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Articles by T. Ghoorchi
Total Records ( 12 ) for T. Ghoorchi
  T. Ghoorchi , A.M. Gharabash and N.M. Torbatinejad
  An experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of different levels of calcium salt of long chain fatty acids (Ca-LCFA) on performance, blood metabolites, carcass characteristics and feed intake in Atabay lambs. Twenty-eight male lambs with mean body weight of 24.5±0.51 kg and 4 to 5 months age were used in a 90 days feeding experiment. The trial was carried out using Completely Randomized Design with 4 dietary treatments containing 0, 2.5, 5 and 7.5% Ca-LCFA (dry matter basis). At the end of the experiment, 3 lambs from each treatment were slaughtered for carcass analysis. The treatments did not result in significant (p<0.05) differences for characteristics of skin, head, neck, shoulder, chest , ribs, feet, back, hot carcass, heart, kidney, lung, liver and fat-tail weight. The Ca-LCFA level in the diet affected (p<0.05) the triglyceride and glucose concentration of blood serum, but have no effect on Ca and urea. It was concluded that Ca-LCFA of 2.5% is the best level for use in diet for lambs.
  S. Arbabi , T. Ghoorchi and S. Hasani
  The main objective of this study was to determine the effects of organic acid-based additives on the fermentation and delayed ensiling of corn silage. Prolonged exposure to air can adversely affect the silage fermentation process. To investigate a possible method to overcome this problem, we found that when a buffered propionic acid-based additive, is applied to chopped, whole-plant corn exposed to air before ensiling, it will affect the subsequent fermentation. Chopped whole plant corn mixed with 4 different additives consist of propionic acid in addition to control treatment without any additive. Additives were: (1) propionic acid, (2) propionic acid (85%)+formic acid (15%), (3) calcium propionate and (4) propionic acid (80%)+formic acid (15%)+ammonia (5%). The 10 g kg1 dry matter of each additives mixed with chopped corn forage in 3 different times (0 (immediately), 24, 48 h). Silages were assessed by the method of appearance evaluation and DM, pH evaluation. CP, NDF, ADF, TVFA, WSC, so that, the aerobic stability and DM degradation of each treatment were determined after 60 days. Silages that exposed to air for 24 h, before ensiling had better appearance quality than two other delaying time (0 and 48 h) in Filg's method and whole additives in this experiment had good effects on appearance quality in comparison with control group. All of silages containing buffered propionic acid-based additive, in method of DM, pH evaluation, were good and very good. These silages had lower (p<0.05) pH than control ones. Amount of dry matter of control silage which ensiled immediately was lower than other treated silages. NDF in control silages (without additive) was more than that in treated silages and amount of CP and TVFA increased with addition of additives especially those containing propionic acid (85%)+formic acid (15%) (p<0.05). WSC in control silage that wilted 48 h before ensiling was more than other samples (p<0.05). Buffered propionic acid-based additives increased aerobic stability in treated silages in comparison with untreated ones. Degradation of DM (in situ) for untreated silages that delayed ensiled was lower. Application of the additive containing propionic acid (80%)+ formic acid (15%)+ammonia (5%) resulted in highest degradation of dry matter among experimental additives. Generally, treatment with propionic acid-based additives prevented a decrease in DM degradation (in vitro).
  T. Ghoorchi and S. Arbabi
  This study presents results on the crude protein and its components containing A, B1, B2, B3, C, NPN, SP, NDIP, ADIP, degradability, effective degradability of alfalfa, soybean meal, cottonseed meal, wheat bran and beet sugar pulp. The experiments included three fistulated rams fed diets having the roughage and concentrate. The dynamics of the ruminal crude protein degradability of the above protein feedstuffs was evaluated at six incubation times: 0, 4, 8, 16, 24 and 48 h. The results of this study detected that amount of NPN were different in feedstuffs (p<0.05) and alfalfa had 24.85%. Soybean meal had the most of crude protein, B1 and B3, 40.58, 20.53, 59.93% and the less of ADIP or C and B2, 4.11 and 4.09%, respectively. Effective degradability of dry matter with rate of passage equal 8% were in cottonseed meal 20.5%, soybean meal 30.7%, wheat bran 32.9%, beet sugar pulp 35.7% and alfalfa 31.9%.
