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Articles by T. Aburjai
Total Records ( 2 ) for T. Aburjai
  A. Alsarhan , N. Sultana , M.R.A. Kadir and T. Aburjai
  The medicinal plants play an important role in rural health care system throughout the world in remedying and preventing various kinds of diseases. This study documented the use of plants as traditional herbal medicine in the Kangkar Pulai region Johor, Malaysia. It also identified the homogeneity of informant knowledge on medicinal plants suitable for different ailments and types of plants most favored for the treatment of each ailment in the study. The information was gathered through semi-structured interviews, discussions with key informants and informal conversations with local people and herbal practitioners. The data was calculated based on informant consensus factor (Fic) and use value (UV). Information on 40 medicinal plants species from 29 taxonomic plant families used for traditional treatment of different diseases/ailments was documented. The informant consensus factor values (Fic) showed that the local people tend to agree more with each other in terms of the plants used to treat sexual weakness (0.95), blood pressure (0.94), diabetes (0.93), delivery and female problems (0.90), hair problems and dandruff (0.87), respiratory disorder (0.86) and kidney problems (0.85). By contrast, digestive problems (0.76) and skin problems (0.71) and inflammation pain (0.70) were found to have low Fic values. Calculated values of the UV and Fic indicate that this community is knowledgeable on healing and treatment using traditional herbal medicines.
  F. Irshaid , K. Mansi and T. Aburjai
  The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of essential oil extracted from aerial parts of Artemisia sieberi in normal and alloxan induced diabetic rats. Fifty rats were divided into five groups of 10 each. Group I normal rats received 1 mL day-1 of dimethyl sulfoxide (control); group II normal rats received a single dose (80 mg kg-1 b.wt.) of essential oil extract of Artemisia sieberi; group III diabetic rats received 1 mL day-1 of dimethyl sulfoxide; group IV diabetic rats received the oil extract (80 mg kg-1 b.wt.); group V diabetic rats received metformin (14.2 mg kg-1 b.wt.). All treatments were orally administered once a day for six weeks. Changes in blood glucose concentration, body weight and food and water intake were measured and the data obtained were compared with that of metformin. The essential oil extract significantly (p<0.05) lowered blood glucose level as well as food and water intake in diabetic rats accompanied by an increase in body weight gain with no apparent side effect when compared with untreated diabetic rats. These effects were found to be closely similar to that of metformin, a common antidiabetic drug. On other hand, no apparent improvement on body weight gain in diabetic rats treated with metformin. In addition, for all parameters measured, the oil extract showed no effect in normal rats. In conclusion, the essential oil of Artemisia sieberi exhibited antidiabetic activity in alloxan-induced diabetic rats. Present findings support the possible use of the essential oil of Artemisia sieberi as a remedy for diabetes mellitus in humans.
 
 
 
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