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Articles by T Moore
Total Records ( 5 ) for T Moore
  K Kiguchi , T Kitamura , T Moore , M Rumi , H. C Chang , D Treece , L Ruffino , K Connolly and J. DiGiovanni
 

The erbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases are known to play important roles in normal epithelial development and epithelial neoplasia. Considerable evidence also suggests that signaling through the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays an important role in multistage skin carcinogenesis in mice; however, less is known about the role of erbB2. In this study, to further examine the role of both erbB2 and EGFR in epithelial carcinogenesis, we examined the effect of a dual erbB2/EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, GW2974, given in the diet on skin tumor promotion during two-stage carcinogenesis in wild-type and BK5.erbB2 mice. In BK5.erbB2 mice, erbB2 is overexpressed in the basal layer of epidermis and leads to heightened sensitivity to skin tumor development. GW2974 effectively inhibited skin tumor promotion by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate in wild-type and BK5.erbB2 mice, although a more marked effect was seen in BK5.erbB2 mice. In addition, this inhibitory effect was reversible when GW2974 treatment was withdrawn. GW2974 inhibited 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate–induced epidermal hyperproliferation, which correlated with reduced activation of both the EGFR and erbB2. These results support the hypothesis that both the EGFR and erbB2 play an important role in the development of skin tumors during two-stage skin carcinogenesis, especially during the tumor promotion stage. Furthermore, the marked sensitivity of BK5.erbB2 mice to the inhibitory effects of GW2974 during tumor promotion suggest greater efficacy for this compound when erbB2 is overexpressed or amplified as an early event in the carcinogenic process. Cancer Prev Res; 3(8); 940–52. ©2010 AACR.

  Temple The MGC Project Team , D. S Gerhard , R Rasooly , E. A Feingold , P. J Good , C Robinson , A Mandich , J. G Derge , J Lewis , D Shoaf , F. S Collins , W Jang , L Wagner , C. M Shenmen , L Misquitta , C. F Schaefer , K. H Buetow , T. I Bonner , L Yankie , M Ward , L Phan , A Astashyn , G Brown , C Farrell , J Hart , M Landrum , B. L Maidak , M Murphy , T Murphy , B Rajput , L Riddick , D Webb , J Weber , W Wu , K. D Pruitt , D Maglott , A Siepel , B Brejova , M Diekhans , R Harte , R Baertsch , J Kent , D Haussler , M Brent , L Langton , C. L.G Comstock , M Stevens , C Wei , M. J van Baren , K Salehi Ashtiani , R. R Murray , L Ghamsari , E Mello , C Lin , C Pennacchio , K Schreiber , N Shapiro , A Marsh , E Pardes , T Moore , A Lebeau , M Muratet , B Simmons , D Kloske , S Sieja , J Hudson , P Sethupathy , M Brownstein , N Bhat , J Lazar , H Jacob , C. E Gruber , M. R Smith , J McPherson , A. M Garcia , P. H Gunaratne , J Wu , D Muzny , R. A Gibbs , A. C Young , G. G Bouffard , R. W Blakesley , J Mullikin , E. D Green , M. C Dickson , A. C Rodriguez , J Grimwood , J Schmutz , R. M Myers , M Hirst , T Zeng , K Tse , M Moksa , M Deng , K Ma , D Mah , J Pang , G Taylor , E Chuah , A Deng , K Fichter , A Go , S Lee , J Wang , M Griffith , R Morin , R. A Moore , M Mayo , S Munro , S Wagner , S. J.M Jones , R. A Holt , M. A Marra , S Lu , S Yang , J Hartigan , M Graf , R Wagner , S Letovksy , J. C Pulido , K Robison , D Esposito , J Hartley , V. E Wall , R. F Hopkins , O Ohara and S. Wiemann
 

Since its start, the Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC) has sought to provide at least one full-protein-coding sequence cDNA clone for every human and mouse gene with a RefSeq transcript, and at least 6200 rat genes. The MGC cloning effort initially relied on random expressed sequence tag screening of cDNA libraries. Here, we summarize our recent progress using directed RT-PCR cloning and DNA synthesis. The MGC now contains clones with the entire protein-coding sequence for 92% of human and 89% of mouse genes with curated RefSeq (NM-accession) transcripts, and for 97% of human and 96% of mouse genes with curated RefSeq transcripts that have one or more PubMed publications, in addition to clones for more than 6300 rat genes. These high-quality MGC clones and their sequences are accessible without restriction to researchers worldwide.

  S Nesnow , W Ward , T Moore , H Ren and S. D. Hester
 

Conazoles are fungicides used to control fungal growth in environmental settings and to treat humans with fungal infections. Mouse hepatotumorigenic conazoles display many of the same hepatic toxicologic responses as the mouse liver carcinogen phenobarbital (PB): constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) activation, hypertrophy, Cyp2b induction, and increased cell proliferation. The goal of this study was to apply transcriptional analyses to hepatic tissues from mice exposed to PB, propiconazole (Pro) or triadimefon (Tri) at tumorigenic exposure levels to reveal similarities and differences in response among these treatments. Mice were administered diets containing PB (850 ppm), Pro (2500 ppm), or Tri (1800 ppm) for 4 and 30 days. Targeted transcriptomic analyses were conducted at the gene level examining differentially expressed genes (DEGs), and subsets of DEGs: cell cycle genes, and transcription factors. Analyses were also conducted on function, pathway and network levels examining Ingenuity Pathway Analysis Tox Lists and Canonical Pathways, and Gene-Go MetaCore dynamic networks and their central hubs. Genes expressed by PB or the two conazoles were also compared with those genes associated with human hepatocellular cancer. The results from these analyses indicated greater differences between PB and the two conazoles than similarities. Significant commonalities between the two conazole treatments were also noted. We posit that the transcriptional profiles of tissues exposed to toxic chemicals inherently contain their mechanisms of toxicity. We conclude that although PB and these 2 conazoles induce mouse liver tumors and exhibit similar toxicological responses, their transcriptional profiles are significantly different and thus their mechanisms of tumorigenic action are likely to differ.

 
 
 
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