  M.M. Paviz , T. Ghoorchi and F. Ghanbari
  This experiment was conducted to determine the effects of an inoculant (lactobacillus plantarum, 106 g kg-1 fresh forage) and molasses (%5), on chemical composition and aerobic stability of sorghum (speedfeed variety) silage. The data were analyzed as Completely Randomized Design with 5 replicates for each treatment. The pH of all treated silage was below 4 and did not significantly differ (p>0.05). The DM content was same in all treatments (p>0.05). Ash content was greater in silage treated with molasses than inoculants and control (p<0.05). Crude Protein (CP) did not significantly differ among treatments (p>0.05). Ammonia-N concentration was higher in silage treated with molasses than inoculants and control (p<0.05). Neutral Detergent Fiber (NDF) content did not significantly differ among treatments (p>0.05). Silage treated with inoculant had greater disappearance Acid Detergent Fiber (ADF) compared to silages treated with molasses and control (p<0.05). Crude Fat (CF) was not significantly different among treatments (p>0.05). The pH and temperature was measured regularly each 2 h for 12 days after opening silos. Finally silage affected by additives (p<0.05). Silage treated with bacterial inoculant had higher pH and temperature (4/66, 26/46) compare to silage treated with molasses (4/49, 24/97) and control (4/03, 24/17) (p<0.05). Spoilage in forages tissues was more than in silage treated with bacterial inoculation compare to others (p<0.05).
  S. Arbabi , T. Ghoorchi and S. Hasani
  In order to study the effect of delayed ensiling and application of some organic acid-based additives on fermentation of corn silage, chopped whole plant corn mixed with 4 different additives consist propionic acid in addition to control treatment without any additive. Additives were: 1-Propionic acid 2-Propionic acid (85%) + Formic acid (15%) 3-Calcium propionate 4-Propionic acid (80%) + Formic acid (15%) + Ammonia (5%). 10 g kg-1 dry matter of each additives mixed with chopped corn forage in 2 different times (0.48 h). Silages were assessed using method of appearance evaluation and method of DM, pH evaluation CP, NDF, ADF, TVFA, WSC, aerobic stability and DM degradation each of treatments were determined after 60 days. Silages that exposed to air 48 h, before ensiling had better appearance quality in Filg`s method and whole additives in this experiment had good effect on appearance quality compared with control group. All of silages containing buffered propionic acid-based additive, in the method DM, pH evaluation, were good and very good. These silages had lower pH than control (p<0.05). Amount of dry matter of control silage which ensiled immediately was lower than other treated silages. NDF in the silages (with Propionic acid (85%) + Formic acid (15%)) was lower than the other silages and content of CP and TVFA increased with addition of the additives especially additive containing Propionic acid (85%) + Formic acid (15%) (p<0.05). WSC in treated silage with additive containing propionic acid (85%) + Formic acid (15%) that wilted 48 h before ensiling was more than other samples (p<0.05). Buffered propionic acid-based additives caused to increase aerobic stability in treated silages compared with untreated silages. Degradation of DM (in situ) in untreated silages that delayed ensiled was lower. Application of the additive containing propionic acid (80%) + Formic acid (15%) +Ammonia (5%) resulted in highest degradation dry matter among experimental additives. Generally, treating with propionic acid-based additives prevented degradation DM decrease (in vitro).
  S. Arbabi , T. Ghoorchi and A.A. Naserian
  Silage of orange by-products (mainly the peel) is tested in micro-silos, carrying out and checking 4 treatments: addition of 5% (fresh weight) Dried Citrus Pulp (DCP), of dried sugar beet pulp (DSP), of Wheat Straw (WS) in 2 different times (0, 72 h). Silages were assessed using both method of appearance evaluation and method of DM, pH. CP, NDF, ADF, TVFA, WSC, aerobic stability and DM degradation each of treatments were determined after 60 days. Treated silages had better appearance quality than the control silages in Flieg`s method. All of the silages had good and very good degrees in the method based on DM, pH. The treated silages had no differences pH compared with control. The control group that was sealed immediately, had lower DM content compared with treated silages (p<0.05). Treated silage with WS had the highest content of ADF (p<0.05). NDF in the control silage and the treated silage with DCP was lower than the others (p<0.05) and amount of CP in the treated silage with DSP was more than others (p<0.05). Time of ensiling and treatments made no difference in TVFA content of silages. WSC in treated silage with DCP and DSP were more than other samples (p<0.05). There are significant differences for the concentration of DDM, DE, ME, TDN in the silages. Treated silages with WS had lower contents than the others (p<0.05). The wilting before ensiling caused an increase in aerobic stability in treated silages compared with untreated silages (p<0.05). Application of WS additive resulted the lowest degradation dry matter among the experimental additives (p<0.05). Overall, in our experimental conditions, citrus pulp silage seemed to be convenient for producing animals.
