatment effects differ at various stages of disease. This hypothesis is consistent with data from both trials and epidemiological studies.
  Bradley T. Hyman , Creighton H. Phelps , Thomas G. Beach , Eileen H. Bigio , Nigel J. Cairns , Maria C. Carrillo , Dennis W. Dickson , Charles Duyckaerts , Matthew P. Frosch , Eliezer Masliah , Suzanne S. Mirra , Peter T. Nelson , Julie A. Schneider , Julie A. Schneider , Bill Thies , John Q. Trojanowski , Harry V. Vinters and Thomas J. Montine
  A consensus panel from the United States and Europe was convened recently to update and revise the 1997 consensus guidelines for the neuropathologic evaluation of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other diseases of brain that are common in the elderly. The new guidelines recognize the pre-clinical stage of AD, enhance the assessment of AD to include amyloid accumulation as well as neurofibrillary change and neuritic plaques, establish protocols for the neuropathologic assessment of Lewy body disease, vascular brain injury, hippocampal sclerosis, and TDP-43 inclusions, and recommend standard approaches for the workup of cases and their clinico-pathologic correlation.
 
 
 
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