  S. Arbabi and T. Ghoorchi
  The aim of this study was to examine the effect of different levels of molasses on fermentation quality and nutritive value of foxtail millet silage. Silage of foxtail millet is tested in micro-silos, treatments included control (no additive), 2.5, 5 and 7.5% molasses. Silages were assessed using both method of appearance evaluation and method of DM, pH. CP, NDF, ADF, TVFA, WSC, aerobic stability and DM degradation. Each of treatments was determined after 60 days. Treated silages had better appearance quality than the control silages in Flieg`s method. All of the silages had good and very good degrees in the method based on DM, pH. The treated silages had lower pH compared with the control (p<0.05). The control group had lower DM content than treated silages (p<0.05). The concentration of ADF, NDF and WSC in the treated silage decreased with increasing level of addition molasses (p<0.05). The amount of CP, DDM, DE, ME, TDN and TVFA in the treated silages increased with increasing level of addition molasses (p<0.05). Application of 7.5% molasses as an additive to foxtail millet resulted in improved degradation dry matter and aerobic stability (p<0.05).
  S. Arbabi , T. Ghoorchi and S. Hasani
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  S. Arbabi , T. Ghoorchi and A.A. Naserian
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  S. Arbabi and T. Ghoorchi
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  A. Toghdory , T. Ghoorchi , A. Naserian , Y.J. Ahangari and S. Hassani
  Eight multiparous Holstein cows with an average milk production of 34.6±2.8 kg day-1 and body weight of 676±79 kg were used to evaluate the effect of rumen protected and unprotected choline on energy-related biochemical metabolites of lactating dairy cows. The experimental design was a balanced change over design with 4 treatments and 4 periods of 21 days. Experimental treatments were: No Choline (NC), Unprotected Choline (UC) fed at 50 g day-1, Rumen Protected Choline (RPC 25) fed at 25 g day-1 and Rumen Protected Choline (RPC 50) fed at 50 g day-1. Rumen protected choline was blended with 0.25 kg of ground corn and fed once per day as a top dress. Blood samples from coccygeal vessels were collected on last day of each period and analyzed for glucose, triglyceride, cholesterol, blood urea nitrogen, very low density lipoprotein, low density lipoprotein and high density lipoprotein. The result shows that blood metabolites such as glucose, triglyceride, cholesterol, blood urea nitrogen, very low density lipoprotein and low density lipoprotein not affected by treatments (p>0.05). Blood glucose concentration tendency increased by rumen protected and unprotected choline, but wasn’t statistically significant. Unprotected choline decreased concentration of high density lipoprotein than control group (p<0.05). Rumen protected choline had no significant effect on high density lipoprotein levels. High density lipoprotein decreased by using unprotected choline, but other blood metabolites not changed by treatments.
  S. Arbabi , T. Ghoorchi and S. Hasani
  In order to study the effect of delayed ensiling and application of some organic acid-based additives on fermentation of corn silage, chopped whole plant corn mixed with 4 different additives that consists of propionic acid in addition to control treatment without any additive. The additives were: (1) propionic acid (2) propionic acid (85%) + formic acid (15%) (3) calcium propionate and (4) propionic acid (80%) + formic acid (15%) + ammonia (5%). Ten gram per kilogram dry matter of each additives were mixed with chopped corn forage in 2 different times (0, 24 h). Silages were assessed and evaluated for appearance; DM and pH. CP, NDF, ADF, TVFA, WSC, aerobic stability and DM degradation each of treatments were determined after 60 days. Silages that was exposed to air for 24 h, before ensiling had better appearance quality in Filg’s method and whole additives had good effect on appearance quality compared with control group. In the method of DM and pH evaluation, all silages contained buffered propionic acid-based additive, were good and very good. These silages had lower pH than control ones (p<0.05). There was a significant interaction was between silages for concentration of dry matter (p<0.05). NDF in the silages (with propionic acid (85%) + Formic acid (15%)) was lower than the other silages while the contents of CP and TVFA increased (p<0.05) with addition of the additives especially additive containing propionic acid (85%) + formic acid (15%) (p<0.05). WSC in untreated silages was more than the other silage samples (p<0.05). Buffered propionic acid–based additives caused increase in the aerobic stability in treated silages compared with untreated silages. DM degradation (in situ) in untreated silages that delayed ensiled was lower other silages. Application of additives containing propionic acid (80%) + formic acid (15%) + ammonia (5%) resulted in highest DM degradation among experimental additives. Generally, treatment with propionic acid-based additives prevented the decrease of DM degradation (in vitro).
 
 
 
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